• Jan 7, 2007
click on image above to view 68 high-resolution images of the Tundra CrewMax


Constantly pushing to increase its stake in the US market, Toyota debuted in Detroit today the Tundra CrewMax, a spy shot of which we brought you a month ago. The CrewMax is a full four-door version of the company's new, all-American full-size pick-up, The regular and double-cab of the Tundra made their debuts at the Chicago show last February, and will reportedly be in showrooms this February, with the new CrewMax following in March.

More on the Tundra after the jump, as well as Toyota's full press release with more specs and detailed info. You can also view our high-resolution gallery full of 68 (!) pics, some live and some official glamour shots.


With the new CrewMax, the Tundra range incorporates no less than 31 different configuration combinations, with three cab styles, three wheelbases, three bed lengths, three trim levels and three engine choices, with either four- or two-wheel-drive. Speaking of engine choices, Toyota has now officially confirmed that the Tundra's 5.7-liter V8 produces 381 horsepower at 5,600 rpm and 401 lb.-ft of peak torque at 3,600 rpm. Compare that with the new Silverado's Vortec 6.0-liter V8 that produces 367 horsepower at 5,500 rpm and 375 ft-lbs. of torque at 4,300 rpm.

On the new Tundra, Toyota shifted each of the cab styles up a notch in size, as well. The Regular Cab has as much room behind the seats as an ordinary extended cab, the Double Cab has space to rival most crew cabs, and the CrewMax has interior space that would make most SUVs feel cramped. An exclusive (and welcome) feature in pick-up trucks, the rear seat on the CrewMax slides forward and back within a 10-inch range and can be reclined backwards. There's even a full-feature automatic sliding power sunroof available that further blurs the line between full-size, four-door pick-ups and sport-utility trucks. Some of our living rooms don't have the wealth of features standard on the Tundra CrewMax.

The new Tundra is certainly an imposing truck with styling as tough as its construction, and with the addition of the CrewMax has finally swung its last leg over the ropes and entered a ring full of equally imposing competitors.


PRESS RELEASE:

Toyota Stages World Debut of All-new 2007 Tundra CrewMax At The 2007 North American International Auto Show

January 7, 2007 – Detroit - Toyota Motor Sales (TMS), U.S.A., Inc., unveiled the all-new 2007 Tundra CrewMax full-size pickup at a press conference here today at the 2007 North American International Auto Show. CrewMax, arriving at dealers in March, will join the Tundra Regular Cab and Tundra Double Cab models, which arrive in February.

Designed, engineered and built in America, the formidable Tundra line-up will set a new standard in the full-size pickup truck segment for performance, capability, standard safety features and styling.

"Tundra brings proven Toyota engineering, quality and durability to an intensely competitive full-size pickup market," said Jim Lentz, Toyota Motor Sales executive vice president. "The all-new Tundra is a historical launch for Toyota, because we are significantly increasing our production potential and presence in the full-size pickup truck category."

Larger in every dimension than the model it replaces, the 2007 Tundra is available in 31 model configurations, with a choice between 4x2 and 4x4 drivetrains. The 2007 Tundra offers three cab styles, three wheelbases, three bed lengths, three engines, and three trim levels. Tundra has been engineered for "true truckers" and can be configured to serve as a work truck, recreational truck or luxury family truck.

The 2007 Tundra brings the "power of the fist" design theme of the Toyota FTX Concept Truck to the showroom. From the side, the body's distinct "barbell" form with pronounced wheel arches conveys the truck's inherent strength. Character lines and fender flares add dimension and strength as well as an unwavering stance. The SR5 and Limited Grade models stand apart with a bold chrome grille surround.

Tundra backs up its tough new styling with the performance of an available new 381-horsepower 5.7-liter i-Force V8 engine teamed to a new six-speed automatic transmission. The i-Force 5.7 is one of the most powerful engines to be made available in a half-ton full-size pickup.

Tundra offers three cab styles: Regular Cab, four-door Double Cab, and the super-sized four-door CrewMax with the segment's leading rear-seat legroom. Tundra Regular Cab comes in DX trim level and can be upgraded to SR5 with an option package; the Double Cab and CrewMax models come in SR5 and Limited trim levels. Tundra offers high levels of user technology, including available Bluetooth cell phone compatibility, high-end audio and an optional navigation system that integrates a wide-screen rear backup camera.

