• Mar 28th 2008 at 2:34PM
  • 7
Big serious trucks are not usually what comes to mind when you think of the word "hybrid" but in a world of $100+ barrels of light sweet crude, Peterbilt is putting out some products that may change that. Its medium duty Model 330 (photo above) is just like a Prius. Except it takes diesel and boasts as much torque as a herd of Prii.

Featuring the Eaton parallel hybrid power system, the Model 330 and Model 335 both offer electric motor assist, regenerative braking, lithium ion batteries and fat tax credits. The 330 uses about 30 percent less fuel in an urban driving cycle while the 335 can save a whopping 60 percent when it's used in a utility configuration. How does it do that? Say you're up in the bucket rescuing a kitten restoring power after a thunderstorm, the battery supplies the juice you need to maneuver. If you need more than the battery has, the motor will automatically turn on and quickly recharge it.

Peterbilt has another type of truck that features Eaton's Hydraulic Launch Assist (HLA). The imaginatively-named Model 320 is designed for "vocational stop-and-go applications" or "garbage truck," in the modern parlance. As a vehicle that may stop and go a thousand or more times a day, this Peterbilt takes advantage of hydraulics to recover up to 75 percent of the energy from stopping to use for relaunching.

As has been found with other heavy duty hybrids, maintenance, as well as fuel, savings are significant with these workhorses. Quieter operation and lower environmental impact seal the deal. Check out all the details in the press releases after the jump.

[Source: Peterbilt via eTrucker]




Press release for Model 330 and Model 335

Mar 26 2008
PETERBILT ANNOUNCES FULL PRODUCTION OF MEDIUM DUTY HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES
LOUISVILLE, Kentucky (March 26, 2008) – Peterbilt Motors Company announced plans for full production of its Model 330 and Model 335 medium duty hybrid vehicles during its press conference at the 2008 Mid-America Trucking Show. The vehicles will be in full production at its manufacturing facility in Ste. Therese, Quebec, Canada in summer 2008.

Both the Peterbilt Model 330 and Model 335 Hybrid Electric vehicles feature the Eaton Hybrid Power system and provide customers with impressive fuel savings benefits. The Model 330 utilizes components that provide up to a 30 percent improvement in fuel economy in an urban driving cycle. The Model 335 Hybrid Electric utilizes these same components to provide up to a 60 percent improvement in overall fuel efficiency, when configured for utility applications. The Model 330 Hybrid Electric can be configured for non-CDL operation with hydraulic brakes for a greater range of driver options.

Additionally, the Model 330 and Model 335 hybrids are eligible to receive tax credits from the United States Federal Government as certified by the Department of Treasury's Heavy Manufacturing and Transportation Group. The maximum $12,000 credit for Class 7 hybrids is available for the Model 335 Hybrid Electric in both utility-boom and pickup and delivery applications. A $6,000 credit, the maximum for Class 6 hybrids, is available for the Model 330 Class 6 Hybrid Electric.

"With higher fuel costs and growing concerns with the global carbon footprint, Peterbilt is at the forefront in the development of green technologies that help the environment by providing greater fuel savings and reducing emissions," says Bill Jackson, Peterbilt General Manager and PACCAR Vice President. "Our medium duty hybrid vehicles have been proven in testing across North America to demonstrate impressive fuel efficiency improvements."

Medium Duty Hybrid Electric Vehicles

Both trucks use a parallel hybrid system with an electric motor that assists the diesel engine with supplemental torque for improved fuel economy. The system stores energy during stopping through a process called regenerative braking, and then reuses it to launch and accelerate the vehicle.

The Class 6 Model 330 is powered by the PACCAR PX-6 engine rated at 260 horsepower and 620 ft-lbs of torque. With the hybrid system engaged, horsepower increases to 300 and torque is limited to 860 ft-lbs. This configuration is ideal for stop-and-go use, such as urban pickup and delivery, resulting in up to a 30 percent fuel savings.

Peterbilt's Class 7 Model 335 uses the hybrid electric system for both on-road driving and stationary PTO applications. Also powered by the PACCAR PX-6 engine, it uses the system's lithium-ion batteries to electrically operate the PTO. During bucket operation, the engine needs to run only about 1/6th of the time, versus non-hybrid vehicles. The engine then automatically starts to recharge the batteries, which takes approximately 4.5 minutes, and then shuts off. Fuel use, emissions and noise are greatly reduced when used in municipal and utility applications.

