• Jun 4, 2007
It is well known by now that decisions made around convertibles don't follow rational rules. That's why Britain, a place with some of the least agreeable weather in the world, has made some of the most appealing convertibles ever seen, though perhaps not the most reliable. Convertible resale values are also not constrained by conventional wisdom: a study by EurotaxGlass found that in the UK, some mass-market ragtops hold their value much better than their more prestigious brethren.

Over a twelve month period in the UK, judged by trade value as a percentage of list price, a Ferrari F430 Spider maintains 97. They are the only two examples that manage to lose less than 10.

EurotaxGlass also reveals that while there are peaks and troughs in convertible values based on the time of year, hardtop convertibles are not so affected by them, which makes sense. But they also say dealers have reported buyers not wanting folding hardtops because then other people wouldn't know they were driving a convertible. According to EurotaxGlass, "It seems discreet coupe-convertible styling does not flatter the vanity of some owners." Click the link to get the entire list of residual values.

[Source: Gizmag]



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      Interesting that in the UK the F430 retains 97% of its value after one year, but in the USA they are difficult to find for less than 20-40% above the MSRP that they sold for new.
      • 7 Years Ago
      This is what I'm waiting for- 4 seat convertible deisel- that's this soccer mom's dream! :)

      Hubby has a Jetta TDI wagon and there is no deisel smell. Smaller engine than the smoke blowing deisels we're used to? Perhaps, but whatever it is, I am ready for my EOS TDI.
      • 7 Years Ago
      i'm moving back to europe soon (from the US), and as a result, can take one car back with me tax free. i want to buy a new car here and sell it in europe and hope to make a hefty profit, given that prices are higher in europe than in the US, and the weak dollar/strong euro will help. Any ideas on what car i should take? I can reasonably spend up to $70,000
      • 7 Years Ago
      The Eos do exist. My wife said her sister in-law bought one. This is in Atlanta, but that convertible hardtop isn't a diesel. I am pretty sure that the diesel Eos isn't going to be an easy find around the USA.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Actually GhostDoggy it'll be impossible, not hard. VW hasn't imported any TDIs since the whole MKV change over due to the readying of new engines to meet emissions standards.

      I'd love to buy one of these, I've already got two TDIs and neither have offered a diesel smell with all windows and roofs down so I'm not quite sure which current tdi JC3's quip is based on... or if it's pure speculation.
      • 7 Years Ago
      A diesle convertible? Just drop the top if you want a better woof of that nasty diesle smell.Ranks right up there with musty old sneakers in my book.
      • 7 Years Ago
      SEE! I keep saying I want a drop-top Diesel, and everyone thinks I'm nuts. I'm not... merely ahead of the curve here in America.

      Somebody build me a 2-seat TDI roadster!

      --chuck

        HotRodzNKustoms
        • 7 Years Ago
        I was very sad when VW said they weren't going to build that little 70mpg 2 seater roadster... the Eco-racer I think it was. The next best thing, I guess, is to import a Smart Roadster to the US.
      • 7 Years Ago
      of course, i want to know what cars hold their value well, even as a used model (why i posted in this thread...)
        • 7 Years Ago
        Testa,

        Corvette or '60s American muscle car. No point in buying a Federalized VW, BMW or MB when they're heavier and de-tuned.