• Feb 12, 2008
Click above to view the video of the Ferrari P4/5 in Florida.

It's been a while since we've gotten an update on the Ferrari P4/5, but Matt Farah of New York Motor Club fame spent some time with the always affable James Glickenhaus at the Palm Beach Supercar Weekend to see how things are going with the man's bespoke-bodied Enzo. Aside from getting to see the P4/5 from a series of angles, Farah gets into some of the details that Glickenhaus has added after fleshing out the hyper car over the course of its life. The new exhaust tips were one topic of conversation. Based off the 2003 Ferrari F1 car's exhaust setup, they actually provide more downforce as exhaust gases are expelled onto the rear wing. There's plenty of other technical tidbits to be had, so hit the jump to watch the video.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 12 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      "Based off the 2003 Ferrari F1 car's exhaust setup, they actually provide more downforce as exhaust gases are expelled onto the rear wing."

      Terribly sorry, but I call bullcrap on that.

      There is no way the car can exert a force on itself.Somewhat similar to Wile. E. Coyote mounting a fan to blow wind into a sail mounted on the same cart thing, there is no way the car can exert a force on itself.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Yeah....

        Just like an aircraft's propeller can't create lift on the wing directly in the prop wash...

        if the exhaust wake passes over a wing, and the exhaust gas has velocity, it creates inverse lift on an inverted wing. Commonly called: Downforce.

        The exhaust outlet shape merely tailors the exhaust flow into the slipstream over the bodywork, and trims that airflow over the aerodynamic surfaces.

        If a car can create downforce with it's own velocity through the atmosphere, it can just as easily direct pressurized exhaust gas over the same aero surfaces.

        all the spoilers in the world are just for looks when standing still, in order to work, they have to move. And the car moves itself, thus, a vehicle can create it's own downforce, and this just manages it's own exhaust to add to the effect, rather than simply being dumped into the aerodynamic wake.
          • 6 Years Ago
          But mk, it's if you stand on a scale with your hands made into a cup shape, and blow into your hands, does your weight go up? By your definition of downforce, you are making yourself heavier by doing so.

          I'm not discrediting you, because I don't really understand prop wash and all that (I'm not an aero engineer, though I work with one that I can ask this to). All I remember from physics is that an object cannot exert a net force on itself. I can't push down on my head and make myself heavier, so in my feeble mind, a car can't simply use it's exhaust to push itself down...

          My head hurts...

          Actually, I will talk to that aero engineer. This is really intriguing to me.
      • 6 Years Ago
      the guy who owns it looks like a douche with his collar raised like that.
      • 6 Years Ago
      What up kids? seriously, does he think I'm 12? Not a great opening, especially considering the piss poor, seemingly novice interview he gets with Glickenhaus that follows (i.e. why didn't you paint this surface that will get wicked hot when the car is on?). yuck.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I went to this show and the Cavallino Classic held at The Breakers across the Intracoastal Waterway that you see behind him some of the time.

      That annoying music you hear in the background was from one of the various tents set up there at the show. The P4/P5 was pretty close the main gate, where they had the music blaring.

      This show was absolutely worth the $40 to get in. There were sooo many suh-weet cars there. I've got a ton of pics...I should post them up for you all to see.

      One of the highlights of the day was a guy driving his 360 Modena with his hot g/f and him backing up along a curb...major wheel-curb contact. I cringed!
      • 6 Years Ago
      More Ferrari news, less Kitt/Camaro news.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Well, I am an aerospace engineering student, and an F1 fan so lets set this straight. I have heard the reason for the exhaust positioning on an F1 car is because the overall length of the exhaust is tuned to a heimholtz resonance frequency (similar to how headers are tuned to a frequency as well). If it went out the back the tubing distance would not be correct. But, in regards to the earlier question, this can increase downforce in two ways, flow velocity and flow density. Both effect the amount of lift/downforce on an airfoil. Although in my opinion, its probably negligable. I have also heard that F1 cars would if it weren't for tubing length considerations have exhausts going out the back, as this is a large area of low presure which would help evacuate exhaust gasses and in turn reduce the pressure differential at the rear and therefore drag. Hope this helps.
        • 6 Years Ago
        That's incredibly helpful. Thanks!

        Next time I'll keep my big mouth shut...

        *runs away to hide*
      • 6 Years Ago
      It is not as the Coyote example, as the fan does not rely on pressure, but upon Normal force (the wind goes to one direction and the sail goes to the opposite) equal to zero. Hence not movement would be expected.
      The Bernoulli principle, present on the exhaust example, acts upon pressure differentials, not forces and does apply to the Ferrari and the F1 alike. Of course the exhaust gas does create a (minimal) negative pressure, and downforce.
      Farris, you, my fellow friend, should study a bit more physics before calling bullcrap on that.
      • 6 Years Ago
      I think the backfilling thing he mentioned is the real reason, dunno about the downforce thing, he said F1's use this tech? I'll check it out.
      • 6 Years Ago

      It is not as the Coyote example, as the fan does not rely on pressure, but upon Normal force (the wind goes to one direction and the sail goes to the opposite) equal to zero. Hence not movement would be expected.
      The Bernoulli principle, present on the exhaust example, acts upon pressure differentials, not forces and does apply to the Ferrari and the F1 alike. Of course the exhaust gas does create a (minimal) negative pressure, and downforce.
      Farris, you, my fellow friend, should study a bit more physics before calling bullcrap on that.