• May 29, 2007

Out of a run of 30,000 5.7-liter V8 engines, Toyota has had reports of 20 camshafts snapping -- a minuscule number in light of the total (0.06 percent, as a matter of fact). Toyota says the outside supplier of the camshafts has discovered the problem, which was "a metallurgical defect in the casting," and the company is trying to figure out how many of the remaining 30,000 engines could also be affected, though because of the company's production method, the final number is not expected to be large. The camshafts have been designed to prevent collateral damage in case they break, but Toyota will replace a customer's entire engine if the camshaft failure should occur by sending a new 5.7L via airfreight to the nearest daeler. Apparently some Toyota execs believe that the new number one global automaker has been growing too fast to maintain proper quality control. Yet with the Tundra being a new truck with a new engine in a new market for Toyota, there are going to be teething problems, as we've seen. What remains to be seen is if, or for how long, these problems will continue.

Thanks for the tip, Tracy!

[Source: Pickuptruck.com]



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  • 76 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      let the excuses begin.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I've never heard of a breaking camshaft. Metallurgical defects should not determine wether or not the camshaft(s) snaps. It should be made of thick enough material where it shouldn't matter. IMHO Toyota sucks, will always suck, and there is no changing it. Screw those DOHC torqueless junk trunks. Long live series III 3800
        • 7 Years Ago
        About toyota being crap? NO. About broken cams? Yes.
        • 7 Years Ago
        You're kidding right? What makes you think that a camshaft with a metallurgic structural problem wouldn't break? The part is rotating and under axial load.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I `ve had problems with every make of vehicle I`ve owned. All this shows is Toyota is no better or do they take care of the customer any better than the other makes. About time for the field of perception to be leveled a bit. There is no good or evil that defines any peticular company. Drivers of other makes don`t constantly have to justify why they choose their brand. I would like to see fairness to the others who also build great cars in most cases better cars than Toyota. A spade is a spade.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Hopefully, Geely won't duplicate the Tundra's casting fault when "developing" their new, 5.7L V8-powered full-size truck.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Nobody is making excuses for Toyota. OBJECTIVELY, Toyota makes the best cars out there. Notice that this is a statement is based on facts presented in various surveys and studies (j.d. power, wards, etc).
      Remember, its easy for a V6, AWD, leather covered Ford Fusion to beat a base I4 Camry and Accord in a comparison test. I guess American car companys haven't forgotten that we are stupid.
      BTW, Iacocca, in his interview with Charlie Rose, basically said that American cars were great and the problem was that DEALERS weren't slinging their shit fast enough. When I used to sit in on sales meetings for a former employer, I used to get the same criticism. They used to tell me its not what people want or need, its how much you can sell to them.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Horse hockey. No survey is objective. All organizations have their agendas. Any car company which claims to be the best but which has had more recalls in the last 18 months than any other major car company on the planet is very suspect.
          • 7 Years Ago
          They may have had the most recalls, but who sells more and who owns up to responsibility when there is a problem.... TOYOTA..... thats why they are moving forward!
      • 7 Years Ago
      Really, the issue that I think most are feeling is this: Ford has a "flame-thrower" and the media jumps over it, crucifies Ford for poor quality, reminds everyone that they are losing billions during their restructuring, and making it sound like your going to be fried like a chicken while the truck is idling in your work yard.

      Toyota's problem is 20 broken shafts in their 5.7. So what. Everyone does have teething problems, and Toyota is certainly having their fare share, but the point is that media who crucified Ford for the flame-throwing will probably not run this story. Why? Because it's not as sensational. I suppose that if someone's cam blew while on the highway dragging 5,000 pounds and it resulted in a death, I could imagine some publicity, but I would say that's unlikely. Other than that, Toyota having quality problems is a negative non-issue story while Ford having quality problems is a negative hot-issue story - the best kind for sales of papers.

      What I think most American auto fans want is something to feel good about - ie; Toyota not being the golden child just once. Just once showing that Toyota is no longer the king of quality (which in my opinion and experience, it is not - maybe Honda). But unless something really major happens, they won't taste that victory.

