• Mar 4th 2008 at 3:44PM
  • 25
Click image for a hi-res gallery of the Golf TDI Hybrid Concept

Finally, we have the full, complete details on the Volkswagen Golf TDI Hybrid concept. Before we get into the nitty-gritty, lets get one thing out of the way. Volkswagen confirms that a version of this very car is likely to see production (in Europe, at least). Now, on to the details. The Golf TDI hybrid pairs a 74 hp/132 lb-ft 1.2L 3-cylinder diesel (not the 1.4L used in the Polo BlueMotion, as had been speculated) with a 26.6 hp/103 lb-ft electric motor. At low speeds, the car will run in EV-only mode, with the TDI joining in if/when necessary. The tandem should be good for for 69 US mpg and 89 g/km of CO2 emissions in the EU combined cycle. The electric motor replaces the starter motor and alternator, and it will also charge the car's 220v NiMH battery via regenerative braking. When stopped, the diesel cuts out entirely. This is behavior that hybrid drivers are accustomed to. Where this Golf concept veers from the norm somewhat is in its use of a 7-speed DSG instead of a CVT. According to VW, using the dual-clutch transmission helps maximize fuel economy. What's left unsaid, but is known to anyone who has driven a DSG-equipped VW or Audi, is that it should also make it much more engaging to drive, given that the operator can manually shift if he or she wants to.

Visually, the Golf TDI Hybrid is lowered, has smaller intakes, sports a unique grille design, and wears aerodynamic wheels with low-rolling-resistance tires -- all lessons VW has learned with its various Euro-market BlueMotion offerings. The front splitter is the same one used on the GTI Edition 30, and occupants will find a uniquely-trimmed interior waiting for them. Overall, this is a very attractive package that pairs a popular, practical body style with a compelling drivetrain that should not struggle in any normal driving situation. 100+ horses and 235 lb-ft of combined power ensure that the Golf TDI Hybrid can merge and pass with ease, and its hybrid operation should make it excel in local/urban runabout duty. They may be late to the party, but VW looks to have brought something good for the guests to try.


[Source: Volkswagen]

PRESS RELEASE:
83 MPG, 89 G/KM OF CO2: INTRODUCING THE GOLF TDI HYBRID CONCEPT

***EDITOR'S NOTE - MPG figures described are in Imperial gallons***

The challenge: to create a viable, highly-efficient family vehicle capable of emitting less than 90 g/km of CO2. The Volkswagen engineers' solution, unveiled on the eve of the Geneva Motor Show, combines an advanced diesel engine with an electric motor and the very latest generation of seven-speed DSG gearbox. The so-called Golf TDI Hybrid concept vehicle is capable of achieving 83 mpg on the combined cycle and emitting just 89 g/km of CO2 – while around town the vehicle reverts to purely electric mode to be emission-free.

At the core of the new Golf TDI Hybrid is a highly-efficient 1.2-litre three-cylinder common rail TDI diesel engine developing 75 PS and 132 lbs ft of torque. Working either in tandem with the diesel engine or, if required, on its own, is an electric motor developing 27 PS and 103 lbs ft of torque. The electric motor also replaces the conventional starter motor and alternator to save weight and improve packaging.

It can also operate as a generator, recovering kinetic energy from the car during braking to charge the 220 volt, 45 kg nickel metal hydride battery which has a capacity of 1.4 kW hours.

In practice the electric motor powers the vehicle from standstill with the diesel engine only engaging should additional acceleration be required or at higher speeds. In these situations the diesel engine takes over with the electric motor only working if required to supplement the combustion engine – for example, during overtaking manoeuvres. When at a standstill the diesel engine shuts down completely to conserve fuel and increase efficiency. The energy split is relayed to the driver and passengers through a graphic display accessed through the touchscreen satellite navigation screen.

Drive on the concept car is channelled through the new seven-speed DSG twin-clutch gearbox. This features a pair of dry clutches as opposed to the wet clutches and sets a new energy efficiency standard for automatic gearboxes.

Visual changes which differentiate the Golf TDI Hybrid include a new, unique grille design, smaller front air intakes to reduce aerodynamic drag and subtle 'TDI-Hybrid' badging. The Golf TDI Hybrid also sits lower than the standard Golf on revised suspension and adopts the front splitter from the Golf GTI Edition 30 to help further reduce aerodynamic drag. A unique interior further distinguishes the Golf TDI Hybrid from the conventional vehicle.

The Golf TDI Hybrid is currently a concept vehicle, but a version of this vehicle is likely to go into production in the future.

This study follows the recent launch of the efficient new Golf BlueMotion. Adopting an optimised 1.9-litre, four-cylinder diesel engine linked to a revised gearbox and more efficient aerodynamics the Golf BlueMotion can achieve a combined 62.8 mpg while emitting just 119 g/km of CO2 meaning it will be exempt from the London Congestion Charge from October 27th onwards.

