• May 7, 2007

Say what you will of the late John DeLorean, but when push came to shove, he never tired of searching for creative ways to promote his business interests.

One of the last initiatives he undertook was a time machine of sorts. Not quite like the one that immortalized his creation -- the stainless-steel, gull-winged DMC12 in the Back to the Future trilogy -- DeLorean Time was an initiative to sell a unique wristwatch. While you could certainly argue that any merchandising initiative – be it a timepiece or anything else – is simply another way for an automaker to raise income through alternative means, DeLorean was a little more direct about it. With the purchase of the DeLorean watch, the buyer would be entered into an unofficial contract to get first crack at the DMC2, the ill-fated sportscar which DeLorean had hoped to build before passing in 2005. By selling enough watches, DeLorean hoped, he could raise enough money to get the DMC2 into production.

Follow the jump to view a video of John DeLorean promoting the watch, or follow the link to view more photos.

[Source: Watchismo]



The watch was to be manufactured by Seiko's Tech Time subsidiary, and featured a hidden face. The quartz movement was perpetually powered by the wearer's own movement, eliminating the need to replace the battery. The case and bracelet were made of DeLorean's unique injected/molded stainless steel construction, like the original DMC12, and although it didn't have a flux capacitor like Doc Brown's, it did have at its heart a titanium lithium capacitor (that makes time tracking possible).

The asking price was $3,495 for the watch and the right of first refusal on a car that was never built, which is just as well because we have a feeling all the customer would get would be a bomb casing filled with used pinball-machine parts.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 4 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      That might be a little difficult since he's dead.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Such a sad story, and obviously a "car guy" who turned on his employer and paid an awful heavy price for it.
      • 7 Years Ago
      In one way or another: he's my man!
      • 7 Years Ago
      I never wanted one of his cars, but I'd love to have one of the watches. They're probably worth more.