Power for Big Jobs
The 2007 Tundra offers three levels of power. In Regular and Double Cab models, a standard 4.0-liter V6 produces 236 horsepower at 5,200 rpm and a healthy 266 lb.-ft. of peak torque at 4,000 rpm. The mid-grade option for these models – and standard for the CrewMax models – is an enhanced version of the proven Tundra's 4.7-liter i-Force V8 producing 271 horsepower at 5,400 rpm and 313 lb.-ft. of peak torque at 3,400 rpm.

Tundra models equipped with the 4.0-liter engine will have city/highway fuel economy ratings of 17/20 mpg. Tundra 4x2 and 4x4 models equipped with the 4.7-liter engine will both have city/highway fuel economy ratings of 15/18 mpg.

Both the V6 and the i-Force 4.7 V8 feature DOHC 4-valve cylinder heads and Variable Valve Timing with intelligence (VVT-i) for responsive power across the engine's operating range. Both engines are teamed exclusively with a five-speed automatic transmission that offers greater flexibility than competitors' four-speed automatics.

Updated flex lock-up torque converter control enhances transmission response and efficiency. For added driver control, the Tundra five-speed automatic features uphill / downhill shift logic. All Tundra models feature sequential shift as standard equipment.

i-Force 5.7 – A Force to be Reckoned With
The Tundra's trump card under the hood is an all-new 5.7-liter i-Force V8 that is available in every model configuration. Specifically designed for full-size pickup applications, the i-Force 5.7 uses a long-stroke configuration (stroke dimension of 4.02 in. is more than the bore width of 3.70 in.). As a result, in addition to its impressive 381 horsepower at 5,600 rpm, the i-Force 5.7 unleashes 401 lb.-ft of peak torque at 3,600 rpm.

Tundra 4x2 and 4x4 models equipped with the 5.7-liter engine will have city/highway fuel economy ratings of 16/20 mpg and 14/18 mpg, respectively.

The i-Force 5.7 V8 uses aluminum for the cylinder block and DOHC heads. This engine's more advanced Dual VVT-i controls valve timing and overlap on both the intake and exhaust valves, which also helps optimize power, fuel efficiency and emissions.

On all Tundra engines, the Acoustic Control Induction System (ACIS) uses butterfly valves inside intake manifold to switch the length of the intake tract in two stages, based on rpm and throttle angle, to improve torque across the engine speed range. Tubular stainless steel headers flow into a full stainless steel exhaust system with laser-welded, high-capacity mufflers for optimal efficiency and a commanding, powerful sound.

The i-Force 5.7 and 4.7 share a crank-hold electronic starter control that uses a "twist and release" ignition switch. The ECM controls the starter relay to prevent failed starts and "grinding" on a re-start attempt. Both the 5.7- and 4.7-liter Tundra engines meet the Ultra-Low Emissions Vehicle, or ULEV II, emissions certification.

The i-Force 5.7 is teamed exclusively with a new six-speed automatic transmission, which is only slightly larger than the five-speed automatic. Shift logic adapts the transmission's shift maps to driver input.

Both Tundra transmissions use new Toyota "WS" (world-standard) fluid with a flat viscosity/temperature curve (cold viscosity is close to warm viscosity). This fluid reduces friction and wear, enables faster vehicle warm-up, and never needs to be replaced.

Next year, select 2009 Tundra models equipped with the 5.7-liter V8 will offer flexible fuel capability with E85 ethanol.

Chassis Built for Capability, Control and Ride Quality
The 2007 Tundra is built on a new frame that is optimized for vigorous work duty, impact safety, and ride quality. There are three Tundra wheelbases: 126.8 inches for Regular Cab/standard bed models; 145.7 inches for Regular Cab/long bed, Double Cab/standard bed and CrewMax models, and a massive 164.6 inches for Double Cab/long bed models.

The Tundra's advanced TripleTech frame uses wide, full-boxed frame rails for the front portion, reinforced C-channel under the cab and an open C-channel underneath the bed to maximize strength, ride quality and durability.

