• Feb 27, 2007
Back in the go-go '80s, classic Ferrari prices went through the roof. Especially valuable were the rarest models to have come from Maranello. Because of the ridiculous values, many "lesser" Ferraris gave their chassis to be remodeled as those ultra rare versions. One such target was the Ferrari 365 GTS/4, aka the Daytona Spyder. With less than 100 Spyders produced in US form, Daytona coupes sometimes found their way into body shops and miraculously emerged as ragtops. With the real deal Spyders trading for well over a million bucks each, it was a pretty common conversion. But buyers caught on and the market eventually slumped and the need to chop the top died down. The market settled and the fakes were identified. But there has been a resurgence and original, unmolested Spyders are once agin commanding seven figures when they appear on the market. It doesn't happen very often, so when it does, it's noteworthy.

Well, noted Iowa Ferrari collector Dr. Jack Frost died recently, and his 1971 Ferrari Daytona Spyder (365 GTS/4) popped up on eBay. The miraculous thing about this particular Daytona is that it is not only a real Spyder, but it has never been titled. That makes it a brand new 1971 Daytona Spyder that has just 3,700 orginal miles. Interested? It gets better. The car was originally ordered by Bill Harrah of Bill Harrah's Modern Classic Motors exotic dealership. Harrah custom ordered the car in the current color after seeing the original Daytona Coupe prototype in the same combination. It is white with a red side stripe and the interior features black Daytona seats with red inserts. Quite striking. No other Spyder is believed to have left the factory similarly painted. After having some fun with it, Harrah sold it to Dr. Jack Frost, MD of Action Performance in 1976. Frost never titled it either and added a few more miles before he passed away. Bidding on this first eBay go-around just ended and the $1,335,400 top bid failed to meet the reserve. Hard to say what this unique vehicle might eventually bring, but rumor has it that price was about 50% shy of the mark.

Thanks for the tip, Adam!

[Source: eBay]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 4 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      Don't forget the other reason high-end cars are often not titled by their owners-avoiding taxes.
      • 7 Years Ago
      You've got it. If you are dropping $1.5 large on a car, you can handle $200 per year or whatever for dealer pl8s.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Riddle me this Batman....unless you have dealer plates to throw on it how does one legally drive said Ferrari on public roads without having it titled, etc, etc in their state.
      • 7 Years Ago
      And if you're a big enough collector - you probably buy and sell enough cars to qualify for a dealer plate. I know a buddy of mine had a serious car fetish and would buy and/or sell a car at least once a month, sometimes more... nothing fancy, just fun daily drivers.. The DMV got tired of seeing his mug and forced him to get dealer plates.