• Jun 28, 2007
During a recent Bimmer-hunting expedition at the Nurburgring, ace photog Hans Lehmann was able to procure a shot of the engine bay of a development mule for the 2010 BMW 7-series. When inspecting the layout, he noticed two intercoolers, and the best guess now is that the V8 fitted to the new 7-series could be the same engine employed in the new M3. With over 400 horsepower on tap in naturally-aspirated guise, it's not a stretch to think that this blown motor could produce upwards of 500 HP with limited tweaking. M7 anyone?
When the new 7-series goes on sale in late 2009, those suspicions will be confirmed.

[Source: Straighline]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 3 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      Hmm, maybe BMW has used the information and success from the 335 motor and applied it to some new motors. Seems like a good idea given how smooth, torquey and turbo-lag free that motor is.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Anybody see a throttle body? Hmm... Personally, I think it would make sense that it was a diesel in there.
      • 7 Years Ago
      It all depends on the air snorkels. (need different angles)

      an easy layout: air from the snorkels crosses to the opposite side air filter, then goes to its turbo, then the air runs forward-comes up through the intercooler, then into the engine.

      more german: air runs straight back to the filter (post filter metering) comes out of the filter, cross to the other side of the engine (not shown) into turbo, out of turbo, to the intercooler, into engine.