Compared to the previous Tundra, the new model features more reinforced areas, increased high strength steel, increased steel gauge, and higher-rigidity suspension mounts. The engineering pays dividends in both work capability and ride-and-handling.

The double A-arm front suspension uses coil-over spring shock units, and a front-mounted steering rack helps enhance steering feel and response. The Tundra is equipped with the largest standard wheels in the segment – 18 x 8 inches with 255/70 R18 tires. Limited grade models step up to standard 18 x 8-inch aluminum-alloy wheels with wider 275/65 R18 tires. As an option, Limited models can be outfitted with factory-optional 20-inch alloy wheels with 275/55 R20 tires.

Compared to the previous Tundra, an increased tire-turning angle reduces the turning radius. The rear suspension features staggered shocks that are mounted outboard of the leaf springs to improve the shock's dampening efficiency. Spring rates have been tuned to provide a flat vehicle stance when fully loaded, and the spring "toe-out" mounting improves towing stability. Tuned bump stops improve controllability with large loads.

An optional TRD (Toyota Racing Development) Off-Road Package is available and combines off-road tuned suspension featuring Bilstein gas-charged mono-tube shock absorbers; 275/65 R18 B.F. Goodrich Radial T/A off-road tires on unique 18-inch alloy wheels; fog lamps, and special graphics.

The Segment's Most Advanced Brakes
Toyota equipped all new-model Tundras with the segment's most advanced standard braking systems. The four-wheel disc brake system uses large ventilated rotors front and rear: the front rotors measure 13.9 inches in diameter and 1.26-inches thick, with four-piston calipers. The rear discs measure 13.6 x 0.71-inch and use two-piston calipers. Anti-lock brakes (ABS) with Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD) and Brake Assist (BA) are standard on all models.

EBD optimizes brake pressure at each wheel for greater control under braking, especially when cornering. The Brake Assist system is designed to determine if the driver is attempting emergency braking. If the driver has not pressed firmly enough on the brake pedal to engage the ABS, the system supplements the applied braking power until pedal pressure is released.

A New Level of Pickup Truck Traction Management
The 2007 Tundra scores another first for the full-size pickup truck segment by equipping every model with the company's most advanced traction-enhancing dynamic control. First, the standard Automatic Limited-slip Differential (A LSD) provides computer-controlled cross-axle torque management that allows some wheel-spin (necessary for some surfaces). Compared to a conventional mechanical limited slip differential, the A-LSD system helps provide better acceleration in deep sand or mud and on low- or mixed-friction surfaces.

The combination of A-LSD and Vehicle Stability Control (VSC) as standard equipment on every model is a significant first in the segment. In contrast, some competitors restrict these important safety systems to certain models. The Tundra's VSC system integrates traction control (TRAC) on all models, and enhances traction on or off-road by helping to keep the vehicle going on its intended course. VSC detects front-wheel slide and rear-wheel slide during cornering and attempts to control either condition with throttle intervention and/or by braking individual wheels.

The integration of these technologies also brings with it driver-selectable versatility to tackle just about any road surface or driving condition. "Normal" mode enables all traction and stability capability. "TRAC Off" activates A-LSD, to help extricate the Tundra from extreme conditions. The "VSC Off" mode turns off all of these systems.

4x4 Capability
The combination of A-LSD and VSC gives the two-wheel drive Tundra models far better traction in more situations than could once be expected from a pickup truck. For more demanding conditions, Tundra's 4x4 configurations offer a part-time, shift-on-the fly four-wheel drive system featuring a six-pinion planetary reduction gearset to provide HIGH and LOW ranges. The driver selects the drive mode using a dial on the dash.

The V6 and i-Force 4.7 V8 Tundra models' rear differential uses a 9.5-inch ring gear, and the i-Force 5.7 models step up to a 10.5-inch ring gear – one of the largest in the segment. All Tundra differentials are made using new machining technology: "face hob" gear cutting for ring and pinion gears yields stronger tooth form and a greater engagement area for increased torque capacity and reduced gear noise.