Maintenance requirements are also reduced from the regeneration reducing brake wear, as well as less wear and tear on the engine.

Peterbilt Motors Company, a division of PACCAR Inc (Nasdaq: PCAR), manufactures premium quality trucks for a wide range of markets, including over-the-road, construction, municipal and medium duty. Based in Denton, Texas, Peterbilt combines classic styling, innovative design and superior-quality features in a custom-engineered truck that stands as the "Class" of the industry. Through its 240-plus North American dealer locations, Peterbilt also provides a comprehensive array of TruckCare® aftermarket support programs, including preventive maintenance plans, expedited QuickCare services, automated parts inventory replenishment and 24/7 complimentary Customer Assistance through 1-800-4-PETERBILT. For more information about Peterbilt, visit http://www.peterbilt.com.


Press release for Model 320

Mar 26 2008 PETERBILT ANNOUNCES PRODUCTION OF ITS HYBRID MODEL 320 HYDRAULIC LAUNCH ASSIST VEHICLE
LOUISVILLE, Kentucky (March 26, 2007) – Peterbilt Motors Company announced its plan for full production of the hybrid Model 320 Hydraulic Launch Assist (HLA) vehicle in the fourth quarter of 2008 during its press conference at the 2008 Mid-America Trucking Show.
Peterbilt's low-cab-forward Model 320 Hydraulic Hybrid, for vocational stop-and-go applications such as refuse collection, utilizes HLA technology developed by Eaton Corporation exclusively for PACCAR. The system captures the trucks kinetic energy during braking to assist in launching and accelerating the vehicle. Testing has proven a significant improvement in fuel economy, and indicated the potential to reduce annual brake re-alignment services by 50 percent annually.

"The Model 320 HLA is an ideal environmental option for refuse applications," says Bill Jackson, Peterbilt General Manager and PACCAR Vice President. "Dramatic improvements in fuel economy, reductions in emissions and lower maintenance costs spotlight the Peterbilt Model 320 Hydraulic Hybrid as the environmentally responsible, fuel-efficient solution for municipal and residential solid waste transportation fleets. These fleets operate in some of the most demanding of truck applications, often making 800-1200 stops per day on collection routes."
Hydraulic Launch Assist technology works by recovering up to 75 percent of the energy normally lost as heat by the vehicle's brakes in the form of pressurized hydraulic fluid. This fluid is stored in an on-board accumulator until the driver next accelerates the vehicle.
In "fuel economy mode," savings occur when stored energy is used to launch the vehicle followed seamlessly by power from the primary engine. In "performance mode," the stored energy is released and blended with engine power at launch. Here, a double-digit savings in fuel economy can still be realized, along with an 18 percent improvement in acceleration.

Peterbilt Motors Company, a division of PACCAR Inc (Nasdaq: PCAR), manufactures premium quality trucks for a wide range of markets, including over-the-road, construction, municipal and medium duty. Based in Denton, Texas, Peterbilt combines classic styling, innovative design and superior-quality features in a custom-engineered truck that stands as the "Class" of the industry. Through its 240-plus North American dealer locations, Peterbilt also provides a comprehensive array of TruckCare® aftermarket support programs, including preventive maintenance plans, expedited QuickCare services, automated parts inventory replenishment and 24/7 complimentary Customer Assistance through 1-800-4-PETERBILT. For more information about Peterbilt, visit http://www.peterbilt.com.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 7 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      About time. So much heavy equipment is already series hybrid, makes sense that trucks should be hybridized as well.

      • 6 Years Ago
      The technology for "hybrid diesel" power has been around for a very long time - railroad locomotives have always utilized electric traction motors powered by essentially what amounts to a diesel generator. The problem with using that technology on commercial trucks is that those systems are simply too heavy. Modern truck design doesn't allow for the weight, but more importantly current highway and bridge design don't allow for it either. Trucking companies and drivers both have a vested interest in any technology that increases fuel savings as fuel is the biggest expense for most trucking operations.

      A lot of heavy equipment is indeed of "hybrid" power, typically a diesel power plant supplying power to a vast hydraulic system that also propels the machine - however, one must remember that heavy equipment has extremely different operating parameters then large trucks do (ie: the average front end loaders develops lots of torque, but isn't designed to operate faster than 10-15 mph whereas most modern trucks develope quite a bit of torque (1700-2100 fps) but also develope a large amount of horsepower to propel them at highway speeds).

