• Sep 19, 2007
click above image for high-res gallery of the 2008 Toyota Land Cruiser

The all-new 2008 Toyota Land Cruiser unveiled yesterday will arrive next month in U.S. dealerships with an all-new price tag that's a hefty 12.4% more than the model it replaces. With a base price of $63,200, the '08 Land Cruiser will ring in $6,985 more than the 2007 model. As we guessed yesterday, the U.S.-spec Land Cruiser will be sold with the Tundra's 5.7L V8 producing 381 HP and 401 ft-lbs. of torque. Power will be divided by a six-speed automatic transmission and this decidedly full-size ute will be able to tow a max of 8,500 lbs., a full 2,000 more than last year's model. That's great, but is it worth an additional $7,000?

But wait, there's more. The '08 Cruiser also has a new suspension up front, a high-mount double-wishbone independent system with a trick Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System that can disengage the stabilizer bars for more articulation. Unfortunately, the rear is still a live-axle, and thus the third row doesn't fold flat, nor does it look very comfortable hovering mere inches off the floor. Both the second and third rows do swing out of the way to reveal a flat cargo floor, their presence even when folded up consumes a lot of useable space.

Toyota has released a full 75 high-res images of the 2008 Land Cruiser, which we've assembled for you in the gallery below. As the tipper pointed out to us, it's interesting that Lexus hasn't announced pricing for its version of this vehicle, the LX570, especially considering the sizable increase in the Toyota's price. How much higher will the Lexus version go?

Thanks for the tip, Woody!

[Source: Toyota]



PRESS RELEASE:

Toyota Announces Pricing For All-New Land Cruiser

September 18, 2007 – Torrance, CA - Toyota Motor Sales (TMS), U.S.A., Inc., announced manufacturer's suggested retail prices (MSRP) today for the all-new 2008 Land Cruiser full-size sport utility vehicle (SUV). Now in its seventh generation, the legendary Land Cruiser continues to carry its incomparable reputation for quality, durability and reliability.

The Land Cruiser, with its incredible reliability and capability, is the iconic vehicle that helped Toyota gain its first foothold in the world automobile market. Over the years, it has evolved from a basic four-wheel-drive utility vehicle into an upscale vehicle with the capability of the original Land Cruiser with the comfort and convenience that would rival any luxury sedan. The new Land Cruiser takes those values several steps further than ever before.

The Land Cruiser cements its reputation as the "King of Off-Road" with systems and features that also make it the "King of On-Road." An all-new 5.7-liter V8 engine and six-speed electronically controlled automatic transmission with a sequential shift mode delivers unparalleled power, efficiency and smoothness. The most powerful V8 in the Toyota model lineup delivers 381 horsepower and 401 lb-ft of torque and carries a ULEV-II emissions status. Maximum towing capacity is 8,500 pounds, an increase of 2,000 pounds over the previous model.

The Land Cruiser receives a new high-mount double-wishbone independent front suspension and four-link rear suspension with a solid live axle. The front suspension includes tubular gas-pressure shock absorbers, a hollow stabilizer bar, and coil springs. The purpose of this system is to achieve a high level of off-road driving performance and suspension control while maintaining a high level of on-road driving comfort.

Enhancing this advanced suspension system is a sophisticated Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System (KDSS) for an improved ride and off-road capability. A Toyota first, KDSS affectively varies the stiffness of the anti-sway bars to provide a unique mixture of optimal on-road roll stiffness and off-road suspension compliance.

Applying all of Land Cruiser's new technology to the driving surface are P285/60 R18 mud-and-snow steel-belted radial tires mounted on 18 x 8.0-inch aluminum alloy wheels with a high-gloss finish.

The Land Cruiser comes replete with a wide variety of systems designed to help maintain the safety and security of the vehicle's driver and passengers. Like all Toyota SUVS, the Land Cruiser comes standard with the STAR safety system featuring a four-wheel multi-terrain anti-lock braking system (ABS), Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD), Brake Assist (BA), Active Traction Control (A-TRAC), and Vehicle Stability Control (VSC).

The new Land Cruiser features 10 airbags, the most airbags found in any Toyota vehicle. These include driver and front passenger dual-stage advanced airbags; driver and front passenger knee airbags; front- and second-row seat-mounted side airbags; and three-row roll-sensing side curtain airbags with a roll-sensing cutoff switch.

To this arsenal of impressive safety tools, the Land Cruiser adds other new standard safety features: CRAWL Control, a direct tire pressure monitor system (TPMS), and front active headrests.

The CRAWL Control system improves Land Cruiser's off-road capabilities and allows the driver to further concentrate on choosing a line without also having to manage momentum. With the transfer case shifted into low range, CRAWL controls engine speed and output, along with braking force, to propel the vehicle forward or in reverse at one of three low-speed settings.

The Land Cruiser also features many more thoughtful standard details. These include a JBL premium audio system with an in-dash six-CD/DVD changer and 14 speakers; Smart Key keyless entry; anti-theft security system; push-button start which allows the driver to unlock or start the vehicle by simply carrying the key fob on their person; engine immobilizer; cruise control; power moonroof; electrochomic rearview and side mirrors; HomeLink®; steering wheel-mounted audio, telephone, and voice recognition controls; heated, power front seats with driver's memory; and power tilt and telescopic steering column with memory.