Safety
On the safety front, all Tundra models feature the STAR safety system as standard equipment. As a result, Tundra will offer one of the most comprehensive suite of standard safety equipment in the full-size pickup market. The STAR safety system found on all of Toyota's SUVs includes ABS, Electronic Brakeforce Distribution (EBD), Brake Assist, Vehicle Stability Control (VSC) and Traction Control (TRAC). Tundra is the first full-size pickup to feature standard front and rear seat side and roll-sensing side curtain airbags in all models. Three-point seatbelts and adjustable headrests for all seating positions are likewise firsts in the segment. The front seatbelts integrate pretensioners and force limiters.

Towing Capability
The optional Tow Package for i-Force V8 models increases towing capacity significantly, up to 10,800 pounds, depending on the model and drivetrain (see specification sheet). The Tow Package is available on all V8 models and is standard on Double Cab Long-Bed models.

The Tow Package starts with a one-piece hydro-formed towing receiver integrated into the frame prior to bed installation. The structure attaches to each side of the frame around the rear spring shackles' frame cross-member with 12 bolts. Tow Package rear springs provide increased full-load rear suspension height and maintain full range of suspension travel. The Tundra stays level even with 1,000 lbs. of tongue weight or payload.

The Tow Package also upgrades Tundra's cooling and electrical systems. A water-to-oil engine oil cooler speeds engine warm-up and reduces friction at startup. The automatic transmission fluid warmer – first in the segment – warms the fluid quickly under cold ambient conditions, and the instrument panel gains an automatic transmission fluid (ATF) temperature gauge. A power steering fluid cooler is added below the radiator.

Electrical upgrades include an under-dash connector pigtail for a third-party trailer brake controller, both a seven-pin and a four-pin trailer brake connector near the hitch, and a higher output alternator (depending on engine). The final touch is a set of optional telescoping towing mirrors (available on 5.7-liter V8 models only). When the Tow Package is ordered for the 5.7-liter-equipped Tundra, its six-speed automatic transmission gains a TOW/HAUL shift mode, selectable by a dedicated switch. The TOW/HAUL shift mode applies specific logic for transmission upshift and downshift control, favoring and holding lower gears when accelerating or decelerating to enhance driver control and safety.

Three Bed Sizes
Tundra Regular Cab and Double Cab models are offered in standard bed
(78.7-inch) or long bed (97.6-inch) configurations; the CrewMax comes with a short bed (66.7-inch). In all models, the bed measures 22.2 inches deep. The Tundra's new lockable all-steel tailgate, with tailgate assist, can be effortlessly opened and closed with just two fingers – and it can easily be removed. A standard cargo lamp provides generous illumination at night.

A Deck Rail System, standard on Limited grade models and available on all others, adds to cargo bed versatility. Featuring adjustable tie-down cleats connected to the rails of the all-steel bed, the rail system can be used to secure many types of loads, with a 220 lbs. rating per attachment. The roster of Genuine Toyota Accessories available for the Tundra includes a number of cargo bed enhancements, including a tonneau cover, bed mat, bed liner, bed extender, Deck Rail accessories, storage boxes, cargo divider, tie-downs and utility hooks.

Front Office "Command and Control"
Inside the new Tundra, the driver is surrounded by a U-shaped "command and control" center that helps provide an unobstructed view of the road and gauges, while keeping all knobs, switches and buttons within easy reach. Dash and door panel forms emphasize function yet are far from austere.

Before crafting the Tundra interior, the designers studied "true truckers," customers who put the greatest demands on their pickups, including ranchers, foremen and construction workers. Because many true truckers wear protective clothing as part of their jobs, the new Tundra features large door handles and easy to turn control knobs that can be operated even while wearing work gloves.

Owners who spend a lot of time on the job site often use their trucks as mobile offices, so the designers gave Tundra increased storage capacity for this usage. The 3.4-liter upper glove box can hold a standard Thermos™ bottle, with additional space available in the 9.5-liter lower glovebox. The massive center console on bucket-seat models can hold a laptop computer or hanging file folder storage – a pickup truck first. For optimal comfort, the center console armrest features a four-inch slide range. The Tundra cockpit provides two 12v DC power outlets – one on the dash and one in the center console. CrewMax models add a third outlet at the rear of the center console. For added convenience, the outlets remain live for up to two hours after the ignition is switched off.

Room and Comfort for the Whole Crew
The Regular Cab offers more behind-the-seat storage than other pickups, and the Double Cab features front-hinged doors that open to 80 degrees for easy passenger access.

