• Jun 14, 2007
An article published in yesterday's Globe and Mail newspaper focused on the ongoing discussion/debate our neighbors to the north are having with regard to greenhouse gas emissions and the role fuel plays in them. Automakers quoted in the article are essentially unanimous in their opinions that Canada needs to improve the quality and variety of the fuels it has on the market. Cleaner detergent gasolines, low-sulfur diesel, and E85 Ethanol are all touched upon in the piece by Greg Keenan.

One of the more interesting revelations comes near the top of the article. BMW, which will add diesels to its Canadian product range next year, is apparently considering whether or not to export the very economical MINI Cooper D to the Great White North. As we've mentioned before, the latest version of the Cooper D is good for 60 mpg. A note to BMW: Instead of just Canada, you should think of maybe sending the Cooper D to ALL of North America. You might find that the market's plenty receptive in that other country. You know... the one with 50 states.

[Source: The Globe and Mail]


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  • 9 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      Diesels are for waste oil burning commies. More Bentley Brooklands!
      • 7 Years Ago
      If the damn things just weren't so damn metrosexual... but I suppose if I could consider a Volksauto or Scuba-roo, this ought be on the list, too. Handles good and gets good milage...
      • 7 Years Ago
      I'd make my 2008 order TODAY for the D.[here in the US of Afraid of Diesels]
      • 7 Years Ago
      That's right. Just ignore the States. Nothing to see here. Move along.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Dunno. I've got an 07 cooper S and I get 30 MPG around town flogging it and 35-36 mpg on the freeway cruising at 80. That's economical, the car's nicely balanced and has more power than a 2600 lbs car needs.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Kudos to BMW for bringing the Mini D here and for staying away from the current Hybrid hype.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I think that Canada will be a much more receptive market to diesel technology. Volkwagen cant keep TDI models in stock and in western canada a good 80% of the Jetta's and Golf's I see are diesel, there are even a few V10 TDI Toureg's kickin around. Im just dieing to get my hands on a diesel Mini or 3-series. I have driven enough of them in europe to know they are somthing incredible.

      So in the end, even though its a small market, why not bring them to Canada where they are actually wanted and leave those bloody americans with their 17L V8's with fried chicken injection...
      • 7 Years Ago
      Here we go again with the Diesels. Not every damn car on the planet needs to be a diesel. Some folks who post here, have the ecological wisdom L'iL George, and think diesels are the greatest thing since sex.

      Thank goodness for the stricter than Europe emissions standards in certain states and larger urban areas, these things aren't getting shoved down our throats faster than we can swallow them.

      I am not against diesels, I am just against so damn many of them. I hope certain municipalities tax these things to death.

      Yes we need more fuel efficient cars, but diesel? Ahhh!! but now we have the low-sulphur diesel. Call me when it becomes no sulphur.

      So what, now it takes 10 diesel cars to do the same damage as 1 did in the past, With the rapid increased population of the globe, we will soon have 20 times the number of cars as we did 20 years ago.
        • 7 Years Ago
        "Here we go again with the Diesels. Not every damn car on the planet needs to be a diesel."

        True. But it would be oh-so-nice to have options beyond the Mercedes E320 CDI. Outside of medium and heavy-duty pickups, Americans have virtually no diesel option to choose from, and haven't for a long time.

        "Some folks who post here, have the ecological wisdom L'iL George, and think diesels are the greatest thing since sex."

        Oh, please. This country uses too much petroleum as it is. If diesel can help reduce that, I say bring it over. AS far as ecological concerns, diesels emit less CO2 and the new filter technologies are pretty damn good. Honda's got one on the way that'll put out the same level of pollutants as a gas engine.

        You want to make an ecological difference? How about pushing your local representatives to put newer emissions controls on city vehicles - buses, garbage trucks, etc that run on diesel. Likewise, offer incentives for business operators to adopt them.

        "Thank goodness for the stricter than Europe emissions standards in certain states...these things aren't getting shoved down our throats faster than we can swallow them."

        Actually, the wait's been for the transition to ULSD. Now that it's hear, automakers can bring newer emissions technologies to bear and actually pass those standards.

        "I am not against diesels..."

        Really? Could have fooled me.

        "I am just against so damn many of them. I hope certain municipalities tax these things to death."

        Outside of pickups, there are currently six diesel models available to carbuyers. SIX. Not twenty, not forty, SIX. Personally, I'd like to see some more selection, because I'm not about to buy either a Jeep or Mercedes, and VW's V-10 Touareg TDI is ridiculous.

        Instead of taxing diesels to death, how about a carbon tax?

        "Yes we need more fuel efficient cars, but diesel? Ahhh!! but now we have the low-sulphur diesel. Call me when it becomes no sulphur."

        Ultra-low sulphur diesel contains 15 parts per million sulphur. The EPA regulates that gasoline contain an average of 30 ppm, with a maximum cap of 80 ppm.

        "So what, now it takes 10 diesel cars to do the same damage as 1 did in the past, With the rapid increased population of the globe, we will soon have 20 times the number of cars as we did 20 years ago."

        I think you're overstating the potential growth in the diesel market. Between April '06 and March '07 (again, excluding pickups) light vehicle diesel sales totalled a whopping 36,000 units. Out of the 17 million or so sold every year. That's 0.002%. Assuming diesels strike a nerve in the U.S. and sales take off, even if they grow tenfold, we're still talking about 360,000 or so vehicles.

        Like it or not, good old gasoline is going to be the dominant fuel in this country for the foreseeable future. Or at least until the nuclear holocaust and global wars for resources that will ultimately hearken a new age of peace and prosperity for the remaining half a billion people on the planet.