• Jan 22, 2008
We've seen the Camaro coupe and convertible concepts over the past two years at venues like the Detroit and Chicago auto shows. A stunning yellow Camaro also had the starring role on the biggest Hollywood blockbuster of 2007. We're even getting "spy shots" of the production Camaro taken by General Motors engineers that are posted on the GM Fast Lane blog. What we won't see any time soon is a production Camaro being unveiled during 2008. Kicking Tires quotes Chevy execs as saying that the company wants to avoid overexposure when production is still a year away. The General also wants to get the concept car to less prominent show sites like Houston and Cleveland, and there aren't many hand-made models to spread out across the country.

Since this is the third year in a row that at least one Camaro concept has been shown at the Detroit show, the crowd gathering around the Mustang fighter has gotten decidedly smaller. We're thinking the reason for that is because the public is now ready for the production model, but since a salable model is still a year away, the General is smart to hold off until the iconic pony car is closer to dealer lots. Besides, if we get a new picture from GM every week or two, it'll more than curb our cravings for bow-tie pony power for the time being.




[Source: Kicking Tires]


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  • 28 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      Avoid overexposure? Are they kidding! The Camaro has to be the most overexposed-overhyped car there ever was. At this point I'm sick about hearing about it.
      If they cancelled the project I wouldn't careless.
      Eventally.....when this car comes out it's going to seem like a 5 year old car. From the spy shots I've seen I'm really not impressed. For that matter, Ford can kill the Mustang and it's 300 varients too.
      • 7 Years Ago
      well, I think GM had to get hte CTS adn Malibu right before they made the camaro

      But I hope the interiro is not even close to the ugly ones seen on these mules, otehrwise this car will fail expectations and will have only a 4yr lifespan before they stop making it again
        • 7 Years Ago
        Is there a semi-cool car that GM has built that they didn't kill just as they got it right, which is generally - for them - between 4 and 6 years in?

        How long the Fiero?
        How long the Aurora?
        How long the Allante'?

        How long have they been building the XLR?
      • 7 Years Ago
      I spent some time with a lower-level GM exec this past summer and the reason, according to him, the Camaro is past due for everything is because the prototypes are pieces of sh*t. He says a new manufacturing process is being introduced for the new Camaro and the results are not good. He fears GM may have another mistake on it's hands if the process isn't tightened up A LOT between now and actual production. Crazy that GM is gambling both process and product, but these are hard times in the auto industry and you have to hope GM is learning from it's previous decades worth of mistakes.
        • 7 Years Ago
        that's the most ridiculous thing i've heard

        production as far as i know is right on schedule.. i keep up with Camaro news religiously and your comment is the first i've heard of this "issue".. so until i see it from sources which i know to be reputable, i'll assume you are full of BS, or the person you talked to is.
      • 7 Years Ago
      A bit late to stuff the genie back in the bottle?
      • 7 Years Ago
      Mine will be Huggar orange with black stripes, don't care how long it is, i'm not buying anything else..........period!
      • 7 Years Ago
      Bonehead, the new Mustang debuted in 2003 and was in production in 2004, but it was built from a modified version of an existing chassis and built at the plant that was already set up to build the previous generation Mustang. Likewise, the Challenger is being built at the plant that is already building the 300 and Charger and on a shortened version of that Chassis.

      The Camaro is not an "entirely new class" of car, but it is, in essence, an entirely new car. It's not an evolution of previous versions. The only thing they share is the name "Camaro" and the LSx engine family.

      GM did not have the platform nor the plant to build a Camaro at the time the concept debuted. They had to wait until Zeta (a program that had its own production delays) was complete and now an entirely new production line has to be tooled at Oshawa, previously an exclusively FWD plant to build the Camaro.

      There were also contract restrictions with the previous St. Therese plant, who had an exclusive mandate to build Camaro that GM had to wait out before they could proceed with a production version.

      At the time GM showed the Camaro concept, it was just a concept. There was very little business case for it. It had to be a smash hit on the show circuit to get the bean counters to approve production.

      We'd all have liked to have seen it sooner, but is it really "old news" to the average Joe? I mean, what percentage of the population hangs on auto sites? I'd say for every auto enthusiast that hangs on every production announcement there are thousands who saw Bumblebee in Transformers but have no idea it's a sneak preview of the 2010 Camaro.