The Tundra Double Cab models provide a roomy rear seat with a 22-degree backrest angle and 34.7 inches of rear legroom for comfort on par with some midsize sedans. The Tundra CrewMax lives up to its name, providing a limousine-like best in class rear legroom at 44.5 inches in its rear most position. Moreover, CrewMax rear seat versatility is enhanced with the segment's only reclining and sliding rear seat. A 10-inch slide range allows the owner to custom-tailor passenger comfort and room for onboard cargo. CrewMax models provide additional storage under the rear seat.

On Double Cab and CrewMax models, the standard power rear windows retract completely into the doors. The Regular and Double Cab models offer a split sliding rear window to enhance interior ventilation, with a power vertical slide-down rear window standard on CrewMax models.

The 2007 Tundra offers four interior colors, including richly textured fabrics and deep-grain leathers available in four colors. As another nod to refinement, CrewMax limited models offer an optional power tilt/sliding moonroof with an automatic variable-position wind deflector.

Interior Storage
Toyota maximized space and added convenience within all Tundra cabs. A concealed compartment to the right of the shift lever can hold a Thomas® guidebook. The built-in toolbox behind the rear seat of all models provides clean, accessible storage for the jack, handle and lug wrench. In Double Cab and CrewMax models, the rear seat backs fold in an easy one-hand operation to provide a flat floor storage area. In all Tundra models, the front doors feature large storage pockets and can also hold two 22-ounce bottles. Rear doors on Double Cab and CrewMax each hold one bottle.

Leave the Job Site Behind Once You Get Inside
Once inside with the doors closed, occupant comfort starts with controlling the temperature. Standard High Solar Energy Absorbing (HSEA) glass helps filter solar heat and most UV (skin-sensitive) light energy entering the vehicle, reducing occupants' sun exposure, helping to keep the interior cooler and enhancing durability of interior materials. Limited grade models receive standard IR-cut glass, further reducing solar levels from infrared rays.

The Regular Cab DX and all SR5 grade models come standard with a versatile dual-zone manual climate control system with a seven-speed blower, sync-mode and a replaceable dust and pollen filter. In Limited grade models, the standard dual-zone automatic climate control system features a segment-first independent upper/lower temperature control. Its cooling performance reduces cabin-cooling time by five to 10 minutes compared to the previous Tundra.

The four-spoke steering wheel features standard audio controls in Limited grade and on the Double Cab with the optional JBL audio system. The available manual tilt and telescoping steering wheel is a first in the segment, as is the available power tilt and telescoping steering wheel. Showing Toyota's attention to detail, the rolling-ball telescoping steering shaft improves wheel-tilt feel compared to splined-sliding types.

Tundra Limited models give up none of the work ethic and add more refinement than ever seen on a Toyota pickup. A few more notable features that distinguish the Limited Grade models include: chrome, power-retractable, heated auto-dimming side-view mirrors; leather-trimmed, heated power-adjustable front bucket seats (10-way for driver, 4-way for passenger); an overhead console; rear door privacy glass; Optitron meters and a multi-information center featuring selectable readouts for the clock, outside temperature, and fuel economy; and a user-customizable interface that allows the Tundra owner to set keyless entry feedback; door unlock mode (one press/two press); automatic door locking programming; headlight auto-off timer, and the interior light timer.

Options to Entertain and Inform
The Regular Cab DX model comes with a standard AM/FM/CD stereo with four speakers and an audio input jack; SR5 models add a six-speaker system, and Limited grade models upgrade to a standard JBL AM/FM audio system with six-disc in-dash CD changer, 440-Watt 5.1 channel surround sound, 10 speakers (12 in CrewMax), Bluetooth® compatibility, and steering wheel audio controls. This system (with 10 speakers) is an option for the SR5 grade. All Tundra audio systems can play MP3/WMA formatted CDs.

CrewMax models offer an optional Rear Seat Entertainment (RSE) system that combines a nine-inch wide-screen LCD monitor, DVD player, two sets of wireless headphones and a remote control.

An available DVD navigation system includes a JBL audio system and integrates a rear backup camera. The camera automatically projects an image of what its lens can detect behind the vehicle onto the navigation system's LCD screen when reverse gear is engaged, excellent when backing up the Tundra to a trailer, or for positioning a boat trailer on a launch ramp.

