The University of Hertfordshire will soon open the Sustainable Energy Tehnologies Centre (SETCE), and the goal is to build the world's "greenest" cars. The University has entered into a Knowledge Transfer Project with ITM Power to develop the use of elecrolytic hydrogen in internal combustion engines. A future goal includes developing methods to refuel hydrogen at home or work. Researchers will also test hydrogen in the diesel combustion process. The center will be located on the university's College Lane campus (shown).

Full release after the break.

[Source: University of Hertfordshire]

New Hertfordshire Sustainable Energy Technologies Centre launches to build "greener" cars



Tuesday, December 12, 2006

A centre to build the world's "greenest" cars is being launched at the University of Hertfordshire this month.

The final touches are being put on the building at the University's College Lane campus, which will house the Sustainable Energy Technologies Centre (SETCE), an operation which will bring very significant advances in the global quest to move to zero carbon fuels.

Mr Derek Eade, Director of SETCE, commented: "As petrol and diesel are not able to be sustained in the coming future, we have needed to think about other ways of running cars."

As a result of this drive to minimise overall emissions of carbon dioxide by vehicles in the future, the University has entered into a Knowledge Transfer Project (KTP) with ITM Power Plc in developing the use of electrolytic hydrogen in vehicle engines, which will be developed at SETCE.

The aim of the joint development programme is to improve internal combustion engine emissions; with the potential to bring very significant advances in the global quest to move to zero carbon fuels.

The programme includes the following objectives:

· To develop a safe, low-cost modification package for a town car to run on hydrogen and to provide the ability to refuel the vehicle at home or at work, independently of the current fuel delivery infrastructure.

· To investigate the conversion of existing petrol fuelled electrical generating sets to run on hydrogen produced from zero carbon sources, such as solar and wind.

· To investigate how the addition of hydrogen to the diesel combustion process can either reduce fuel consumption or pollutants and to provide the necessary on-board hydrogen generator system for diesel engines.

ITM will own all the intellectual property (IP rights) including any new discoveries made during the development carried out under this programme.

Jim Heathcote, CEO, ITM Power Plc, said: "We believe this development programme will help to demonstrate the importance of electrolysers for use in the automotive industry. The University is renowned for its close automotive industry relationships, excellent test facilities and high calibre engineers. These capabilities are crucial to the success of this development programme."

Mr Eade added: "We believe that the development programme that we are jointly undertaking could be significant to the automotive industry. We hope it will accelerate the market penetration of clean renewable transportation fuels. Widely distributed electrolysers could address the cost and availability problems that have prevented the adoption of hydrogen as a competitive fuel. We hope the programme will successfully place the University and ITM Power at the forefront of the hydrogen economy."



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