• Aug 29, 2007
At one time Japanese regulations prohibited engines in that country producing more than 274hp, and oddly enough a wide array of different engines were all rated at that same level. Given the actual performance of the cars, it was clear that many manufacturers were sandbagging. Audi appears set to do the same with its uber-powerful RS6. The twin-turbo V10 is expected to carry an official rating of 571 hp, but the actual output could be as high as 610hp. Does anyone actually need this much power in a sedan or wagon? Of course not, but sign us up anyway.
[Source: Motor Authority]


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  • 21 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      600+hp twin turbo V10?!?!?! Good lawd!

      Let's just HOPE this is the same powerplant that goes into the more potent Audi R8. Now THAT would be one helluva car. Props to Audi.
      • 7 Years Ago
      This will be a perfect, overpowered car for the likes of Hulk Hogan's offspring to wrap around unsuspecting (hopefully inanimate) objects.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Audi has also made great efforts to improve handling and sporting balance of the upcoming A5/S5 and A4 by moving the engines further back in the vehicle. This will push the front/rear weight ratio closer to 50/50. In the past this has been one of the main reasons that Audis have tended to understeer. I look forward to trying them out!
      • 7 Years Ago
      I guess that depends on what you call high horse power. There are no 600 horse power VW's, neither is there anything like that from Volvo, Saab, or the Mini for that matter. You ask why you don't see any of the lower powered European cars in the US. Ask Ford why they don't bring in the KA. Ask any of the so called big three why they don't support any of the low mileage diesels and, as long as you complain about some of the specialty, high horse powwer cars from Europe, why don't you question the onslaught of high horse power SUVs in the US or pick ups with absurdly high horse powwer. At least the high horse power European manufacturers have also high mileage cars to offer, and I don't consider 30 mpg high mileage. So, as a whole, who has the more sensible line up of cars?
      • 7 Years Ago
      Is it really gonna have that much horsepower? I'm not complaining, but the pattern among BMW, MB, and Audi is to edge each other out by just a tad, and not to blow the other competition out of the water when it comes to horsepower.

      Edging each other out seems like the smarter way to go, because I would think it would be more effective in stringing the consumer along. Perhaps, anyways.

        • 7 Years Ago
        Mercedes already reached 582hp with the CLK 55 DTM AMG and the CLK 55 DTM AMG convertible... ... with 610hp they tip it a little bit..
      • 7 Years Ago
      I think this is awesome. Not because I'd ever own or buy the car (and I'll do my damnedest to talk my father out of trading his E55 in on one, should he get the desire to do so), but because it will prompt a reaction from MB and BMW.

      A supercharger slapped on top of the 6.3L AMG engine, perhaps... Or maybe a twin turbo M5. *drool*
      • 7 Years Ago
      Mighty impressive. But I do wish Audi would concentrate on making there cars more involving to drive instead of jacking up the headline power figure. They need to strike the right balance before they can compete with BMW.
        • 7 Years Ago
        @B Monty

        Wow! Quite a read. I feel sleepy now.

        Is all that stuff necessary? I mean, I just wanna really drive the car--myself.
        • 7 Years Ago
        They've already done that - they are called the R8 and the RS4.

        They have also announced adjustable dynamic steering response in their new A5 and new A4 lines. Apparently you can set it to steer with the effort of a Cadilac or the effort of a Sportscar. It also automatically assists to keep the handling neutral by dialing out oversteer and understeer.

        Audi drive select – up to four different cars in one
        Those who drive the A4 hard and enthusiastically can choose between two sports suspension settings, or alternatively rely on an innovative technology – the innovative system known as Audi drive select. This is available in various stages, which influence an increasing number of technical components and functions on the car: accelerator pedal response, tiptronic shift points, power steering assistance, the steering ratio and the action of the electronically adjustable shock absorbers – another new feature.
        The driver can select the comfort, auto or dynamic modes at switches on the centre console. If the A4 is equipped with the MMI control system, a fourth mode, “Individual”, is available; this enables an individual profile of 24 settings to be configured. Audi drive select transforms a single A4 into up to four different cars – a range of driving pleasure, dynamism and ride comfort that is unmatched in the midsize car category. Check it out from their 2008 A4 press release below:
        ----------------------------------------------------
        Audi drive select – up to four different cars in one

