• Jun 13, 2007
Plans to unearth a 1957 Plymouth Belvedere as part of a 50-year time capsule project in Tulsa may be all wet. Tulsarama crews had cracked open the vault to get ready for Friday's unveiling, but what they found was several feet of water surrounding the car. Witnesses said the water looked like chocolate milk and a hazmat team had to be called in to pump it out, just in case it turned out to be toxic. They are still expecting the best for the car because it was greased and wrapped in several layers of plastic and canvas. We're not sure that will be enough to safeguard the Plymouth from years of continual flooding, but we'll keep our fingers crossed for the Tulsarama organizers and partygoers. KOTV provided pics and video of the discovery. Click here for the news report or here for video of the soggy discovery ahead of this Friday's official reveal.

[Sources: Hemmings, KOTV]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 46 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      So does anyone know what color it is?

      And I'm not talking about the rust.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Snazzum,

      cars enclose air that gives them enough uplift to float. When water enters the car it displaces the air inside and destroys the uplift - tha car sinks.
      But when no water can enter the car (like if it is sealed in a plastic bag!) it should stay afloat.

      • 7 Years Ago
      "10 gallons of gasoline and motor oil cans that had been placed in the time capsule in case internal combustion engines became obsolete by 2007"

      And we all have robot maids and fly around in jetpacks.

      • 7 Years Ago
      Maurie Nord Says:

      June 24th, 2007 at 6:34 pm
      Last nite I found the guy who won the car. Here he is at eight years old:

      1930 United States Federal Census
      about Raymond E Humbertson
      Name: Raymond E Humbertson
      Home in 1930: Cumberland, Allegany, Maryland
      Age: 8
      Estimated birth year: abt 1922
      Relation to Head of House: Son
      Father’s name: Azariah
      Mother’s name: Mary E
      Occupation:

      Education:

      Military Service:

      Rent/home value:

      Age at first marriage:

      Parents’ birthplace: View image
      Neighbors: View others on page
      Household Members: Name Age
      Azariah Humbertson 42
      Mary E Humbertson 40
      Albert O Humbertson 20
      Azariah H Humbertson 18
      J Catherine Humbertson 16
      Charles E Humbertson 11
      Raymond E Humbertson 8
      Levada P Humbertson 6

      He died in 1979, in Virginia:

      Raymond Humbertson
      Born: 8 Jul 1921
      [city], [county], Maryland, USA
      Died: 1 May 1979
      [city], [county], Virginia, USA

      He was married without kids, a Korean War veteran, but apparently he has a nephew who may inherti the car

      Cheers,

      Maurie Nord, Pusan, South Korea

      www.maurienord.ocm

      • 7 Years Ago
      Look at these pics of what it looked like "back in the day"

      http://www.misterw.com/Plymouth/57PlyBel06.html
        • 7 Years Ago
        Even the gas tank door has style.

        Today's cars just aren't works of art anymore. Old cars were works of art inside AND out. Compared to the cars of Yesteryear, even Cadillacs and the Chrysler 300 are bland.

        Ah, the good ol' days.
        • 7 Years Ago
        They were great lookers, weren't they? I had a Savoy of the same year.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Plastic or not, with all that moisture for a long time the car will be a rot box. Too bad. I hope that the party responsible for donating the car is not too sad to see the car now.
      used tolive inok
      • 7 Years Ago
      SO THEY TAUGHT US..YOU WISH IT WAS 1957 SO YOU COULD BUY GAS FOR 25 CENTS, BECAUSE GAS TODAY IS MORE EXPENSIVE THAN GALLON OF MILK?, SARAN WRAP LASTS FOREVER AND THAT IS WHY TODAYS CARS ARE MADE OF PLASTIC?, IF YOU DIG A BIG HOLE YOU GET WATER FREE(A WELL)AND WONT HAVE TO USE A BUCKET TO GET IT OUT OF THE HOLE IN 2007?, THAT THE MONEY IS WORTH THE SAME TODAY IF NOT LESS?(COST OF LIVING TODAY), ENAMEL PAINT AND TRIPLE PLATE CHROME ARE THE WAY TO GO?, BIAS PLY TIRES LAST LONGER?, HEARD ELVIS WAS THERE OR IN THERE? WHAT? ONLY IN OK...OK? IF HER LIGHTS COME ON BY THEMSELVES TONIGHT THEN OK WILL HAVE A STAR!!!!!!!!! SOMEONE SAID THEY CALLED HER CHRISTINE? OH, CALL THE ENGINEERS, IT GOES TO SHOW THAT FORD BEAT TUCKER AND PLYMOUTH TOO? HMMMMMMMMM..........
      • 7 Years Ago
      It won't much matter what that 1957 Plymouth was wrapped in because chronic rust was standard equipment on all Chrysler products back then.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I am going down to Tulsa from KC on Friday and Saturday to visit the car show (out of some weird curiosity about this car primarily). I really don't care what condition it is in because being totally ruined is just as interesting to me as it being in good shape.

