• Feb 28, 2008

Click above to view more high-res shots of the Toyota Tundra


Congrats to the Toyota Tundra. It has just been named "Truck of the Year" by Farm Industry News, a leading product and technology magazine for "high-income, Midwestern farmers" (their words, not ours). Though an accolade from FIM doesn't carry as much weight with normal shoppers as does a pair of golden calipers from Motor Trend, the award is still significant. As automakers watch buyers turn away from trucks as lifestyle vehicles, the endorsement of a magazine read by people who actually use a truck for its intended purpose has its own gravitas.

Then again, just how does a farm magazine determine the truck of the year? In the case of Farm Industry News, you simply add up all of the reader responses to product information (you know, those tear-out cards) and determine which is most popular. Considering the Toyota Tundra was all-new last year, it probably goes without saying that it was going to make the biggest splash!


[Source: Farm Industry News]



PRESS RELEASE:

TOYOTA TUNDRA NAMED TRUCK OF THE YEAR BY FARM INDUSTRY NEWS

LOUISVILLE, KY. – Farm Industry News, one of the leading agriculture trade publications in the United States, has selected the Toyota Tundra as its truck of the year.

Toyota was cited at the magazine's FinOvation awards reception held during the National Farm Machinery Show in Louisville in February. The readers of Farm Industry News chose the Tundra as the most innovative product in the trucks category. On hand to accept the award for Toyota was Scott Neiheisel, regional marketing manager for Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc. – Cincinnati region.

The FinOvation awards are presented annually to products drawing the greatest number of reader responses to product information published in the magazine throughout the year. The FinOvation winners represent the most innovative products that came to market last year. The winners will be featured in an upcoming issue of Farm Industry News.

The all-new Tundra, introduced in 2007, sets a new benchmark in the full-size pickup truck segment for performance, capability and standard safety features. The 2008 Tundra full-size pickup lineup offers a choice of 44 model variations in three cab styles as well as three wheelbases, three bed lengths, three engines and a trio of trim levels.

About Farm Industry News

Farm Industry News focuses exclusively on providing farmers with information that helps them make the best use of their input dollars. Each issue delivers stories about new products and services, high-tech agricultural developments and industry trends that could influence their buying decisions. Farm Industry News' circulation is 205,000 readers. The FinOvation awards reflect the publication's recognition of a farmer's need for detailed product information. The award is given to innovative marketers who meet those needs.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 38 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      I work for a Ford dealer and we have watched unbiased traing videos pertaing to how the Tundra stands up to the rest(best). Even though I do work at a Ford dealership, hands down the big three build a far superior truck to the Tundra. It has to be almost impossible to try to capture sales from a market dominated by the big three. I know that, at least in our area, Toyota is offering up big rebates on Tundras ($2,750), and I have never seen that before (people seemed snowed into paying sticker for these foreign branded cars). Anyway, I think I'll stick to what I've always known to be right/true and stick to my Ford (or Chevy/Dodge if Ford wasn't paying my bills!).
      • 6 Years Ago
      6 speed automatic trumps cylinder shutoff.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Then why do the GM vehicles get better fuel mileage?
        • 6 Years Ago
        By the fuel economy numbers?

        and by better, you mean worse, right?
        Tundra 4x2 14/18, 4x4 13/17

        GM 6.0 V8 4x2 13/18, 4x4 13/17, and it is slower than the Tundra.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Strike One:
      "high-income, Midwestern farmers" WTH!!!

      Strike Two:
      Most often, FinOvation winners are the new and innovative products that farmers learned about for the first time by reading the editorial content of Farm Industry News. This does not mean it's the product of choice, just which one had more requests.

      Strike Three:
      "The FinOvation awards reflect the publication's recognition of a farmer's need for detailed product information. The award is given to innovative marketers who meet those needs."

      - Where are the unbiased test of these products by actual farmers????


      Starting a Toyota flame war over this useless award is like the US starting a war with IRAN because Ahmadinejad told Bush "Ya momma wears combat boots"....
      • 6 Years Ago
      I guess floppy frames and giggling beds are what farmers like...
        • 6 Years Ago
        Beat me to it Matt. :)
        • 6 Years Ago
        Frames, beds, and bodies need to flex, bend, and "jiggle" if it's going to be tough. Building something as stiff and rigid as possible will guarantee failure. If you want a similar example, buildings made to withstand earthquakes are build to flex and absorb a pounding. A rigid building will colapse.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Yes Farmers like floppy frames and giggly beds. They are better than broken down trucks.
          • 6 Years Ago
          "Yes Farmers like floppy frames and giggly beds. They are better than broken down trucks."

          Thats good to know...tell me...can Toyotas run with broken crankshafts?

          And tell me...what do farmers thing of crumbling tailgates?
        • 6 Years Ago
        Guess when it comes to their lively hood, a truck that is dependable more important.

