• May 29, 2007

Remove Car Dent With Airduster - More amazing video clips are a click away

We'd like to be able to explain exactly how this home brew process for removing car dents works, but Physics 101 didn't agree with us in college. The process is simple and involves heating the dent with a hairdryer for 30 seconds to a minute. Next, quickly spray the area with compressed air for about 10 seconds. The last step is to take a step back and listen for the dent to pop itself out. Surely the explanation involves the expansion and contraction of metal due to the hairdryer's heat and the -110 degree Farenheit temperature of the liquid CO2 from the compressed air. The video's producer is quick to point out that his process will not harm your vehicle's paint, though we imagine whatever dented your car in the first place already did.

Thanks for the tip, Dave!

[Source: Metacafe]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 51 Comments
      Susan
      • 7 Years Ago
      Wow, maybe you should give up auto body work and take a night course on spelling and grammar.
      • 7 Years Ago
      nice technique! thank you for the tip!
      scott
      • 7 Years Ago
      This does NOT WORK, I just spent $13 on the compressed air, and when turned upside down, it does appear to ice up as in the video and then it melts like in the video, I have a small softball sized minor dent in my tercel, and nothing it just sat there, sounded like a good concept but, again, this does not work, same as the tennis ball with the door lock scam, again, this does NOT WORK. Save your money.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Now that we have mastered removing dents, lets move on to perfecting our grammar! lol. Just kidding. Nice tip!
      • 7 Years Ago
      I have seen the same with heat & dry ice. I don't have dry ice but have the other two ingredients. I'm giving it a whirl. I imagine it is best for a more recent dent but will try, never the less.
      salflyer
      • 7 Years Ago
      I have a friend who has made big bucks for the past four years running a business which removes dents from auto's at new and used car dealerships using a similar process. Seeing this is disturbing to me and certainly will piss him off.
      • 7 Years Ago
      whether or not this process works, I have to say that vid looks pretty fake.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Did a second grader do the captions?
      • 7 Years Ago
      I had 4 small ( ping pong ball) sized dings on my ford focus, I tried this and so help me it worked! Auto shop down the street quoted me $550.00 for it on last wednesday! (I HATE AUTO SHOPS!) I did the whole procedure in 10 minutes!! Thanks Jap dude!!
      • 7 Years Ago
      I tried this with dry ice and a blow dryer on several dents. I have found this proceedure to not work at all. Search for dry ice to remove dents..there are a lot of pages on the internet about it.
      • 7 Years Ago
      oh and canned air dusters are not liquid CO2.

      It is something like Freon
        • 7 Years Ago
        "It is something like Freon"

        Freon has been a banned substance for over a decade.
          • 7 Years Ago
          "Canned air uses Tetrafluoroethane"

          Thanks! You think I could find it written on a can. Nothing
          • 7 Years Ago
          Canned air uses Tetrafluoroethane or similar, which is a substance LIKE Freon.
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canned_air
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrafluoroethane
          • 7 Years Ago
          FREON IS BRAND NAME FOR R-22 BY DUPONT AND IS STILL IN SERVICE
          • 7 Years Ago
          Freon is a trade name by Dupont for their CFC, HCFC, and some of their other older refrigerants. Most notable are R-12, R-22 and R-502. CFC production has been discontinued in the US due to ozone issues but these substances are not banned. Use is still permitted by licenced tech's such as myself and is restricted to closed systems. It is unlawful in many (but not all) nations, including the US, to vent these substances into the atmosphere, you will not find "Freon" as a propellant in any product offered in the US.
        Susan
        • 7 Years Ago
        it is 1,1-difluoroethane and this procell works, as soon as I saw the video, I tried it to the small dents from hail on the hood of my Miata. I'm convinced.
        jim
        • 7 Years Ago
        you ned to know what you are talking about before you open your mouth freon is still very much in use today and will be for your life time
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