        Those who drive the A4 hard and enthusiastically can choose between two sports suspension settings, or alternatively rely on an innovative technology – the innovative system known as Audi drive select. This is available in various stages, which influence an increasing number of technical components and functions on the car: accelerator pedal response, tiptronic shift points, power steering assistance, the steering ratio and the action of the electronically adjustable shock absorbers – another new feature.
        The driver can select the comfort, auto or dynamic modes at switches on the centre console. If the A4 is equipped with the MMI control system, a fourth mode, “Individual”, is available; this enables an individual profile of 24 settings to be configured. Audi drive select transforms a single A4 into up to four different cars – a range of driving pleasure, dynamism and ride comfort that is unmatched in the midsize car category.


        As fast as a professional rally driver –Audi dynamic steering

        The new A4 features yet another pioneering technological development: Audi dynamic steering. Its key element is a superimposed gear system that alters the overall ratio according to road speed and the chosen Audi drive select setting. This concentric-shaft steering gear is extremely compact and light in weight; it has a precise action free from any slack. It was first developed for use in robots and for space travel applications; the expedition vehicles on which it was installed have already traversed the surface of the moon and Mars.

        Audi dynamic steering makes the steering ratio more direct at low speeds, with a higher level of power assistance. This renders the steering extremely light when manoeuvring, and only two turns of the wheel are needed from lock to lock. As the car’s speed increases, however, the steering ratio becomes gradually less direct and in parallel with this the amount of power assistance is reduced. At high motorway speeds the A4 can therefore be driven smoothly and has excellent straight-line stability.

        Audi’s high-tech steering can do even more. It is closely networked with the ESP and therefore receives precise information about the car’s attitude as the handling limit is approached. If the A4 threatens to oversteer, for instance after an abrupt avoidance manoeuvre, the steering performs slight corrective impulses in the direction needed to reduce this tendency. Such corrective action takes place faster than even an experienced rally driver could react. This rapid response means that brake applications are often not needed, so that the car continues its journey more smoothly and dynamically.

        The system also takes action if the car understeers: it selects a more indirect steering ratio for a short time, the aim being to prevent the driver from turning the steering beyond the point at which the tyres still have plenty of road grip. With these capabilities, Audi dynamic steering represents leading-edge technology in this car market segment.

        The optional-extra damping control permits individual suspension setting
      • 7 Years Ago
      The other half of that title is "iiiitttttttt!!!!"
      • 7 Years Ago
      Kevin,

      Just to clarify, Audi does not do SMG, BMW does. Audi has the DSG (or S Tronic now), it's the dual clutch gear box.......shifts faster than you can do manually :0
        • 7 Years Ago
        I'm aware of that; I was referring to the 810hp M5 that someone linked to beneath my original post, which does have a SMG transmission (at least judging by the blurry, hard-to-distinguish shape of the shifter in the interior shot)
      • 7 Years Ago
      Audi seems to be unstoppable lately. The new TT's are much better cars than their predecessors, the R8 is amazing, and now this! If it's anything like it's little sister the RS4, I would sell myself to science to buy one. (That last comment was a joke, of course.)
      • 7 Years Ago
      Wake me up when they change the story. When cars can handle 2+ G's lateral.
      • 7 Years Ago
      So while the American car makers are now committed towards following Japan's lead in fuel-efficient vehicles, the Germans are making cars where 300HP seems to the base engine! Havn't the manufacturers heard of the upcoming EU CO2 regulations?
        • 7 Years Ago
        Do you actually ever look what is availbale on the German market? The US manufacturers have a long way to go before they can even come close the the fuel efficiency of at least 50% of the cars on the road in Germany and in Europe for that matter.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Just because a car is higher-powered, it doesn't means it spits out more emissions. Porsche is a testament to that. It looks like the "big/small three" haven't figured that out yet.
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