• Jul 13, 2007
If we're honest, most decisions in the business world, especially in the auto industry, aren't made for altruistic reasons. Money is the name of the game, and as the environment is becoming a much talked about issue around the dinner table, many automakers are realizing that it's in their best interest, financially speaking, to develop greener vehicles.

Craig Bramscher, the CEO of Brammo Motorsports, which builds the Ariel Atom in the U.S., seems to have changed the course of his company's direction based on the revelation that it could be making less of an impact on the environment. Brammo had been developing a new supercar called the Rogue GT that was to be powered by a V12 engine swilling gasoline like there was no tomorrow. Since Bramscher has realized there is a tomorrow, however, he's changed the product plan to make the supercar all-electric and renamed it the Enertia GT. This could be the beginning of a lineup of EV vehicles from Brammo, as it just unveiled an all-electric motorcycle last week called the Enertia. While the Enertia GT is likely to have a lower top speed than the Rogue GT due to the switch, acceleration is expected to improve. There's no word on what type of batteries the car will use or how far it will go on a charge, either.

While one could certainly question Bramscher's motivation for going green (one might argue you can attract more attention with an electric supercar than it could with one powered by a V12 engine), it appears the CEO just grew a soft spot for Mother Earth and is changing his dirty ways.

[Source: Winding Road]


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  • 26 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      And it's not just because Wrightspeed already did the R&D for them, right?

      http://www.wrightspeed.com/x1.html
        • 7 Years Ago
        They did do a pretty good job!
      • 7 Years Ago
      Well it would make a change from building an "American super car", as Winding Road described the Atom.
      • 7 Years Ago
      actually I thought these things were Honda 4 cyl Civic engines, Not V12s.. or atleast the first ones were 4 cyl when they showed off one on Top Gear a while back. I also wonder why all the negativity on electric cars and hybrids.. If you actually did your research you'd see that they've massive potential if you gave them a chance.. but so many are too ignorant and arogant to give up their gas guzzling big engines (mainly the V8). I love these muscle cars and exotics as much as the next guy.. but unlike most I actually can see reality. not the fantasy world of unlimited cheap gas to fuel these beasts.. oil's runnin low. it's hurting the environment and alot of those cars get lousy mileage.. besides alot of electrics can smoke your big block and most can keep up with it (none of these home built for a couple buck things though) A good example is the PML's Mini cooper hybrid. 80 MPG and 640 BHP. naught to 60 in under 5 seconds.. that thing blows away vettes and porsches and yet it's a hybrid mostly electric..
      • 7 Years Ago
      I've known Craig since 2003 when he and his team did a very fine job of building an Ultima Can-Am for me. Craig is a serious car guy and a smart businessperson bringing his knowledge of the web/opensource world to the auto market. Worth keeping an eye on Brammo.
        • 7 Years Ago
        I have only conversed via email when Craig personally responded to a suggestion I had for the website. He really impressed me with that.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Dear Brammo,


      Please use AltairNano batteries.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I'm just curious how someone could NOT believe what Al Gore says? It's SCIENCE. You remember the scientific method from high school? Please enlighten me on all that training and education you received to refute tens of thousands of scientists and researchers whom have been studying human kind's effect on the planet for decades.

      I'm sure the average American's view on pollution and global warming would change overnight if CO2 and carbon monoxide were not odorless or invisible. But just like those millions of years of fossils pointing to evolution, the right will just continue to deny it, put the blinders on, and ride this horse until the earth is so polluted that we can no longer reproduce.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Electric cars = huge bucket 'o fail
        • 7 Years Ago
        Hmm. I could buy one Tesla, or two Lotus Elises, or four Miatas.