        Flame suit on...
      • 6 Years Ago
      I find the GM and Toyota thing a tad funny, you left out Ford. I had the Lincoln version, my buddy has the F150, most people I know with Fords are extremely happy. Last I checked, there is no shortage of Ford trucks on farms I pass. Just a thought :)
      • 6 Years Ago
      Sad part is everyone seems to agree Ethanol is a bad idea, except our Government. At some point, they will be forced to face this and farmers will be having sales of used farm equipment and Toyota trucks :( And I hate to even touch on the fact that someday our 1 in 3 obese people will eventually realize high fructose corn syrup is not a healthy thing and in many of the liquid based garbage they buy. This corn thing, IMHO is all bad, except the corn we actually eat, mmmmm, corn on the cob.
        • 6 Years Ago
        You can thank the large agribusinesses and their lobbyists for this.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Autoblog just loves Tundra flame war traffic...
      • 6 Years Ago
      Frames, beds, and bodies need to flex, bend, and "jiggle" if it's going to be tough. Building something as stiff and rigid as possible will guarantee failure. If you want a similar example, buildings made to withstand earthquakes are build to flex and absorb a pounding. A rigid building will colapse.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Do you think that videos supplied by Ford, to be used in training Ford sales staff, are likely to be unbiased? Why or why not? Explain using critical thinking skills.

      Regarding the "jiggly" bed, I'm sorry, any large body-on-frame pickup feels like it's made of foam rubber on a really rough road. They're inherently just not that stiff. And frankly, I'm not sure how measuring torsional strength alone (if the video I saw was the one being referred to above) determines "the best truck." I think it's an oversimplified appeal to our desire for "the strongest" one.

      FWIW, I don't like the Tundra any better than I like the Silverado or F-150. They're all huge, crap-to-drive appliances to me.
        • 6 Years Ago
        give me any 2 trucks and ask me to make one look better- not hard.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Toyota's giggle gives new meaning to giggle, it actually made people laugh that was watching.
        • 6 Years Ago
        The people that were laughing were Ford employees. Think they might already have had an opinion?

        For future reference, any video from "Cardatavideos" on YouTube was filmed at a Ford dealership training session.

        Besides, all this video proves is that Ford found a speed on that washboard course that excites resonating frequencies in two chassis (the Toyota and GM), but not in another (the Ford). I've driven all three of those trucks extensively, and the difference in rigidity is nowhere near as pronounced as the video suggests.

        What might have happened if they drove the washboard course at 20 mph? at 35? That's right, the impact frequency would have been different, and so would the resulting jiggle.

        PS - a "giggle" is a small laugh.
          • 6 Years Ago
          "Besides, all this video proves is that Ford found a speed on that washboard course that excites resonating frequencies in two chassis (the Toyota and GM), but not in another (the Ford). I've driven all three of those trucks extensively, and the difference in rigidity is nowhere near as pronounced as the video suggests."

          I have seen the Tundra "jiggle" while going over man-hole covers.

          The "truck" is junk.
      • 6 Years Ago
      It's official,the redneck hicks love their jap trucks !!!! Let's all have a good ole BBQ !!!!
      • 6 Years Ago
      The used car lots are already full of them. I saw one in the local paper this week for $24,000 that orgionally sold for $40,000 with only 12,000 miles on the ode, that is a $16,000 depreciation. Buyers are finding them to be gas hogs with not so great quality, not a good truck.
        • 6 Years Ago
        yes, same here, i've seen a lot with 10-15K miles, used in the lots, sitting there, and are like 25-30k, going for 38-42k just 6 months ago
      • 6 Years Ago
      In what twisted messed up world are farmers driving Tundras??
      I live in South Texas, I am surround by tens of thousands of acres of farm land where there are hundreds of farmers and thousands of farm hands.
      The number one trucks here are Chevy and Fords, followed closely behind by Dodge Rams.
      Most of them are diesel and almost all of them are heavy duty, 3/4 or one ton units. Can anyone point me in the direction of the 1 ton Tundra diesel???
      Didn't think so.
      I drive all over this area and have yet to see one Tundra used on a farm or ranch. Not one.
      In fact I have only seen a couple used on job sites.
      Sorry, but I'm not buying this Toyota farm business. Maybe people in Iowa drive them on their farms, but not down here.
        • 6 Years Ago
        :( It skipped over my cautionary first line.

        "Flame suit ON!"
        • 6 Years Ago


        Toyota might have "given" some farmers Tundras in exchange for positive "review". That or they just payed for title. Marketing is such a BS area. Every vehicle is the best selling car in its class did you not know!

        The Tundra is the best truck that has X engine, that costs X amount, and has X axle, X doors. I am guessing, but Toyota specifically does not do "suicide" doors on extended cabs, for that specific reason. "No the Tundra is a Double cab, not extended or king cab!"

        I was "instructed" to buy one for our company (company bought it), and while it is not a bad vehicle, I don't see where it should get all the praise it is getting.
          • 6 Years Ago
          Don't go disrespecting the Iowans like that. :) Well, were I'm from we do have a lot of Iowa jokes, but even they drive Ford, Chevy and Dodge when it comes to truck. A large portion of them are 3/4 ton or better.

          The only place I see Tundra is folks driving around the city, even they they are few and far between.
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