A multifunction rear view mirror, standard on Limited grade models and optional for others, combines an electrochromic auto-dimming mirror with a digital compass and HomeLink® transceiver.

Backed by Toyota
Toyota's 36-month/36,000-mile basic new-vehicle limited warranty applies to all components other than normal wear and maintenance items. Additional 60-month warranties cover the powertrain for 60 months/60,000 miles and corrosion perforation for 60 months with no mileage limitation.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 62 Comments
      • 8 Years Ago
      Well, coming from a semi-redneck (well, my lineage is more semi-hick than redneck), I kinda like the Tundra. We've always been Chevy people, and I love GM drivetrains. They hold up and pull hard while the vehicle rattles and falls apart around them! ;)

      My question is how will the Tundra be 200,000 miles later, having seen it's fair share of abuse and overloading. I'll wait four or five years to make my judgement.

      I wish they had a stripped down, vinyl seat, rubber floor trim option though. That's about the only thing that would keep me from wanting one as a work or farm truck. Of course, seeing that I only buy well used now, I guess nice carpet won't really matter.

      About the Made in America part. Who has created more jobs in recent history, GM or Toyota? People say "yeah, but the damn Japs are getting rich!" I would ask them are the Americans getting rich from GM really your friends? I like Chevy trucks and Ford cars, but damn if I consider either company my friend.
      • 8 Years Ago
      In only a snap of the fingers, some posters forget the passed problems with their favorite two truck manufacturers. Leaking manifold gaskets that cause hydrolock. Gas engines that sounded like diesels straight from the factories. Exploding clutchs and turbo chargers. Is it because they chose to ignore the problems or felt it's normal to have expensive troubles with your truck?
      Dollars earned by the workforce making Toyotas are spent localy. Get over who pays them. Many countries pay for American companies to enjoy profit. If you don't like it, then think what will happen if the rest of the world has the same attitude to American products as you do to the Japanese product.
      • 8 Years Ago
      It might be rated to tow 10,500 lbs but this new Toyota still doesn't offer a HD truck as evidenced by the 5 bolt wheels versus eight on a 3/4 ton HD. They still have a long way to go in making a real truck.
      • 8 Years Ago
      Still ugly...

      I am disappointed. With all that extra power, its rated to tow only 300 more pounds than the F-150 (10,500lbs).

      Toyota really dropped the ball on this one...
      • 8 Years Ago
      It seems like the Toyota has the same strategy as Dodge Ram in that it had no Extended Cab. Instead they have a regular 4-Door (Dual Cab / Quad Cab) and a BIG 4-Door (CrewMax / Mega Cab).

      I admit I’m not a large pick-up buyer, but are customers really looking for a truck with “limousine-like” rear seating?

      Big engine… great.
      Big back seat (and a short bed)… why?
      • 8 Years Ago
      some initial impressions from looking at the photos:

      1) where is the 20" wheel option? if one of the wheels shown is a 20, they sure are ugly.

      2) if Toyota is going to option everything in packages like they now do (and I'm sure they are) this thing is going nowhere. the packages are just too expensive, and you need to buy many things you don't want. on domestic trucks, once you get to the mid-line model (XLT on Ford, SLT on Dodge, LT1 on Chevrolet), just about everything is available as a separate option, so you can outfit your truck exactly as you want it. not so here.

      3) full-size trucks are in the land of incentives, and if they don't plan on matching the big guys, it's not going to sell. dollars are dollars, and I don't care who makes it. Ford, Dodge, and Chrevrolet all have excellent products; people shop by price and incentives.

      4) it sounds like it would be very difficult to install a hitch on a non-tow package truck. they (of course!!) only make the towing mirrors available in a package. contrast that with the real domestic trucks, with have the mirrors as a free-standing option on even the lowest-line trucks.

      5) unless something drastic changes, they will not succeed. presently, over 85% of Tundra and Titan trucks are sold to people who trade in Toyotas and Nissans (respectively) on them. this is truly death on the manufacturers, as they need new blood buying their products, not present customers trading in their own products. there is no growth here.

