• Mar 31st 2007 at 12:42PM
  • 7

Here is an idea that has taken hold in the computer realm, but not so much in the automotive world: open source. If you know anything about computers, you have probably heard of Linux, the open source operating system. What exactly does open source mean? It means that anybody who can write in the language of the software in question can make their own changes to it, and publish their changes as they see fit. We have seen, however, that just because something, like Linux, is open source, it is not necessarily free. As you are probably aware, it is pretty easy to pay for a copy of Linux which has been modified in a certain way so as to make it different than other versions of the software. How does this relate to cars? Glad you asked! Check this out, an open source car (there's also OScar). It is known as the "c,mm,n", which is pronounced "common". It is here on Autobloggreen because it is powered by hydrogen at this time. Don't like hydrogen as a fuel? Don't use it... this is common source, remember? Get the plans yourself and change it however you want. Interested in knowing more? I am, which is why I have requested information on the car. I'll see what it takes to get some knowledge about the car from their website and share with you what I find. Stay tuned!

[Source: c,mm,n via Engadget]



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 7 Comments
      • 8 Years Ago

      "Open Source" Car to be Huge on Digg

      commoncar.jpgThe c,mm,n (pronounced "common") is apparently the world's first open source car. It's a crazy-looking hydrogen-powered vehicle, but I guess since it's open source that means you can change it to run on anything you want, as the plans are included.

      I'll be honest, I can see an "open source" car being successful in terms of the onboard computer and the types of applications it can run, but are there really enough people who know how to work with engines to that degree to make this more than a pet project for serious green auto geeks? I guess we'll see, but in any case it's cool to see the open source movement getting outside and getting some fresh air for once. –Adam Frucci

      The open source car, known as the c,mm,n is powered by hydrogen [AutoblogGreen]

      "Open Source" Car to be Huge on Digg

      commoncar.jpgThe c,mm,n (pronounced "common") is apparently the world's first open source car. It's a crazy-looking hydrogen-powered vehicle, but I guess since it's open source that means you can change it to run on anything you want, as the plans are included.

      I'll be honest, I can see an "open source" car being successful in terms of the onboard computer and the types of applications it can run, but are there really enough people who know how to work with engines to that degree to make this more than a pet project for serious green auto geeks? I guess we'll see, but in any case it's cool to see the open source movement getting outside and getting some fresh air for once. –Adam Frucci

      The open source car, known as the c,mm,n is powered by hydrogen [AutoblogGreen]

      # 5:15 AM

      love the idea,this would work for many other projects in other areas,yeah.
      # 5:15 AM

      • 8 Years Ago
      There's an interesting article on the OSCar project here:
      http://www.authenticbusiness.co.uk/archive/oscarproject/
      It's a fascinating concept and one that has a bright future in my opinion. Just one of the ways in which niche car manufacturers are going to thrive in the coming years.
      • 8 Years Ago
      "Or go work on Red Hat Linux out of the blue."
      means
      "Or go work on Red Hat Linux out of the blue and have it be part of their distribution."
      • 8 Years Ago
      Good that you could opt out of using bulky expensive H2 fuel, but it still is an ugly design. Guess I'd opt out of the body design as well.

      How can an amature effort done in their spare time possibly compete against professionals hired to work full time on it? Would you really want to trust an amature designed safety system?

      It is "free" so it appeals to the miserly, but as the old saying goes "You get what you pay for".
      • 8 Years Ago
      Happy to tell you all that the website now has an English section! You’ll find the English pages in the blue bottom line. Come have a look and tell us what you think on the message board www.autoindetoekomst.nl/forum!
      • 8 Years Ago
      "It means that anybody who can write in the language of the software in question can make their own changes to it, and publish their changes as they see fit."

      It isn't quite that crazy. Each code base is controlled. Sure "anybody" as you say can get a *copy* of the codebase and make changes but then you'd have to trust them to use their distribution of the code. You aren't going to just go over to sourceforge.net and start working on a project for instance. Or go work on Red Hat Linux out of the blue.

      So with the car thing (I didn't read the article so) I am guessing professionals who like what they do (enough spend FREE time on it), will overlook the project and make sure "amateurs" don't add bad things to the project.

      Some software companies will pay their employees to work all or most of their time on an opensource project (the company may need it or want the kudos associated).

      Still, software is a different animal than an automobile. You can write software at home with very little if any (more than you already have) resources.

      Interesting idea though. And yes, my first thought was, "ugly".

      • 8 Years Ago
      Also, I meant to write, "It isn't quite as crazy as it may sound" (sorry Jeremy). I just saw the first comment about amateurs and safety and I just wanted to make the point that it isn't always/just amateurs on open source projects. And there can be checks and balances to the work.
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