• Apr 10, 2007


With some minor disassembly performed in Part I in anticipation of a new cold air intake, we also performed a few modifications that will be explained further in some later posts. Now that the car and components are ready for installation, let's dive under the hood to finish up this project.



Since the scoop will poke through the air dam, we decided to remove the latter to simplify the task of opening a hole. A few spins of a nutrunner are all it takes to remove the handful of sheet metal screws holding the air dam in place.



A template is provided to establish a properly-sized opening.



With the outline of the hole drawn in paint marker, a sharp knife can be used to slice the soft plastic material. Watch your fingers, or else those precious digits will end up resembling those of the Autoblog Project Garage staff.



A few test-fits on the bench and a bit of trimming leave the opening just large enough for the mouth of the scoop to pass.



A pair of pilot holes are drilled for the sheet metal screws that will be used to attach the scoop to the filter canister, but the screws are not yet installed.



The canister is then lowered in from topside, snaked between the sway bar and the lower radiator core support, and hung from the bar with the supplied hardware.

Due to our non-stock front sway bar (it's actually the 32mm unit from a early '80s WS6 Trans Am), this part took the better part of an hour. Taking ten minutes to pull the fans probably would have brought the whole task down to fifteen minutes or so, but that's not really the way we work.



A clamp is then placed on the canister in anticipation of installing a filter.



The included S&B filter is pre-oiled, so all we have to do is pull off the wrapper.



The filter is clamped directly to the mass airflow sensor, then receives a rubber coupler.



The coupler affixes the filter/MAF assembly to the elbow, which is then attached to the throttle body via a flexible boot.



The filter assembly is dropped into the canister (those that live in particularly dirty areas may want to consider pulling some pantyhose over the filter before installation).



The boot and elbow are then secured to the throttle body.



As a final step, we have to secure the wiring and vacuum hoses. We start with the vent tube for the distributor...



... continue on to the intake air temperature sensor...



... and finally we plug in the MAF extension harness.



The last step is to re-install the air dam, and attach the scoop to the filter canister



The completed cold air intake assembly looks something like this from the underside...



... a bit like this from inside the engine compartment...



... and a lot like this from up top. Notice the way that camera flash really accentuates all the dead bugs that we failed to clean off before parking the car last fall.

Obviously, such a system is highly susceptible to water and debris ingestion, as well as being vulnerable to contact with curbs and other low obstructions. Drive accordingly, and if this any of this presents a problem, thinking about selecting a different system.

As for results, we've yet to roll the car onto the dyno, but a few quick blasts down the street with the data logging software showed a dramatic decrease in intake air temperatures. That can increase power in two ways - by increasing the density of the incoming charge, and by reducing the propensity for detonation and thereby allowing a bit more ignition advance. The first comes automatically, while the second may require a bit of PCM tuning to fully utilize.


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  • 14 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      This is an interesting way of installing an intake. For an amateur, like I am, it will work. But lets just make sure that a car mechanic will assist us. For sure, they know the ins and outs of the engine. As for the intake, I use use Vibrant cold air intake. I bought this stuff online. This is its complete website (http://www.coldairintakedirect.com/brands/vibrant.html)
      then I ask my friend Lee, a mechanic, to help me out. From there, the installation will be easy, as long as Lee is helping me out.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Looking at the rest of the engine bay, it doesn't appear that appearance matters much to the owner, it's dirty, wires everywhere, the non-painted parts have surface corrosion.

      The owner would have to spend hours upon hours and a fair amount of dollars to shine it up and make it show worthy, which is obviously not the intention here, so it appears as if functionality was the goal and hopefully it works out.

      I've fabricated a ton of stuff for my street/road race car that I spent way too much time, money, and headache to make look good. Sometimes, it's just not worth the hassle to mess with it. After all, who cares what the engine bay looks like if all they see is your tail lights at the track right?

      Just remember, it's an Impala SS, American muscle (maybe a bit more bloated than most muscle cars, but still). Not some bling bling Civic that has $5k worth of body kit, 20" wheels, coffee can exhaust, and neon but still only 100 HP.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I own a 2006 Dodge Charger SRT8 and installed the AIRAID Intake System http://www.airaidheadquarters.com part # 350-199 / 350-193 and I can’t say enough good things about this system. The installation instructions were second to none and very easy to understand. I first put together my new AIRAID system, and it took me about 10mins to assemble the whole kit, except for the filter, which I put on last. I then proceeded to take off my stock intake system, which consisted of removing the factory IAT sensor, 1 bolt and just a little bit of force to pull out the stock air box and this took me all of 5 minutes



      I then installed the new AIRAID Intake System, which has 3 bolts that it uses for mounting which is more secure than the stock system, then installed the new AIRAID Premium filter, reinstalled the IAT sensor and it was all ready to go. I then double checked my installation and was ready to turn her on and listen to the engine purr.



