• May 1, 2007
The standard, run of the mill 2008 Corvette LS3 carries 436 horsepower and hits 60 mph in just over 4 seconds. We were so excited about the upgraded Vette, we flew out to Bowling Green Kentucky on 24 hours notice just to get pictures of newest iteration of GM's affordable supercar. We feel the 2008 Corvette is worthy of travel within the continental United States, but for the much-rumored Z07, we'd fly to Mars.
We'd been hearing rumors about the vaunted Blue Devil Corvette for well over a year now, and when we saw that the 2008 Viper would have a domestic-best 600 HP, we knew an even more powerful Corvette was as inevitable as death and taxes. The folks over at Corvette Fever have published nine terrific shots of Chevy's most anticipated vehicle, and it's looking pretty darned close to being ready for production.

The Z07 is lower to the ground than even the Z06, and the tires and rims are larger, which kicks out the wheel wells by a few inches. There is also a huge chunk of plastic on the hood, which is probably helping to cool the beast's 7.0L, Supercharged V8. Blogger Bob pegged the horsepower of the blown V8 at between 600 and 700, which we gather would be good for 0-60 times faster than that of the Ford GT.

After 55 years of production we think the world is finally ready for a $100,000 Corvette, and we're looking forward to taking one for a spin.

[Source: Corvette Fever]

Thanks for the tip, Dave!


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  • 15 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      That there car will look so rad parked in front of my trailerr. Too bad I got no garage.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Z06 handling improved in its second year; count on Tadge and his crew to keep the new beast from being too twitchy.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Sweet mercy. Even Clarkson will like this one.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I was over at a corvette dealership and the guy there said that that vette in the pictures was indeed the test mule. He also said the red one that was spotted was on it's way to nurburgring. And he said that the look of the new corvette has NOT been decided yet. Not that they don't have designs but that it hasn't been designed yet.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Wow, they must be economizing by getting that hood scoop from JC Whitney & Co.

      I think they're running a two for one deal on 'em, and they throw in free fuzzy dice. GM couldn't resist.
      • 7 Years Ago
      If they get the handling under control on this car it will be a big hit. I have driven the Z06 and it is a fantastic car, but the handling is, at times very snaky and the wheels, if you wanted them to would spin forever. If they address the handling issue and make this a well rounded car it will be a winner, but if it is just more horsepower and bigger wheels this car could be even tougher to handle then the last one. Weight reduction, and moving the weight lower to the ground will definitely help the handling of this car. Maybe a spice up of the interior to and this would become a real winner.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Eliot
      ----------------------------------------------------
      I get your point, but really don't know where the weight rediction will come from.

      The LS motor by nature of design is superior to any DOHC V8 when it comes to lowering the mass. only horizontally (flat 6s and 4s) are better.

      The Transverse Leaf Spring also greatly contributes to lowering the center of gravity. See the advantages/disadvantages of this setup below.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corvette_leaf_springs

      Perception. Like pushrod engines, the leaf spring has a stigma that overshadows its advantages.

      GM has equipped the Corvette with two one-piece fiberglass composite leaf springs in place of coils. They run transversely across the width of the car, mounted in two places equidistant from the centerline. Each end is bolted to the bottom of an A-arm such that when the A-arm rises, the leaf pulls it down, again in proportion to a known spring rate. In this way, four coils are replaced with two leaf springs.

      Because both coils and leafs in these configurations act only as simple springs and are not required to stabilize the wheels, their function is almost identical.

      Advantages of transverse leaf springs
      Less unsprung weight. Coil springs contribute to unsprung weight; the less there is, the more quickly the wheel can respond at a given spring rate.
      Less weight. The C4 Corvette's composite front leaf weighed 1/3 as much as the pair of conventional coil springs it would replace.
      Weight is positioned lower. Coil springs and the associated chassis hard mounts raise the center of gravity of the car.
      Superior wear characteristics. The Corvette's composite leaf springs last longer than coils, though in a car as light as the Corvette, the difference is not especially significant. No composite Corvette leaf has ever been replaced due to fatigue failure, though steel leafs from 1963 to 1980 have been.
      As used on the Corvette, ride height can be adjusted by changing the length of the end links connecting the leaf to the suspension arms. This allows small changes in ride height with minimal effects on the spring rate.
      Also as used on the Corvette, the leaf spring acts as an anti-roll bar, allowing for smaller and lighter bars than if the car were equipped with coil springs.

