• Apr 18, 2007
So you think even a Smart ForTwo is too much car for you? A Tesla Roadster has more performance than you need? You're afraid of falling off of a Segway? Then check out the single seater i-Swing from Toyota. It first appeared at the 2005 Tokyo Motor Show. With a maximum speed of 6mph nothing much too dangerous can happen to you unless the guy in jacked up Hummer doesn't see you, but in that case a real car wouldn't help much anyway.
The i-Swing can operate in either two or three wheel mode with a top speed of 12mph in the latter mode and 5mph when standing tall. At that pace you can cruise alongside someone walking while taking up little more space. The device is operated by a pair of joysticks on the end of each arm rest. Some more information from Toyota along with a video of the i-Swing in action can be found after the jump.



[Source: Toyota]

The i-swing
A new personal mobility vehicle that allows drivers to express their individuality
  • The single-person vehicle package boasts an individual design with a "wearable" feeling. Its low-resistance urethane body is covered in cloth to soften any impact while operating near people, and an LED illumination panel can be customized to display an image to suit your mood.
  • When traveling in a bustling street full of people, the i-swing can operate in a two-wheeled mode that takes up little space, so that it is possible to travel while keeping pace and talking with someone on foot.
  • When there is a need to move quickly, the i-swing can change to a three-wheeled mode, which is fun to travel in. In addition to the stick control, a pedal control can be used to provide a fresh cornering feeling, as you shift your body weight as if you were on skis.
  • The i-swing proposes the concept of using A.I. communication to enable it to grow, learning the habits and preferences of users by storing relevant data about them.


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