• Jul 12, 2007
White cars may be a bit boring, but a recent study from The RAC Foundation showed that light-colored cars were up to 12-percent less likely to get into a serious accident than darker colored vehicles. Statistics also showed that the accidents that the lighter colored cars did get into were also less severe. The study was done in Australia with all accidents resulting in death, injury, or the car being towed between 1987 and 2004.

While light-colored cars were definitely safer, they also had a lower resale value. Over the 18 years covered in the study, white cars were worth up to £500 less than darker colors. Darker colors were also much more popular than colors on the other end of the spectrum, which helps explain why lighter colors commanded less money on resale. We guess only the white 2008 Taurus is the safest car in America.

[Source: WhatCar?]


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  • 35 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      This would be perfect to have around the neighborhood... Sweet Ride!!

      http://www.mandrelbend.com
      http://www.total-techs.com
      • 7 Years Ago
      Its probably more likely related to the fact that white cars are easier to see than..say..a forest green or black or even gray car, day or night. So accidents could be statistically lower because of that.
        • 7 Years Ago
        This is what I was thinking too.

        The other thing they did not take into consideration is a white car in a snow storm is not what you would want to be driving.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Just to add to this...

        In Canada, where we do get snow for 11.5 month of the year, a white car is sometimes more expensive to insure, depending on the insurer.

        In addition, Red is another colour that is more expensive, mostly because some cars that are red tend to be 'sportier' models, thus having different drivers who may take more risk.
      Some guy
      • 7 Years Ago
      It's these logical fallacies that make me wonder why illogical stories like this are even given merit. If the report would have mentioned that it was possibly due to the kind of drivers that drive white cars, or the ability to be seen easier, it would have some credibility. It's like saying out of all those cars, a majority of the cars were running on regular unleaded gas. Therefore, premium unleaded must be safer. Give me a break. This is why there are editors who's job is to make sure the article is clear and logical. Well, we all know someone was sleeping on the job.
      LH
      • 7 Years Ago
      I previously only drove darker colored vehicles (red, black, etc). When I purchased the current vehicle I drive, I went with white as the exterior color for a reason: it is spotted somewhat easier (to what degree, I don't have numbers but I do feel safer in it and many people I know who have purchased white exterior painted vehicles do as well). My driving habits haven't changed one bit - I still drive as fast as I did in darker colored vehicles and I don't have a boring lifestyle. So I think those two things are irrelevant to the whole study. I feel safer having to pass larger vehicles (semis, SUVs, trucks, etc) since they are more apt to see you with a light colored vehicle (at least there haven't been any issues I've encountered in the 3 years I've had this one). When I decide to purchase another vehicle in a number of years, it will be another white exterior. Just because this was done in Australia (and yes, it is under the British Monarchy along with Canada - being a History major it's common knowledge to know this), doesn't mean that it doesn't have some relation in other countries, such as the US for example. It's not perfect, but it is sort of indicative here. If you don't like the study, don't read up about it. No one is twisting your arm here.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Last I heard in the US, silver was the most popular color (not black). Black may be the favorite of many enthusiasts, but what sells large volume is silver (silver SUVs, silver minivans, silver Camrys... maybe black vettes, black Porches, black BMWs, etc.)... so statistically silver cars are probably "unsafe" (with black and red following next in line) just because more people drive them.
      Gary
      • 7 Years Ago
      This is TOTAL B. S. !!!!!!! I owned a bright white GMC shortbed 1500 pickup. Three different MORONS rear ended it while I was sitting totally stopped at red lights. The last time totalled it !!! It doesn't matter what color vehicle you drive, there will always be some brain dead jerk with his/her head buried so far up their ass that they will run over it no matter what you own !! I'm almost ready to buy & restore a '68 MACK truck and weld rail road iron all the way around it.
      jgadj
      • 7 Years Ago
      Also alot of fleet vehicles tend to be white. People will drive work vehicles more safely on average than their own. White vehicles tend to also be lower end vehicles. thus not as many on the roads.
        jgadj
        • 7 Years Ago
        @jgadj
        Well not around here. Im sorry you live in the Ghetto.
        • 7 Years Ago
        @jgadj
        "White vehicles tend to also be lower end vehicles. thus not as many on the roads."

        Have you considered leaving the house and actually go out and look. Where on earth did you get this conception?
      LHAYES1974
      • 7 Years Ago
      OF COURSE WHITE CARS ARE SAFER.
      DUH?
      YOU CAN SEE THEM BETTER.
      ;)
      Robert
      • 7 Years Ago
      Rosie is a BIG FAT PIG!
      StillPooh
      • 7 Years Ago
      As my statistics professor used to say "figures don't lie, but liars can figure". If white cars are less popular, then fewer people drive them. Therefore, OF COURSE you are less likely to die in a crash in a white car. The math is spurious.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I take it this study was done somewhere without snow?

      I wouldn't get a white car as when I had a white rental car in winter 3 people almost drove into me, since they couldn't tell my white car from a snow bank.

      -Brian
      Fredericton, NB, Canada
      Allen
      • 7 Years Ago
      I drive a white Chrysler Concorde, which replaced a red Intrepid that ended up totaled in a wreck, (not my fault) the red Intrepid was virtually the same car as my current Concorde and I have personally noticed that both statistics regarding red cars attracting more attention (for potential tickets and accidents) and white cars being safer are in fact quite true, my driving has not changed, but I have noticed that the way other drivers see me has.
      Red seems to equal race or wreck to some, too many bulls on the road I guess.
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