• Aug 15th 2007 at 12:34PM
  • 12
As the Ford Hydrogen Fusion 999 works at breaking the 200 mph barrier out on the Bonneville Salt Flats this week, a more mainstream newcomer to the Fusion lineup has been spotted testing. We were told some time ago by Ford that their next hybrid models in the form of the Fusion and Mercury Milan would be dropping toward the end of this year, the only question is whether it will be at Los Angeles in November or Detroit in January. It looks like the whole 2009 Fusion lineup will get a refresh starting with the hybrid. New headlights and a bolder version of the three bar grille will grace the nose while the interior gets redone as well. Under the hood the hybrid drivetrain will be based on the one in the Escape/Mariner hybrid.
[Source: Jalopnik]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 12 Comments
      • 8 Years Ago
      Actually, Ford has had its own Escape Hybrids running up to 300k as taxis, so the design is proven. However, the difference with this model is that Ford will be using batteries from a new supplier, from what I understand. Sanyo limited Ford to 20,000 batteries per year, which has led to terrible shortages of the Escape Hybrid (basically, you can't find any at dealers anymore) but their new supplier will allow Ford to produce additional units.

      It's unclear how this battery will compare to the one in the Escape, but Ford has been testing since at least the middle of last year, so it should be ok.

      Also, just to clarify, it is my understanding that the new engine with the hybrid will be the new 2.5L that Ford has been developing.
      • 8 Years Ago
      Mike you're confused. The production Fusion hybrid does not use hydrogen. Only the Fusion 999 runs on hydrogen. The hybrid is a standard gas electric system.
      • 8 Years Ago
      I like the Green movement, but come on, Ford: How about your 1.4 or 1.6 clean diesels in lieu of the whole hybrid mess? Get them to meet Tier2/Bin5 regulations (a-la Honda, without urea injection)and I would buy one in a heartbeat! Gas/battery hybrids just don't get the mpg that a small displacement diesel would, and the long-term battery issues are still up in the air as to when they'll conk out, replacement cost, and disposal.

      I guess I just like diesels, and it makes me sick to see that Europe gets them and we don't.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Diesel is 75% higher? Diesel can be had here in Chicagoland for under $3 per gallon TODAY, while regular unleaded is about $2.35 per gallon which is about a 30% difference. Yes, the price gap between the two fluctuates considerably at times, and a huge difference certainly can wipe out any diesel-derived cost advantages.

        Just one thing to remember: We're still using less foreign oil. Period.
        • 6 Years Ago
        I used to be pro-diesel in 1980. Rabbit diesels got 50 mpg

        things have changed.

        diesel is 75% higher than what gas is now, making any cost benefit of diesel evaporate

        complicated emissions controls to meet the higher standards

        direct injection gas engines get the same type of fuel economy benefit without all the necessary emissions issues

        Subsidized diesel in Europe made it more beneficial for European diesels.

        Diesels are necessary for certain torque requirements for a certain package. Small diesels on trucks who have to tow are a prime example. Small diesels in commercial equipment to move earth and other large things are another great example.

      • 8 Years Ago
      From:
      http://www.toyota.com/about/environment/technology/2004/hybrid.html

      "Toyota has a comprehensive battery recycling program in place and has been recycling nickel-metal hydride batteries since the RAV4 Electric Vehicle was introduced in 1998. Every part of the battery, from the precious metals to the plastic, plates, steel case and the wiring, is recycled. To ensure that batteries come back to Toyota, each battery has a phone number on it to call for recycling information and dealers are paid a $200 "bounty" for each battery."

      If people are scouring the streets for 5 cent cans and bottles, it's not too difficult to imagine mechanics and junkyard operators claiming the $200 bucks for a used battery in any condition. Also, NiMH batteries are far less harmful when disposed of than lead-acid.

      Finally, regarding battery life, the same web page says this:

      "Since the car went on sale in 2000, Toyota has not replaced a single battery for wear and tear."

      - Bob R.
      • 8 Years Ago
      Come on Ford.
      A Hydrogen Hybrid?
      Give me a break, this is PURELY Green PR BS.
      Give us a Diesel.
      Or a Hybrid or a Diesel Hybrid.
      Who's going to pay for the installation of Hydrogen Filling Stations, Ford?
      I'm Sick of the Hydrogen BullS**t already.
      • 8 Years Ago
      First of all, Dave, I think it's a little deceptive to compare specifically *small* displacement diesels at 1.4 and 1.6L to the type of engine that would go into a mid-size car like the Fusion, the Camry, or small SUVs like the Escape.

      All of that category of hybrids use gasoline engines with displacements of 2.3L.

      A more fair comparison would be a hybrid with a small displacement gasoline engine, such as the Prius, with a 1.5L atkinson. Paired with that type of engine, hybrids can achieve mileages in the 50 MPG range, which is anything but lackluster.

      Furthermore, you make it sound like after some period in time, the hybrid battery will simply stop working, rendering the car inoperable. This is simply not true. Even if the battery begins to be worn down, the result will be a reduction in battery performance, but all that will mean is that the gas engine will have to be used more often in the later years of the car's life. The batteries won't simply "conk out."
      • 8 Years Ago
      Come on Ford.
      A Hydrogen Hybrid?
      Give me a break, this is PURELY Green PR BS.
      Give us a Diesel.
      Or a Hybrid or a Diesel Hybrid.
      Who's going to pay for the installation of Hydrogen Filling Stations, Ford?
      I'm Sick of the Hydrogen BullS**t already.
      • 8 Years Ago
      (This may be a re-post - my last attempt did not come through)

      Dave -

      Are you sure that Diesels perform better MPG-wise when all other factors are equal, including acceleration, vehicle size, and price? I've seen clean Diesel specs which rival the Prius (for example) but with slower acceleration or a smaller vehicle size, or Turbo models with a higher price. I'd like to see more Diesels, too, but I don't think they are inherently superior to hybrids in all cases.

      Regarding battery technology, NiMH has proven itself highly reliable. Toyota has had Prius models on the road for 10 years now with no significant battery failure issues. Recent model Priuses use as taxis have achieved over 250K miles in city driving without battery problems.

      Ford's hybrid system is similar in many respects to Toyotas (both companies cross-license some patents) and there is no reason to believe that a hybrid Fusion would necessarily have any battery problems.

      - Bob R.
      • 8 Years Ago
      But honestly, what happens to all those NiMH batteries when they peter out?

      Are they recycled 100%? I can't imagine this.
      • 8 Years Ago
      Looking good so far. Lets hope that Ford gets their act together and the Fusion Hybrid is competitive with the Toyota Camry Hybrid.


      I have been seeing more Ford hybrid commercials on TV. Last night I saw one for the Mariner.
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