      When the car is at idle it’s not any louder than stock, but you can hear the big Airaid filter sucking in all that cool air.



      Test drive time. My first impression is WOW. The sound at wide open and part throttle are an enthusiasts dream, what a beautiful sound. On top of the awesome sound it makes, the performance is very noticeable over stock. The Charger pulls much harder in the mid to upper RPM range and really let’s this Hemi Breathe. It’s like a whole new car to drive with this Airaid Intake system and I love it. This system will also be a great compliment when I add other modifications such as a Cat-Back Exhaust, Headers, Cam shaft, or cylinder head upgrade.



      All I can say is that I am very impressed with the quality and design of the Airaid Intake for the Dodge Charger and would recommend it to anybody looking for more performance, or a more aggressive tone.

      • 7 Years Ago
      I can't believe you goons mangled the pipe that bad to mount the fogger nozzles. Very amateurish installation. Next time, spend the $20 it would cost to have a machine shop weld in some bungs.
      • 7 Years Ago
      "I've fabricated a ton of stuff for my street/road race car that I spent way too much time, money, and headache to make look good. Sometimes, it's just not worth the hassle to mess with it. After all, who cares what the engine bay looks like if all they see is your tail lights at the track right?"

      Well stated, Mike.

      And by the way - much of the exposed wiring is the result of some other projects that are currently taking place. I should have mentioned that, but I think I'm just getting used to seeing a rat's nest of wiring every time I walk out to the garage. It'll come together in future posts, though...
      • 7 Years Ago
      I've seen bungs put in backyard style where the flat spot on a round pipe was made by sanding down a thick nylon washer to match the radius of the pipe, kind of a curve-to-flat adapter. They spray painted em to match the pipe and then sealed em with silicon sealant. Looks factory but costs pennies.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I agree with poster #1. Also, putting the scoop that low is just inviting water to come into the engine. I hope you don't ever have to drive near a puddle or you'll be sorry you ever thought of putting the intake down there.
      • 7 Years Ago
      I disagree with #1. Bravo on the driveway, weekend, average guy installation method. We wanted a job us AutoBlog readers could do, not only a pro or man with deep pockets. You set out to create a how to for the average car guy and succeeded big time.

      BRAVO!
      • 7 Years Ago
      This is an interesting setup.
      I've done something similar in the past.

      The problem is where the pipes are situated.
      Between the radiator and the engine.

      The pipe it self heats up and you get some heat from that.

      You need to direct the pipes away from the heat or put heat shielding around them.

      I did some test with heat shielding.. it works miracles when done right
      • 7 Years Ago
      "A few minutes spend analyzing the situation would reveal that it was a much better idea to install the nozzles either on each side of the throttle body inlet."

      And a few minutes spent reading my response to the person that suggested that in the previous post would have revealed that this wouldn't be a great idea in a two-stage system, as it would potentially create a left-right imbalance in the fuel and nitrous flow. Stacking them as I did made perfect sense.

      "If you insisted on installing the nozzles facing vertically downward, a small tunular boss with a bung should have been fabbed up and welded into place instead."

      That's a damn good idea (although I would have appreciated a more polite way of conveying it).

      "Oh, and one more thing... Best of luck getting the braided line to clear the hood on the nozzle closest to the throttle body."

      Do you have any idea how much room is under the hood of my car? With the right-angle fittings shown in the last post, things will fit.

      It's interesting to note not just the number of comments on this particular project, but also the tone of them. A bit more tact would be appreciated, if anyone cares.
      • 7 Years Ago
      This has nothing to do with money. Even a backyard installer should have better sense than to smash the inlet pipe with a hammer to install the fogger nozzles. A few minutes spend analyzing the situation would reveal that it was a much better idea to install the nozzles either on each side of the throttle body inlet. If you insisted on installing the nozzles facing vertically downward, a small tunular boss with a bung should have been fabbed up and welded into place instead. As a seasoned weekend installer and nitrous user, I can attest that these are common principles which don't require any real money or special tools. ANY machine shop would have fixed you up for less than $20.

      Oh, and one more thing... Best of luck getting the braided line to clear the hood on the nozzle closest to the throttle body.
      • 7 Years Ago
      agreed with #1 plus you really think it'll flow that great with a 90 degree bend in the piping?? Chances are it'll flow worse and you'll lose power. By all means someone dyno before and after and prove me wrong
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