      Truck emissions have also been dramatically changed in recent years. The EPA has set forth standards that have completely changed vehicle and motor design for large commercial trucks, starting in 2003, again in 2007 and the next phase has been implemented in all 2010 model year trucks. Visible emissions from large trucks have been virtually eliminated with new technology including diesel particulate filters (DPF systems), exhaust gas recirculation valves (EGR), ultra low sulfer diesel fuel and various other new pieces of technology. Some of these updates, revamps and redesigns are also a burden for the trucking industry, the average price for a new truck has historically jumped $14,000 when new technology is released (as mandated by law). New motors often develop less power and are less fuel efficient. Caterpillar, who's Acert motors are very dominant in the trucking industry, will leave the industry all together due to new emissions constraints.

      It's easy to say that trucks are more apt to be the next hybrid platform as an outsider may think that the technology is easier to develop...but a lot of other variables need to be considered before judgements are made.

      So yes, it is easier to create smaller, more fuel efficient cars than lumbering SUVs and pickup trucks when the task at hand doesn't really call for their use.

      We're all glad trucks are getting greener and more fuel efficient...for those of us in the trucking industry it not only means a more profitable operation, but it also means we're doing our part to "be green" as well...remember, we share this planet just like everyone else.
      • 7 Years Ago
      The Seattle Post Intellingencer is trying to be cheery by suggesting a $1200 rebate will help Peterbilt sales.

      Not likely on a $300,000 purchase, yet the *better late than never* hybridizer move is indeed a ray of sunshine.

      A 5/6 diesel fuels saving will certainly make ALL the difference

      And an O/T aside about Ford selling Jaguar to Tata Motors India. Any bets that Tata will eventually market the Jaguar as an EV roadster to compete with our Tesla Roadster? = TG
      • 7 Years Ago
      Well its about time that peter built hop on the green train . It makes alot of sense though . It is so annoying to hear a a loud , air hazard v6 rumble just because some 112 pound guy needs to twist a few wires on the telephone pole ! Even before these hybrids came out and the idea of turning off the engine to use the bucket ever arised i found th engine just idling as such a nuisance and waste of gas. I have always said to myself "why cant those stupid things just run off of the batteries" But hey the technology is here and i hope we take hold of it .
      • 7 Years Ago
      @TG:
      A medium duty 330 Peterbilt like the one pictured above in the NON-hybrid version is around $60-70 thousand new. Not sure how much the hybrid package will add to the cost yet. The rebate for the 330 class 6 hybrid is $6000 and the 335 class 7 hybrid rebate is $12,000.
      • 7 Years Ago
      These kind of heavy hybrids make a lot more sense than forcing ordinary ordinary citizens who need light trucks, vans, SUVs and large sedans into tiny, low-performance, safety-compromised "phone booth" cars.

      Which is exactly what Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama want to do. http://speedzzter.blogspot.com/2008/02/obama-incredible-liteness-of-being.html

      According to Obama's campaign website, "Obama will double fuel economy standards within 18 years."

      Apparently, that means that he supports an increase in the Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standard from the recently-enacted 35 miles per gallon to SEVENTY miles per gallon! (Even if Obama merely wanted to "double" the old CAFE standard, he'd be imposing by big government mandate a FIFTY-SIX miles per gallon average on all light vehicles sold in the United States of America)

      Such radical fuel economy proposals would plunge the world of high-performance and sports cars into an age of banishment far worse than the "dark ages" of the 1970s. ( http://speedzzter.blogspot.com/2007/04/epa-hack-back-to-dismal-70s-again.html)

      A tiny three-cylinder turbo diesel would be the "Shelby GT 500" or "Dodge Viper" "musclecar" of the Obama age of government-controlled motoring.

      Hillary's announced anti-automotive freedom plans are no better that Barack Obama's for motoring enthusiasts.

      Like Obama, Hillary also wants to cut "greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent from 1990 levels by 2050."

      Moreover, "Hillary would increase fuel efficiency standards to 55 miles per gallon by 2030, but would help automakers retool their production facilities through $20 billion in 'Green Vehicle Bonds.'"

      One suspects that a "Green Vehicle" handout would not include retooling for big-block V8 crate engines . . . .

      • 4 Years Ago
      It is great post.The hydraulic hybrid system could be well suited for city buses in large metro areas. Has there been any economic analysis of this application? I see the name Peterbilt and I know it has the proper backing but I looked at the design and I need to be honest, I am scratching my head.. They are thinking different than me. thanks for sharing a good information.
      http://www.truckinc.net/peterbilt_trucks.php