• Sep 7, 2007
Click for photo gallery

It might look very similar to the Zonda F it's replacing, but in truth, there's only about 10% carryover from Horacio Pagani's previous creation to his latest. No matter. Awesome is awesome, regardless of everything else, and the Zonda R belongs next to the term in the dictionary. As these latest computer renderings show, the carbon fiber-bodied Zonda R looks like some kind of formidable stealth weapon. Unfortunately for drivers, it most certainly is NOT invisible to radar, and this 7.3-liter, 750 horsepower, 523 lb-ft beast is more than capable of lighting up police-issue units with ridiculous numbers. Power is directed to the wheels via a six-speed sequential gearbox. Autogespot puts the price at around €2 Million (in the Netherlands, including taxes), which means it will be garage ornamentation for a very select few.

This thing looks like it could go out and compete at Le Mans out of the box., and for €2,000,000, maybe Pagani should throw in a pit crew, too. Enjoy the five new renderings like the one above that we've added to the gallery.

[Source: Autogespot]


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  • 17 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      speechless....

      talk about a fantasy car....
      • 7 Years Ago
      Is cargasm a word? I think I just had one.
      • 7 Years Ago
      eh. i'm not the ostantatious supercar buyer so my opinion doesn't matter but this thing looks like it was cobbled together in a backyard garage based on blueprints fished off a video game.

      it lacks the 'finished' look of other supercars on the market with these tacky add ons bolted on all over the place. and that silly looking rear end on the Zonda up till now looks even sillier on this new one.

      i would expect this thing not at the Nordschleife but at Hot Import Nights. hit it with some neon lights, get those cotton fake peel out 'smoke' around the tires and it's a trophy winner!
      • 7 Years Ago
      The price of 2 million is in Holland including all taxes ;)
      So the price @ the factory door will be much lower..
      lets say 1,5 / 1,6 million
        • 7 Years Ago
        Great news! I'm looking forward to picking it up at Costco. :)

      • 7 Years Ago
      I'm in love with the performance, and the exoticness, and the attention that come with a Pagani, but that thing looks ugly. Especially the wing.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Oh and by wondering how they make money, I just meant that few people are able to buy them, not few people actually want them.
        • 7 Years Ago
        one thing I've learned delving into the automotive world is that there are a lot more rich people out there than I thought. And by rich I mean multimillionaires, of course.
        • 7 Years Ago
        @daniel, flea

        I have to agree with flea. At last count forbes found 964 billionaires in the world. While I don't have numbers for how many multi-millionaires there are, you can imagine that even with a $50 million cut off you are quite literally going to find thousands of people who can easily afford multiple supercars.

        Having been to the pagani factory I can tell you that it is really a tiny operation. There are only about 40 people working there (as of 2005) and most were manufacturing. There were hardly 10 or so engineers and the rest were marketing, etc. So inherently their overheads are reasonably low.

        Then you get in to the fact that with something like the Pagani, you are probably doing a lot of your reliability testing on a bench rather than building 10 cars and taking them to the Arctic and Death valley. So there is some added savings there. For example, I believe they only had 2 actual test vehicles for the Zonda F.

        Finally, I think the fact that since the Pagani C12, all the models have been quite evolutionary and built of improvements to the previous model's chassis, engine etc . means that the major chassis development costs is being spread out over a large number of units. Of course that does not mean that each time they evolve they don't need to spend money, but it is usually targeting individual areas such as springs, dampers, maybe adding stiffness at certain sections etc. Again as an example, the Zonda F chassis was made stiff by using carbon fibre with a 3D weave as opposed to the previous 2D weave (Basically, think of threads being weaved to make cloth, now think about how adding fibres that go top to bottom across the thickness of the cloth would make it stronger). So in that regard while they made other changes too, without doing a complete redesign of the chassis and just by making that one change, they improved the dynamic performance of the car by quite a bit.

        Anyway, I won't blabber and bore any longer. Hope that helps.
        -Sledge
      • 7 Years Ago
      I think this may be one of those love it or hate it cars.

      I hate it. There's no elegance there. It's a hammer, and it looks like a hammer. It's built to go fast and race, and that's exactly what it looks like.

      On the other hand, you've got the Veyron, Ferraris, Porches and Lambos that look like you're meant to love staring at them as much as driving them. The Veyron looks like pure luxury and elegance.

      The Veyron's a hammer, but it looks like down-filled pillow.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Did someone say Honda Type R?
      • 7 Years Ago
      that is a true hypercar
      it has the outragous price tag and looks and speeed

      it has it alll

      that thing is insane!
      • 7 Years Ago
      This looks rather like a GT1 racer, or even more, like the former LM GTP cars. Doesn't quite seem to be a road car, except for the regular interior in one of the renderings. Perhaps the R in its name, actually means something?
      • 7 Years Ago
      I hate wings, I hate exposed carbon fiber due to its overuse in the aftermarket, but I love this car!
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