      The Mustang facelift will be making some noise right around the time that Camaro is launched, but I still don't think a facelift is necessarily as big a deal as an all new car. And while Mustang fans are near rabid, there's a fair amount of pent up Camaro demand out there from those Chevy enthusiasts who simply will not purchase a Mustang.
        • 7 Years Ago
        I'm one of those Chevy enthusiasts. If the 4.6L motor wasn't such a POS (I had a 1992 Grand Marquis from 80k - 130k, I know the motor quite well), I may have picked one up to trade in for a Camaro :). Instead I hung on to my Caprice to serve as my DD.
        • 7 Years Ago
        "Exactly how is a RETRO muscle car not an evolution of previous versions."

        Because a car that is new from the ground up, whether it is in the spirit of the previous versions or not, cannot by definition be an "evolution."

        "Sure they arent keeping up the american tradition of using a platform for 20 years or reusing the same interior for 10 years but the Camaro is as much an evolution of previous version as any car on the market."

        I don't think that is true. The new Toyota Corolla, which shares much of its platform with the previous Corolla, is an "evolution" of the Corolla. Whenever Toyota does a clean sheet redesign of the Corolla, in say 4 or 5 years, that will be a new car. Not an evolution. It will likely maintain many of the characteristics that the brand name "Corolla" has come to encompass, but that will not make it an "evolution" of the previous car.

        "How come everyone else can be down the road to production with a revision of a car before showing a concept."

        Because if it is truly an "evolution" of a previous car and you have a platform to build it on and a plant ready to go to build it in, that's way easier than building an all new car at a totally retooled plant.

        "Why couldn't Chevy figure out with its 40 years of experience in this market, that there was a market for this car."

        Because General Motors is unfortunately saddled with a bunch of non car-guy bean counters (the root of most, if not all of their problems) that might not have been so sure. That's my guess, but I understand your point here.

        "Im with Frylock350, GM left the party, said the market for muscle cars is dead, realised that if someone actually made a decent muscle car again (Mustang) that the market isnt dead."

        I'll agree to a degree here as well, but there are other factors. GM left the market because the 4th Gen Camaro and Firebird did not meet 2003 crash standards. The car wasn't selling in big numbers, but was profitable even as it was. Not enough so to merit a complete redesign on what, as you pointed out, amounts to a decades old platform to meet new standards. Instead, they shut down and put Camaro on "hiatus." When it appeared that a platform that might work for a new Camaro was on the way - Zeta, then plans could begin on a replacement. And by waiting, rather than an evolution of an existing car, there is a whole new, clean sheet design with no catalytic converter hump in the floor and an independent rear suspension among a myriad of other benefits.

        And Ford didn't have to "make a decent musclecar again." The Mustang was already selling very well, sales were in fact going up, before the new 2005 debuted.


        "Then they put out a concept car just to do market research to verify that the market is indeed alive. Then told everyone "great glad you like it, we'll give it to you in 3 years". It is evident that GM does not know its own market and they are late to market because of it."

        That's not really the only reason that they are "late to market."

        1. There wasn't a whole lot of business case for the Camaro to start with. Sales were falling for the old car. Yes, it was way outdated, but bean counters see only numbers.

        2. Prior to the shuttering of St. Therese Chevy could not have made another Camaro if they had wanted to. Due to the contract there, if Chevy had said that they were going to produce the Camaro they would have HAD to have produced it at the outdated and way to large for the purpose St. Therese. By waiting, they are able to retool a line at the much more modern and "right-sized" Oshawa - one of the highest quality assembly plants in North America.

        3. There was no platform available to build the Camaro on. The F-Body was the last RWD platform that GM had left, there was no passenger car to base it off of like the 1965 Mustang was based off the Falcon and the 1967 Camaro was based off the Chevy II back in the days when everything was rear drive. A dedicated platform would, obviously, be too expensive and Zeta development had to be completed before there was any chance of a production Camaro seeing the light of day. That whole project was almost scrapped more than once.

        Nobody wanted to wait three years for the new Camaro, I'm sure that most at Chevy didn't, either, but remember, it's the blog sites and auto news sites continually running Camaro stories. It's not like Chevy is running TV and magazine ads for it.

        I guess Nissan is late to market, too after showing the GT-R Proto in 2005 and just now getting the production GT-R to market. I've been reading about that car for years, darn it. Everywhere. Every site. Every magaz
        • 7 Years Ago
        Eric77TA
        "It's not an evolution of previous versions."

        exactly how is a RETRO muscle car not an evolution of previous versions. Sure they arent keeping up the american tradition of using a platform for 20 years or reusing the same interior for 10 years but the camaro is as much an evolution of previous version as any car on the market. How come everyone else can be down the road to production with a revision of a car before showing a concept.

