Thanks to the 1961 Continental, one of the first things many car fans imagine when they hear "classic Lincoln" is suicide doors. Therefore it's only logical we'd come to expect them on any signature Lincoln show car. The 2002 Continental concept had them, and so did the 2003 Navicross concept. So why did Ford decide to leave them off the striking MKR concept? Automotive News quotes the MKR's exterior designer, Xitij Mistry, saying conventional doors were used on the concept because they're easier to put into production. Hmmm. That's interesting. Does this mean the MKR is a shoo-in for production? Could be. "I love it, love it, love it. To me, it almost looks like a production car, and that was a bit of a surprise. It's real, and that's a good thing," said Pat Schiavone, director of the design team at the beginning of the MRK project.

One more interesting design note on the MKR after the jump.

[Source: Automotive News]

Another interesting note out of Automotive News' talk with the MKR's designer team concerns the car's front seat interior door handles. It seems the cars' interior designer, Jason Baldas, went through dozens of different sketches, none of which pleased the bosses. So one night Baldas broke protocol by sculpting his favorite sketch from clay. That did the trick and you can see here the elegant shape Baldas envisioned in one of his earliest drawings.

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