        This, my friends, is not a hard decision. Batteries=heavy.
        • 7 Years Ago
        As in the car company? Pffbt, fuel-powered Lotus Elise/Exige > That.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Tell that to Tesla...
        • 7 Years Ago
        The Tesla makes its own sound, it's a futuristic, turbine-like "fweeeee" sound. The motor redlines at 13,500 RPM so you can really wind it up into the stratosphere. If you don't like the sound, that is okay. . . Maybe it's not for you. I'm sure when the first cars were sold, some people rejected them because they couldn't live without the clip-clopping sound of horses' hooves.
        • 7 Years Ago
        A major aspect of driving a car for reasons beside being an appliance is the whole theatrical experience of it. An electric car gives you a silent woosh, an internal combustion car gives you all kinds of wonderful sounds and feelings as you pound through the gears, winding the engine up to the stratosphere. I really couldn't care less if batteries provide less hassle, or if it accelerates a tenth quicker, because the overall experience would simply be lacking a huge part of why I adore the automobile.
        • 7 Years Ago
        I really don't understand the negativity. If it lives up to what's been promised thus far, the Tesla should out-drag my Esprit V8, be more fun to drive in most respects, cost about the same new, and be much cheaper and less hassle to keep fueled and maintained. How is that not progress?
      • 7 Years Ago
      wow it has two seats!! it better be street legal.
      HotRodzNKustoms
      • 7 Years Ago
      A moment of silence for the death of another V-12 supercar concept.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Mechanical experimentation is fine. It's how we evolve our ideas. But of course greenies have no monetary vice. That's why so many of the leaders of this bowel movement are poised to make millions from environmental companies they've invested in.

      How does Al Gore justify his astronomic use of energy? Through "carbon credits" of course (see liberal, socialist scapegoat). Why he invests in "green" companies, you know, the ones he owns or has a major stake in. We're in the midst of a great climate calamity and we must change our ways now! But if you pay a carbon tax or credit, somehow the emergency can wait til tomorrow. What a freakin' pathetic con.
      • 7 Years Ago
      He just increase the cars production cost by 100% and did nothing to the environment. Batteries simply delay the contamination, it doesn't eliminate it; well that is unless we send all our used batteries to space?

      The Tesla sells for $90k and it is basically an overweight, short range, $50k Elise.

      If he really love the environment. Make the car twice as light and use an engine that is half the size with half the power.

        • 7 Years Ago
        You may be surprised to know that in the past fifty years, batteries have been recycled.
        • 7 Years Ago
        @ Turbofrog

        The engine/battery pack weights 1/3 of the Tesla car. And it uses the lightest type of battery installed so far in an electric car, of which use can only be called experimental at this point. Using a battery that can be mass produced for electric cars today would bring the weight of the pack to half of that of the car (for the quoted range).

        I hope that you realize now that in order to put the same electric pack in a regular sedan will double that car's weight. How efficient do you think such a car will be? Remember, we are talking about the efficiency of a moving vehicle, not of a stationary engine.

        This is where all the alternatives to the gasoline engine fail, diesels, hybrids, electric cars: they are more efficient engines, but make much heavier vehicles, and therefore are not more efficient as vehicles.

        Instead of paying for more expensive vehicles that bring no real advantage in fuel economy, companies should spend that money on lowering the weight of the vehicles. Imagine that instead of putting an electric pack in Lotus Elise, the way Tesla does for twice the money, they would have halved the weight of the car, and use a smaller, less powerful engine, and still get the same performance.

        And don't forget, the gasoline engine can be brought close to diesel engine efficiency with some development (HCCI), but the diesel engine cannot be brought to the weight of the gasoline engine (with the same power rating).
      • 7 Years Ago
      I love how watermellons always report that another person has seen the light when they produce an electric car. (Like capitalists are only capitalists when they are doing what they don't like, then they're enlightened).

      The truth is there might be an economic opportunity preying on the sheeple who follow the trends. So you make an electric car not because you are ignorant and uninformed enough to believe what Al Gore says, but because you realize that the sheeple believe it -- so you get more press/exposure (and money) by making an electric, then you sell your IC versions even more (as well as making some money on the sheeple that think buying an electric racecar made with all sorts of toxic materials is somehow environmentally friendly).
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