      6) it is interesting that they are not matching the GM warranty. when you're the new guy, you have to do something to entice people to buy your product. the "but it's a Toyota" excuse will not play well when the nearest dealer is 250 miles away. when you get to many parts of the country, there are no people who drive imports. I could count on one hand (with some empty fingers) how many people I know (anywhere) who drive import cars or trucks. I live in a rural area in Arizona, and within 2 two square mile area, there is not one single import of any kind.

      this will be a very hard nut for Toyota to crack; presently, almost all Toyota dealers are in large cities, and even with Toyota's push to place "satellite" dealers in smaller towns, this will take years.

      7) I don't what all the hoopla is about these huge crew-cab trucks. one simple fact here; the overall size of the truck never changes, so that extra rear-seat space has to come from somewhere. it's usually from the bed.

      8) the one thing that does sound good is the interior being available in four colors. I just hope it isn't two shades of gray, and two of beige. it's about time we have other interior colors available again besides these two.

      Mike
      • 8 Years Ago
      looks like autoblog fulfilled its redneck, domestic-fanboy comment quota for today, and all in one post!

      just mention "toyota" + "trucks" and there they come a' runnin!
      • 8 Years Ago
      Idiots, including Tim UF. The Tundras ARE built in America!!!!! I belive in a plant in San Antonio. These trucks are more american than "jap," as you so eloquntly put it. I have a feeling that these tricks will be a hge hit. glad I own toyota stock!
      • 8 Years Ago
      Toyota is fast approaching #2 in NA without even offering a large truck. Now that they are offering one, how long until they are #1?
      • 8 Years Ago
      "59. I can't believe how stupid some of you dumb ass rednex are, you probably can't even read this!

      This truck is gonna blow American trucks out of the water. And yeah it'll still be driving around in 10 years when your Frods (Frauds) and Chevy's have bit the dust. American vehicles are over! Toyota is #1 for a good reason. They build quality.

      Get a life you freaking rednex.

      Posted at 12:51AM on Jan 9th 2007 by Rednex Suk 0 stars"


      Dude, why does this post keep getting bumped?

      Maybe because it's mis-informed?

      Saying that GM, Ford and/or DC doesn't build quality trucks is silly!

      The sales they post are awesome! More F150s are sold than Camrys. The combined sales of Silverado/Sierra are outsell Camry! Both trucks are rock-solid reliable and class leaders because of the loyalty of purchasers-because they know they are reliable, durable and the most functional trucks on the market.

      This is beginning to sound like when the last Tacoma came out.... the Titan came out ...the T1000 came out.

      This "American Truck Owners are Rednecks" thing just sound dumb. After all F150s are sold to women more then men!

      Travis-you are still a bs artist! Sure-ALL the trucks on the farm are constantly in the garage! The experience of millions of people throughout the world flys in the face of your post.

      Hey Autoblog! How come nothing about the Toyota Sludge settlement? Just google "toyota" and "sludge".
      • 8 Years Ago
      "53. Dear Sam,

      Yeah you read me right an 06 with 160,000 on the odo....its called driving around all day on a 6,000 acre farm... you are a smart one....and it was purchased nov 05.... you and hillary clinton should have dinner tonight.

      Thanks

      Posted at 8:40PM on Jan 8th 2007 by travis 0 stars"


      So let me think......

      160000 over 13 months.....

      That's 12300 miles a month.
      That's 3100 miles a week
      450 miles a day.

      That's working 7 days a week!!!!!

      So you drove on the 6000 acre farm about 9 hours a day at about 50 miles an hour....seven days a week!

      No days off!
      No time to load the truck!
      No time to fuel the truck!


      When are you all finding time to eat?


      How is this truck in the shop "all the f_______ time" ?!?!?!

      You guys don't take time to eat-how do you get all that mileage on the truck-that's in the shop all the time!?!?!?

      When you tell a whopper man, make it at least believable!!!!!



      When are you all finding time to eat.
      • 8 Years Ago
      Patriot One - When has Toyota ever claimed such ridiculousness?

      I think it looks great, I have a 2000 Tundra and can't wait to get a new one. Would really like to compare the interior, I was a little disappointed at the LA Auto show with the interiors of GM’s new trucks. Sure it a tad better then the old one but can’t GM fine some better plastics.

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