Timing
  • Makes its world debut at the Geneva Motor Show
  • The Golf TDI Hybrid is likely to inspire a future production vehicle

Key facts
  • An engineering study aimed at extracting maximum efficiency from the combination of an advanced common rail diesel engine and a powerful electric motor designed to work in tandem; also uses very latest generation of seven-speed DSG gearbox
  • The so-called Golf TDI Hybrid concept vehicle is capable of achieving 83 mpg on the combined cycle and emitting just 89 g/km of CO2; around town the vehicle reverts to purely electric mode to be emission-free
  • Powered by a highly-efficient 1.2-litre three-cylinder common rail TDI diesel engine developing 75 PS and 132 lbs ft of torque. Working either in tandem with the diesel engine or, if required, on its own, is an electric motor developing 27 PS and 103 lbs ft of torque. The electric motor also replaces the conventional starter motor and alternator to save weight and improve packaging
  • The motor also operates as a generator, recovering kinetic energy from the car during braking to charge the 220 volt, boot-mounted 45 kg nickel metal hydride battery which has a capacity of 1.4 kW hours
  • The electric motor powers the vehicle from standstill with the diesel engine only engaging should additional acceleration be required or at higher speeds. In these situations the diesel engine takes over with the electric motor only working if required to supplement the combustion engine – for example, during overtaking manoeuvres
  • When the vehicle is stationary the diesel engine shuts down completely to conserve fuel and increase efficiency. The energy split is relayed to the driver and passengers through a graphic display accessed through the touchscreen satellite navigation screen
  • Drive on the concept car is channelled through the new seven-speed DSG twin-clutch gearbox
  • Visual changes which differentiate the Golf TDI Hybrid include a new, unique grille design, smaller front air intakes to reduce aerodynamic drag and subtle 'TDI-Hybrid' badging. The Golf TDI Hybrid also sits lower than the standard Golf on revised suspension and adopts the front splitter from the Golf GTI Edition 30 to help further reduce aerodynamic drag
A unique interior further distinguishes the Golf TDI Hybrid from the conventional vehicle


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 25 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      I want to know what the mpg would be for the Golf without all the additional weight of the hybrid set-up. A 1.2L diesel and a 7 speed DSG would make for a much more affordable set-up, with exceptional mpg probably over 50 mpg. Of course you would lose the "social status" of driving a hybrid. If such a thing exists.
      • 7 Years Ago
      this car will be faster as 100mph on the 75hp diesel engine allone..

      In Germany you get the Golf with a old 2.0l n/a diesel engine with 75hp 103ft.lbs as a entry level car.. with less torque and the standart aerodynamic of the curret production Golf and 2700lbs curb weight ..it reaches 163km/h = 102mph

      A hybrid with the same hp but 2.5times the torque plus the assist of a electro engine plus hugely improved aerodynamic will get a higher topspeed
      • 7 Years Ago
      I want to know what the maximum sustained speed is.
      Yes the helper motor has 27hp maximum output, but the battery doesn't have infinite capacity.
      • 7 Years Ago
      combien sa vaut cet ostie de char là??
      • 7 Years Ago
      Aside from current situation where Euros is so much stronger than US Dollar, I thought part of the cost cutting measure for VW is to assemble American VWs in Mexico.

      Since the production version of this concept will probably be build in Germany, we should expect higher price premiums comparable to VW R32 ($30K+), or rebrand as an Audi.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Charles, if I'm not mistaken, the 7-speed DSG is indeed now available and is paired with TSI/TDI engines in some Golf and Polo models in Germany (and other European markets, I assume).
      • 7 Years Ago
      So if the top speed is 100mph, it should be able to sustain 75mph on a grade, into a headwind.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I don't know why anyone here is talking about "top speed" in a fuel efficient car? If any of us had one, we'd drive it 80mph tops, on our daily commutes to and from work. I wouldn't care if it can go 100mph or not. If I wanted something fast I'd get a Veyron ;-)
      • 7 Years Ago
      @Throwback The situation is not much different than with a Prius, so the question has already been answered some years ago.
      @Ricochet Diesels are only slightly more expensive if at all in Europe, mainly because they build so many if not more of them than gas engines.
      The electro motor is a very cheap part, the DSG does add to the price, but the new model is much cheaper to produce than the current one.
      So the Golf will definitely be more expensive, but isn't always the case when you want a product that introduces new technologies?
      • 7 Years Ago
      Sounds GREAT! I can't wait to see it in the showrooms.
      • 7 Years Ago
      The main secret of Volkswagen is the new Golf 6. The main reason why it launches in 2008 and not in 2010 (as planned) is fast cost reduction. VWs new CR-Diesel-motor generation is about 200€ less per motor. The new DSG is cheaper in production, too. The production time for one model will become much lower and some parts of the PQ365/PQ36 have been improved for cheaper production an less complex construction. So the hybrid could become affordable through savings VW does on the new car.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I speculate this will be too expensive and won't even attempt the North American market until a few years have elapsed (2012?) Right now there is a hefty premium on T2 B5 diesels, as well as premium for hybrid (motor/batteries) as well as the premium for a 7speed DSG.

      A manual transmission Diesel golf will get good enough mileage for me and be $3k or $4k cheaper.
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