        "At the time GM showed the Camaro concept, it was just a concept. There was very little business case for it. It had to be a smash hit on the show circuit to get the bean counters to approve production."

        yeah that is exactly my issue. Why couldnt chevy figure out with its 40 years of experience in this market, that there was a market for this car. Im with Frylock350, GM left the party, said the market for muscle cars is dead, realised that if someone actually made a decent muscle car again (mustang) that the market isnt dead. Then they put out a concept car just to do market research to verify that the market is indeed alive. Then told everyone "great glad you like it, we'll give it to you in 3 years". It is evident that GM does not know its own market and they are late to market because of it.



      • 7 Years Ago
      If you want to see one "in the flesh" there is one on display at the Montreal Auto Show, probably for historical reasons -- the last model Camaro was made at a nearby GM plant that has since been demolished.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I really wish some people would relax. I do not care how much you piss and moan it is not going t change anything. Here are some facts...

      GM showed this thing two years ago at the Detroit auto show as a concept and CONCEPT ONLY! In August of that year they announced at the Tech Center that they were going to produce it. (I was at the event) So if you do the math From August of 2006 to November of 2008 is around 2.5 years give or take a month. That is not a bad amount of time from green light to production on a totally new platform in North America. The only reason Dodge is doing any better is they have an existing platform. stepping back and looking at it I really do not think they are doing much better. They are basically building 5,000ish SRT8's for this year and by the time they get full production going it will be late in the year for a 2009 model anyway. This all being said if you do not want one then do not buy one. I will tell you one thing... If GM puts in the time and quality materials into this like they have in all of there products released in the last year then they are going to have a winner.
        • 7 Years Ago
        2.5 years may be a decent amount of time to create a new car and platform but it is way too long to do so in the public eye. People consider the camaro as an alternative to the Mustang. The new Mustang concept debuted in 2003 and was available for purchase in 2004. Compare that to the Chevy that debuted in 2006 and will available for purchase in 2009. That is just too long of a gap. Its not like they were developing an entirely new class of car, just a revision of the same car they have made for decades. Chevy made a mistake by showing that car prior to actually starting any work on production. Now it is old news before it can even be purchased, and the next mustang revision will steal its thunder. (dont get me wrong i like the car, but this seems like one big PR blunder)
      • 7 Years Ago
      Retro isn't pre-aged, it's timeless styling. Jeeps have looked the same since WWII, you can't produce a Mini Cooper that doesn't look like a Mini Cooper and it's not very hard to update unmistakable shapes for every new model.

      It's better for GM to keep a lid on the production car as much as possible. They haven't pushed it hard since Transformers. What we see surfing these sites is people with cameras trying to scoop the car and that's how it gets exposed.

      Being last to the party isn't necessarily a bad thing, it gives GM the opportunity to produce the best product with the best features and tweak the styling.
        • 7 Years Ago
        GM isn't late, they left the party, realized it was pretty fun and are running to get back in before its over.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Right about the time Chevy is "ready" to show the production car, Ford and Dodge will debut their muscle car concepts that are 3+ years from production. How the hell has it taken GM so long to get this car into production. Looks to me like all they have done in that time is a movie promo, a convertable concept (took a year to come up with that one), and made the vents faux vents. (hating that faux vent on the hood). That said, i do think this is the best looking of the new muscle cars.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Usually when a highly anticipated model,especially the Camaro experiences mysterious delays in production model debut from the greenlight can mean several things.
      1. Production ramp-up problems.( Zeta Platform Quality issues?)
      2. Meeting Government safety issues ( Again Zeta Issues?)
      3.GM is still struggling to right itself from near bankruptcy.
      4.Since the greenlight in 2006 the Economy has essentially gone into the Tank (Can we say Recession?)
      5.Inflation, Inflation, Inflation.With The price of gas going through the roof this affects GM just as it does everyone else. The cost of producing the Camaro is going up also it could be said maybe the beancounters are getting nervous also.I am sure they budgeted some increase in cost at the outset but no-one could have predicted 4.00$ a gallon gasoline that is coming soon.
      6.I pray that this last one is wrong but it should be said GM once again has dropped the ball,and will scrap the entire project because of their historic mismanagement
      of product cycling.
      Enough of this scary tales of dread. Chevy!! Build it now and people will buy, From the Movie "Field of Musclecars"
      • 7 Years Ago
      Why bother showing us uncovered prototype then?
        • 7 Years Ago
        Because there was so much p*ssing and moaning about how the "hips were gone" and the "lines were soft" and "everything had changed" on the disguised prototypes it was worth it to show an undisguised car to shut people up.
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