Back in 1994, the FIA banned the use of traction control systems on Formula One cars in an effort to put more emphasis on driver skill rather than technological prowess. By 2001, there was considerable hue and cry from some of the participants that certain teams were using advanced engine management software to work around the regulations, so the ban was lifted.

Next year, however, a standard ECU will be employed on all new F1 cars, allowing the FIA to keep a watchful eye on how each team uses their engine controls. Because of this standardization, a decision was reached yesterday that will totally eliminate the use of traction controls systems beginning during next year's season.

The exact text of the new rule can be viewed by following the "Read" link below, but the short and sweet is simple: the driver cannot be informed if a drive wheel is spinning. Period.

According to, the ban was not only supported by the FIA, but also by the majority of the participating teams. We're looking forward to seeing how this new regulation will affect the 2008 season, but considering the talent of most F1 drivers, we doubt they'll be any substantial shuffling at the top of the board.

[Source: via Axis of Oversteer]

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