• Jan 23, 2007


Click on the image above for our 12-image high-resolution gallery from the Montreal launch.

Legendary Corvette tuner Callaway's latest creation, the C16, was unveiled in pre-production guise at the LA show back in November, but the final production version made its debut at the Montreal auto show, of all places. Why Montreal? Company founder Reeves Callaway, who was on hand together with designer Paul Deutschman to unveil the new car, explained that because Montreal is Deutschman's home town, it was only fitting. (If the C16 hadn't already made its big splash in LA, we're sure they wouldn't have shown it first at such a minor show as Montreal.)

There were only a few differences between the orange pre-production car shown in LA and the red, final version unveiled in Montreal. The LA car had a custom brake package, while the Montreal car's were stock; the orange car had a custom interior, while the red car's cabin was unmolested; and around back the distinctive chome-tipped "Double-D" exhaust outlets were enlarged on the Montreal car to what the boys from the factory jovially called the "Triple-D" exhaust. If it seems backwards that they left the brakes and interior stock; remember that each Callaway creation is built to order, and evidently this customer didn't want to spring for the upgraded stopping power and custom cabin.

Like the LA show car, this C16 features a supercharged six-liter Corvette V8 pumping out a whopping 616 horses, enough to propel this Callaway to sixty in less than three-and-a-half seconds. Apart from the roof, greenhouse glass and side mirrors, every body panel on the C16 is changed from the C6 Corvette on which it's based, and the result is a car that looks half Corvette, half Ferrari, but distinctively Callaway.

(We had a chance to talk with Reeves Callaway at the launch... watch this space for the highlights.)

Click here or on any of the images below for our 12-image high-resolution gallery from the Montreal launch.



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