With its vast array of additional standard equipment and numerous technological upgrades, the MSRP for the 2008 Land Cruiser is $63,200, an increase of $6,985, or 12.4 percent over the previous model.

The seventh-generation Land Cruiser will begin arriving at Toyota dealerships in mid-to-late October.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 31 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      too bad, I was gonna buy one, but almost $70K? I stick with the Range Rover any day!
      • 7 Years Ago
      Toyota trucks are way too expensive. The Highlander is now priced the same as the 4Runner..... it's ridiculous... The Rav4 is also pretty damaging on the wallet....... car prices are really ridiculously high and the trend doesn,t look like it'S gonna reverse any time soon....
      • 7 Years Ago
      $63,000?! And I thought the Lexus version was a waste. I understand the thing can take on the
      • 7 Years Ago
      I'm wondering why it's "unfortunate" that the new Land Cruiser has a solid rear axle. This is (in theory) a vehicle built to be able to travel properly in tough terrain situations. A fully independent suspension will be inadequate to maintain traction when things get rough.

      Solid axles are helpful when needing to navigate rougher land. There's a reason that old Land Cruisers (as well as Jeep Wranglers) were equipped with solid axles front and back. While you sacrifice on-road ride quality you're making the vehicle infinitely more capable off-road by going solid axle.

      The only reason I can see the rear suspension being to the vehicle's detriment is if you're expecting to see Toyota make a full equivalent of a Ford Expedition. Toyota didn't want to spend the R&D to invent an IRS solution for their truck-based vehicle.

        • 7 Years Ago
        You can design a fully independent suspension to do all the things a solid/beam axle do fairly easily. Land Rover has been doing it since 2002 with the Current MY Range Rover and the LR3/RRS use a similar, but slightly more advanced, version of that suspension.

        The fact that Toyota didn't bother to design a full independent suspension for both the front and rear that could do well on road and off road is purely a matter of money.

        It was cheaper to do it this way but not better.


        The LR3 has 13 inches of rear wheel travel. How much does this supposed superior Land Cruiser have?
        • 7 Years Ago
        Umm, the _old_ Land Cruiser was a real workhorse designed to be used off-road. It was small enough that it wouldn't be getting in its own way, with the diesel engine frugal enough that you wouldn't need to cart around a fuel station to the outback, inboard headlights, etc etc. The _new_ Land Cruiser got a huge overdose of fatass-itis. They share a name but that's it.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Not pointing fingers at you particularly but why is it that Toyota comes out with a 63k base priced vehicle with a solid rear axle and everyone tells of the number of reasons it's better that way?

        Meanwhile, Ford releases a 16k base price pony car with a solid rear axle and everyone jumps on them for being low tech?
        • 7 Years Ago
        Mike,
        Two different vehicles designed for two different purposes regardless of how people are using them. Isn't the pony car supposed to be a performance vehicle of some sort? Live axels don't go around corners as well as independent.
      • 7 Years Ago
      The increase comes mostly from the fact that there are almost no options. In 2007- the sunroof, side airbags, adjustable trick suspension, spoilers, running boards, NAV & DVD were all outside of the base price. Only the NAV & DVD are now. They did much this same thing several years ago when they simply took a bunch of options that you couldn't avoid if you wanted to and made them all standard. (ABS, 3rd row seat, etc etc)
      • 7 Years Ago
      A large Highlander for $63,000, you should at least get 2 of them.
      • 7 Years Ago
      wow....i don't know how else to put it... what's with front and rear lights that stick out 6 inches past the body panels? that seems real smart for off-road adventures... so ugly... it may be a comfortable suspension setup, but last time i rode in one, it felt really floaty, much more so that what you find in an equally-comfortable land rover with an IRS... let's be honest, the Jones' aren't going to be taking this thing onto roads much worse than the salted snowy roads of downtown Aspen...
      • 7 Years Ago
      That promotional photo of a Land Cruiser plowing over a mud pile is kinda funny. That's the dirtiest mall parking lot I've ever seen.
      • 7 Years Ago
      • 7 Years Ago
      I don't see it as so unfortunate that the Land Cruiser has a solid rear axel. This is the off-road vehicle of choice for people around the world who live in areas where paved roads are just empty promises for the future. A solid axel, in theory, gives the car superior off-roading ability and is simpler to maintain. If some suburban soccer moms have to deal with the slight inconvenience of a third row that doesn't fold flat in a car that is far larger than they need in the first place, that's no problem to me. If anything is a pity, it's that the Land Cruiser has steadily become more complicated and expensive over the years. I always wonder if it is now out-of-reach for the large numbers of people who have come to rely on these Toyotas for decades.
      • 7 Years Ago
      So, if this one has gone up 12.4%, then what can we expect of the all-mighty Lexus? That would put it in the range of at least 75 to 80 large ... before options!
      • 7 Years Ago
      who in there right mind would pay 63k for this, much less 10-20k more for a set of "L" logos???

      If i wanted a bar of soap on wheels i would've called ivory.

      Range Rover FTW....

      ide rather be stuck on the side of the road in style than make it to wherever i was trying to go in this thing
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