      Oh yeah, I think that "Amber" just punked us with the "no plastic" comments.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Only in Tulsa.... publicity stunt 50yrs in the making, and they jump the gun by a couple days. Supposedly the local hotels here are all booked up with people wanting to see how it looks when uncovered.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Belvedere!
      I love it. Im 58 years old and I fondly remember the days when cars had names and a soul. Now all I hear is TSX and CTS and DTS and CLK. What happened to the days of naming a car something glorious and meanigful?

      My brother bought a Zephyr last year. Went to have it serviced he found out it is called MKZ. The guy said its pronounced Mark Z. Then went for service just last month and found out its now just called MKZ. Letters spelled out. Its stupid. What the hell was wrong with Zephyr?
      • 7 Years Ago
      There are lots of different types of plastic depending on how the molecules of polymer are arranged. A plastic sheet like we know today did not exist back then. There were no plastic bags. If you went to a grocery store they would give you paper bags. And on and on.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plastic
        • 7 Years Ago
        In 1933, Ralph Wiley, a Dow Chemical lab worker, accidentally discovered polyvinylidene chloride or Saran. Ralph, a college student who cleaned glassware in a Dow Chemical lab, came across a vial he couldn't scrub clean. He called the substance "eonite", after an indestructible material in the comic strip "Little Orphan Annie." Dow researchers made Ralph's "eonite" into a greasy, dark green film, which Dow called "Saran". The military sprayed it on fighter planes to guard against salty sea spray and carmakers used it for upholstery. Dow later got rid the of Saran's green color and unpleasant odor.

        After World War 2, it was approved for food packaging, and it was Prior Sanctioned in 1956 (Society of the Plastics Industry). PVDC is cleared for use as a food contact surface as a base polymer, in food package gaskets, in direct contact with dry foods, and for paperboard coating in contact with fatty and aqueous foods.

        Saran resins for food contact can be extruded, coextruded or coated by a processor to meet specific packaging needs. About 85 percent of PVDC is used as a thin layer between cellophane, paper and plastic packaging to improve barrier performance. For non-food contact, Saran resins can be used for molding and melt adhesive bonding. In combination with polyolefins, polystyrene and other polymers, Saran can be coextruded into multilayer sheets, films and tubes.

        Saran films are best known in the form of Saran Wrap ® film, the first cling wrap designed for household (1953) and commercial use (1949), introduced by the Dow Chemical Company. Saran Wrap ® brand plastic film is now marketed by S. C. Johnson.
        • 7 Years Ago
        My family had a new 1957 Plymouth station wagon. The styling was considered beautiful. I drove it a lot, and took it on trips. Right after buying it, my mother had clear plastic seat covers installed. Sheets of plastic, tailored and sewed to fit the seats. Everybody did that, especially with station wagons.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Gregg a plastic sheet that could cover a car was not around in 1957. People used canvas sheets or cloth sheets or some other material. Tarps were not made of plastic back then. Plastic was around, petroleum based plastic sheets were not. Thats all.

        Here is a timeline in the development of plastics:
        http://inventors.about.com/od/pstartinventions/a/plastics.htm
        • 7 Years Ago
        Look, Amber, apparently you weren't around in 1957, but I was and I can assure you that various forms of plastic had already been around by then for a long time. No, we didn't use plastic shopping bags then. But plastic to wrap that car was easily obtainable, and not some new exotic thing.
    • Load More Comments