Quite some time ago we spoke about LPP Combustion, LLC, which has a patented combustion system based on Lean, Premixed, Prevaporized (can you guess where "LPP" comes from?) combustion of liquid fuels. The system converts liquid fuels into a synthetic natural gas, called LPP gas, which can be burned in natural gas combustion systems with no modifications to the combustion hardware.
LPP Combustion had yet to try it with biofuels, so ethanol was put through the system. Ethanol was the most carbon-neutral possible way of running combined-cycle power plants that would usually work with Natural Gas (well, so LPP Combustion claims if the ethanol is obtained in the best way possible). If expanded, burning ethanol-sourced LPP gas could lead to the cleanest way of using biofuels up to date, because LPP Combustion claims the LPP syngas combustion as clean as natural gas:

Demonstrated natural gas-level emissions from bio-derived ethanol (ASTM D-4806) during gas turbine combustor testing, emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter (soot) were the same as natural gas-level emissions achieved using current dry low emission (DLE) gas turbine combustion technology. In addition, the combustion of this bio-derived ethanol produced virtually no net carbon dioxide emissions.


While not on par with making biodiesel to make hydrogen, does it make sense to make ethanol to make (basically) natural gas?

[Source: LPP combustion]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • From Our Partners

    You May Like
    Links by Zergnet
    Share This Photo X