• Feb 17, 2007
Let's set the scene here. You're a homeowner on a street with a chronic speeding problem. Short of "accidentally" dropping a box of roofing nails in the street, there's not much recourse. You could pester the local constabulary to park one of their radar trailers in your neighborhood to remind folks they're speeding; or better yet, station one of their servants there on a regular basis to write tickets. That won't be much help if one of the egregious speeders is part of the thin blue line that separates order from chaos.

A Georgia couple trying to keep speeds down for the safety of their son opted to set up their own speeding sting. Lee and Teresa Sipple mounted a radar unit and three video cameras outside their home in hopes of reminding neighbors to drive carefully. They managed to nab local officer Richard Perrone doing nearly 20 MPH over the limit. Possibly suffering from injured pride, a guilty conscience or a sense of self-righteous indignation, Perrone went whining to the local authorities when he was one-upped at his own game. The Sipples, in turn, received a visit from the police alerting them that Perrone intended to press charges for stalking and had filed a warrant application for their arrest. Whiner.

This is like a home invader suing you for shooting his larcenous ass. Where's the sense of accountability? Perrone got what he deserved for flouting the very statutes he's entrusted with enforcing. Before we get too indignant, Perrone has had a change of heart and withdrawn his complaint. We wonder if he's had a change of heart, or if more subtle harrassment tactics than arrest warrants will be more satisfying?

[Source: Daily Tribune News via Digg]


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  • 27 Comments
      • 7 Years Ago
      There used to be a state cop in town that ran lights, no turn signals, speed limits,etc... He cut me off more than once. Where was he going? Home, off shift.

      Our town has a local newspaper where you can bitch and not leave your name. Sometimes they would print your comments.

      I used to bitch, "The State Cop driving cruiser # XXXX was at it again @ 6:15 AM. Going like a bat out of hell, he was heading home to XXXXXX St."

      After awhile, there were other comments, like "So, I'm not the only who sees this clown?"

      He stopped doing his tricks in town after awhile. Maybe he flaunted the laws somewhere else, but not in town.


      GotThatVibe
      • 7 Years Ago
      Pressed charges for stalking? What?! Shouldn't cops at least know a LITTLE about the law? If a person causes you any sort of problem on only one occasion, it cannot possibly be considered stalking. Stalking requires more than one interaction. I see no logic in pressing that charge... probably why he dropped it. What a punk. I don't know how these cops can sleep at night, being such ludicrous hypocrites. I guess that's how they get their jollies.
      • 7 Years Ago
      Saw an update at http://www.shadowmonkey.net/ that says the officer wants to withdraw his application for an arrest warrant, but that the couple got a letter from a lawyer telling them to cease-and-desist from interfering with the cop's ability to make a living.
      • 7 Years Ago
      In some states people have been arrested under wiretapping laws for videotaping police. As we in the U.S. gleefully move closer to a police state, this is how the police are retaliating against being policed themselves by camera.
      GotThatVibe
      • 7 Years Ago
      Ohhh, so Autoblog just left out the part about the emails from the couple to the officer. Depending on their nature, that could possibly give him a basis for stalking. Hard to say without more info. But that's not what's important here anyway...
      bobdonadio
      • 7 Years Ago
      As a practicing attorney and former prosecutor I am sure that the officer was advised that if he contnued with the charges against the homeowner and lost, he could have been sued civilly and lost a large amount of money.
      CARMELA
      • 7 Years Ago
      Not another "corrupt" cop trying to get out of a ticket. Face it YOU GOT BUSTED!!!! NOW QUIT YOUR WHINING AND GO PAY YOUR TICKET!!!!
      • 7 Years Ago
      I should do something like this, I have the same problems they do where I live
      • 7 Years Ago
      >> This is like a home invader suing you for shooting his larcenous ass

      In places like much of Europe, and also in California, this is the mentality of most lawmakers, shockingly enough.
      • 7 Years Ago
      If cops aren't held to the same standards we are, what is the point of the law anyway?
      • 7 Years Ago
      I would simply publish an advertisement about the police officer and police department using intimidation to protect their own lack of willingness to abide by the law.

      BTW, the speeding problem in my county is nothing short but an illustration of how far it is out of control. "An acceptable response to why you were speeding includes, 'I was attemping to keep up with traffic.'"

      Dang, maybe I should employ that if I go nuts and begin a killing spree. I could claim to be attempting to be keeping up with the Jones. If the Police are not going to follow public safety rules, then why should anyone else? That is the message this police department is projecting.
      • 7 Years Ago
      They have a right to put those radar traps up, since it is THEIR Property. I don't see that cop paying for their taxes. Loser.
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