• Dec 13, 2007
Vehicular lighting is a crapshoot. Some vehicles offer a great swath of even coverage from their headlamps, while others make you feel like you're squinting through welding goggles at night. I went through the trouble to retrofit one of my cars with Cibié lamps running overwattage H4 bulbs. That effort required a couple hundred dollars of parts, a good amount of labor to wire up relays and triggers, and not everyone is willing to expend such time and money, even if it means you won't overdrive your lights so easily. Sweden's Visualeyes has trotted out the Rayzer, an auxiliary lighting system that mounts from the inside and projects a beam through the windshield. We're taking the product's SEMA appearance as an indication of legality in the US. From the amount of end-user modifications we see on a daily basis, nobody's enforcing the rules on lights, anyway. The system has been patented and was developed by former race car driver Lars Svelander after a close call with a deer.
The line-of-sight position is purported to be more effective and has the benefit of leaving the outward appearance unmarred. We'd be worried about throwing light spill onto the hood, or too close to the front of the car, for that matter. Too much light in the wrong place is a detriment to night vision, but putting more lumens down the road could improve your chances of not overdoing it. The Rayzer uses a pair of HID bulbs and is wired into the car's lighting system to illuminate when the high beams are in use. There's also a fail-safe circuit that will shut the Rayzer off if oncoming vehicles are detected – a good thing when you're blasting light through your windshield. No price has been announced, but trading the hours of cutting, crimping, and snaking wires for the ease of a 15-minute installation by a non professional sounds good to us, especially if it works as well as the pictures make it appear.

Thanks for the tip, Andreas!

[Source: Visualeyes]


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  • 16 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      And if I mount those lights up behind my rearview then where will I put the EasyPass transponder?

      I think I'll stick with my Hellas
      • 7 Years Ago
      Not to worry about being blinded by the Rayzer. Unless the light can be removed and concealed each time the vehicle is parked anywhere but in the owner's garage, it will be stolen with such regularity that sales will dry up faster than a tax rate cut after a Democrat President is elected.
      • 7 Years Ago
      the more products that automatically dim the brights with oncoming headlights, though, the better. GM had the Autronic Eye in the mid-50s, but absolutely nothing similar or better (other than this) has come along since.

      And I'm not buying the claim that it won't obstruct visibility.
        • 7 Years Ago
        I remember a Lincoln MK III or IV with a similar device mounted on the driver's side near the base of the windshield. Obviously, these genius inventors never had a jacked-up 4x4 tailgate them at night with the headlights directly at eye level.
      • 7 Years Ago
      you can (possibly) upgrade your cars headlights without as much effort. on my ford focus, i was dissatisfied with the H4 based low/high beam combo lights it came with (in north america).

      i sourced ford headlights for the focus ST170 model from germany - they have an H1/H7 separate bulb and separate reflector system. since the car (at least in 2001) was almost identical to it's european cousin, they were a bolt-on with a bit of soldering fun to mate to the north american harness.

      not all north american cars have a european equivalent (nor has the focus since the 2005 redesign) but it may be an option.

      of note: don't get headlights from the UK. they drive on the other side -- and the lighting will be biased the wrong way (it will blind oncoming drivers instead of illuminating the shoulder)
      • 7 Years Ago
      This is a horrible idea. People will screw up the installs and Ill be getting blinded by cars behind me.
      • 7 Years Ago
      be warned, if you buy these, most other drivers will not like you.
      • 7 Years Ago
      The unit is instantly dismounted so you can obviously remove and conceal rayzer each time the vehicle is parked. You can also share it between family vehicles.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I'm not a big fan of headlights that lean toward the blue end of the spectrum. Shorter wavelength, scatters in fog and rain, much worse to look at for oncoming drivers.

      I have Hella E-code lamps in two vehicles, one has Hella Yellow-Star bulbs 70-85 watt; the other has Hella 80-100, but I need to wire up the relays to get full brightness.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I wish cars did have options for driving lights.

      I am curious, though... if it has sensors to cut the lights for on-coming traffic, how does it handle being turned off and on? I thought HIDs didn't like that much power cycling.

      If it does work, and turns off with your high beams off, and automatically cuts out if it sees oncoming traffic, it might not be that bad for other drivers. You don't follow people with brights on anyway. At least you shouldn't.

      Glare in the windsheild, foreground light washing, and other effects might not be that great for the driver, though.

      It has an angled bezel, but that angle may not be ideal, and it may not seal to the glass all that well, which will leak some reflection from the inside of the glass, and improper aim.

      I could see cops using something like this on un-marked cars, or cars with interior lighting.

      But me, I think I will stick to factory lights, and factory fog lights, and aftermarket driving lights, if the high beams aren't good enough. And mount them on the outside. I wish cars still had factory options for both, like some Porsches used to.

      Halogen Infra-Red (HIR) seem to be a better choice for often-switched high beams and driving lights, over HIDs which don't like to be so often shut down and turned back on. HIDs make more sense for sharply cut-off low beams.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I saw this at SEMA, and immediately recoiled in horror. Missaimed lights, improper installation, etc. Most D.I.Y.s can't install spoiler mounted fog and driving lights without blinding everone in front of them, and now we want to mount them at eye height?

      The porcine aviation department is checking the legality of them now...
      • 7 Years Ago
      Biggest issue I see is that your chances of getting light pollution on the hood of the car is almost unavoidable. Also, HID lights throw a ton of UV, which could degrade the polyester film that's between the bonded layers of your windshield.
      Darkmastyr- if some d/w installed these rear facing, it would interfere with their window tint, fo they would either be considerably dimmer of there'd be very ugly holes in the tint.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Biggest issue I see is that your chances of getting light pollution on the hood of the car is almost unavoidable. Also, HID lights throw a ton of UV, which could degrade the polyester film that's between the bonded layers of your windshield.
      Darkmastyr- if some d/w installed these rear facing, it would interfere with their window tint, fo they would either be considerably dimmer of there'd be very ugly holes in the tint.
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