      Disadvantages of transverse leaf springs
      Packaging can be problematic; the leaf must span from one side of the car to the other. This can limit applications where the drivetrain, or another part, is in the way.
      Materials expense. Steel coils are commodity items; a single composite leaf spring costs more than two of them.
      Design complexity. Composite monoleafs allow for considerable variety in shape, thickness, and materials. They are inherently more expensive to design, particularly in performance applications.
      Cost of modification. Due to the specialized design and packaging, changing spring rates would require a custom unit. Coil springs in various sizes and rates are available very inexpensively.
      Susceptibility to damage. Engine fluids and exhaust modifications like cat-back removal might weaken or destroy composite springs over time. The spring is more susceptible to heat related damage than conventional steel springs.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Eliot
      ----------------------------------------------------
      I get your point, but really don't know where the weight rediction will come from.

      The LS motor by nature of design is superior to any DOHC V8 when it comes to lowering the mass. only horizontally (flat 6s and 4s) are better.

      The Transverse Leaf Spring also greatly contributes to lowering the center of gravity. See the advantages/disadvantages of this setup below.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corvette_leaf_springs

      Perception. Like pushrod engines, the leaf spring has a stigma that overshadows its advantages.

      GM has equipped the Corvette with two one-piece fiberglass composite leaf springs in place of coils. They run transversely across the width of the car, mounted in two places equidistant from the centerline. Each end is bolted to the bottom of an A-arm such that when the A-arm rises, the leaf pulls it down, again in proportion to a known spring rate. In this way, four coils are replaced with two leaf springs.

      Because both coils and leafs in these configurations act only as simple springs and are not required to stabilize the wheels, their function is almost identical.

      Advantages of transverse leaf springs
      Less unsprung weight. Coil springs contribute to unsprung weight; the less there is, the more quickly the wheel can respond at a given spring rate.
      Less weight. The C4 Corvette's composite front leaf weighed 1/3 as much as the pair of conventional coil springs it would replace.
      Weight is positioned lower. Coil springs and the associated chassis hard mounts raise the center of gravity of the car.
      Superior wear characteristics. The Corvette's composite leaf springs last longer than coils, though in a car as light as the Corvette, the difference is not especially significant. No composite Corvette leaf has ever been replaced due to fatigue failure, though steel leafs from 1963 to 1980 have been.
      As used on the Corvette, ride height can be adjusted by changing the length of the end links connecting the leaf to the suspension arms. This allows small changes in ride height with minimal effects on the spring rate.
      Also as used on the Corvette, the leaf spring acts as an anti-roll bar, allowing for smaller and lighter bars than if the car were equipped with coil springs.

      Disadvantages of transverse leaf springs
      Packaging can be problematic; the leaf must span from one side of the car to the other. This can limit applications where the drivetrain, or another part, is in the way.
      Materials expense. Steel coils are commodity items; a single composite leaf spring costs more than two of them.
      Design complexity. Composite monoleafs allow for considerable variety in shape, thickness, and materials. They are inherently more expensive to design, particularly in performance applications.
      Cost of modification. Due to the specialized design and packaging, changing spring rates would require a custom unit. Coil springs in various sizes and rates are available very inexpensively.
      Susceptibility to damage. Engine fluids and exhaust modifications like cat-back removal might weaken or destroy composite springs over time. The spring is more susceptible to heat related damage than conventional steel springs.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I wouldn't worry; the name isn't even finalized, let alone the hood design. Stingray? SS? Blue Devil? Who knows; GM's gonna tease up to the final hour of unveiling.
      • 7 Years Ago
      That hood makes me think of a GNX. just a little too big. they'll probably have to make a carbon fiber hood that's higher so the SC scoop won't have to be so big
      • 7 Years Ago
      The z06's dampers have been tamed, the car is much better now.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Wa Wa wee Wa!!! High Five!!!!
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