      It's actually starting to sound like the early 80s when drivers of Toyota and Honda were trying to point out ANY flaw in American vehicles to feel more secure about their vehicles (although, it was a bit easier, but Japanese cars weren't as high-quality then either). Public opinion had decided that the little Corolla was a just a rusting pile of crap, when in actuality it was a good, reliable car. Now, everyone thinks that Ford is Fix or Repair Daily while the Fusion is outranking the Camry and Accord in quality studies. We'll see where we are in 20 more years.

      In the meantime, the reality check is that problems occur. Sucks, but it happens to EVERYONE (remember that next time GM posts a recall - which they haven't been doing a lot lately) and currently the Tundra has not proven itself a more reliable vehicle than a GM or Ford product or even more capable. It may in the future, but it's not there yet. That gives the Big 2 and whatever Chrysler is now some breathing room to get their new offerings updated and improved and gives Toyota some valuable experience playing in the full-size truck market.
      • 7 Years Ago
      oh please. ITS THE ENGINE. its not the plastic doohickey on the radio. I'm reminded of Ron White's Lug Nut Story. They have a manufacturer that provides them one item, and they cant get that right????

      People get all over Ford because an Explorer rolls over when an idiot tries to drive it like a mustang. But hey, Toyota is having teething problems because they have a new engine. Have they never dealt with an engine before? MAybe not, maybe that is how they get great gas mileage...

      Seriously, you cant expect them to be perfect but you shouldnt soft pedal it because its one of the supposed great ones...
      • 7 Years Ago
      The Tundra came out well before the Titan.
      • 7 Years Ago
      George, once again with the Ford challenge thing.

      First off, the V6 Fusion was compared against the V6 Camry and the V6 Honda.

      Secondly, what was you problem with the comparison? It was a top of the line Fusion and top of the line Camry and Accords. You are trying to fault Ford for offering AWD when the Camry and Accord only come FWD (at the same price as a AWD Fusion mind you). You sound like someone complaining about losing a basketball game because the other guy was taller.
      • 7 Years Ago
      SRM

      Take it from a metallurgist: DEFECTS IN THE CASTING PROCESS CAN LEAD TO CATASTRPHIC FAILURE!
      What is the defect? my guess is there was a hot spot or cold spot in the casting molds... that would lead to excessive porosity and or voids (read: no metal where there should be metal!)

      How these parts passed muster in the qualification stages of post production before they were delivered to ToyMoCo is something you can bet your ass toyota execs are investigating though. These parts should've been scrapped before they were delivered.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Finally an educated ,well informed post.
      • 7 Years Ago
      This confirms Toyota quality is slipping badly.

      Nonetheless one has to respect it for jumping right on the problem, and exceeding customer expectations by replacing the entire engine. I doubt the domestic manufacturers would do either.
        • 7 Years Ago
        Nonetheless one has to respect it for jumping right on the problem, and exceeding customer expectations by replacing the entire engine. I doubt the domestic manufacturers would do either.

        If ya wanna sell a new product or a new brand and, if you want its introduction to be successful this is how it's done. And if ya wanna keep the customers coming back---Look at what this domestic automaker did in the early 1990s.

        http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3165/is_n6_v27/ai_10903675

        FingerSled
      • 7 Years Ago
      I have found out how Toyota treats their customers first hand - I bought a new 2007 FJ Cruiser back in February. I took it back to the dealer 3 times due to leaking and out of round tires, they would check the air and say it was fixed. I went out and bought 5 new Michelin tires, and it fixed everything. I got a recall letter two weeks later for the tires, said to send in my receipt and they would pay me back. They never have, and last week a got a letter from Toyota saying that I have voided the entire warranty by putting tires on the truck. I traded it off, good riddance. The thing only got 8mpg in town, and only uses premium. I bought a Honda Ridgeline. 22mpg on regular, pulls the boat just fine. The only way to buy American now is to buy Honda, Toyota, or Hunday(sp). All of the Fords, Chevy, or Dodges I looked at were made in Canada or Mexico or Brazil. Is this American?
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