• Nov 19, 2006

We previously brought you the skinny on the Italian police's Gallardo supercar, presented to the state officials by Lamborghini to celebrate the department's 152nd anniversary, providing them with a high-speed vehicle for law enforcement and emergency duties. But like the London police discovered with their demo-only Murcielago, Bologna Police Officer Daniele Turrini (that's a guy) admits the head-turning squad car is capable of causing more accidents than it prevents.

The video comes from CH7's tech show Beyond Tomorrow, and despite butchering the pronunciation (the double-L is pronounced as a Y), the Australian program gives an interesting up-close look at the technology on board the super-speedway patrol car.

[Source: High T3ch]



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 9 Comments
      • 8 Years Ago
      Easy on, she's Austraylian after all - therefore in perfect Australian it's actually a Galah-Dough.

      None of this Gay-Yard-Oh nonsense(!)
      • 8 Years Ago
      Well, with the release of Akon's song "Smack That," Americans everywhere are mispronouncing "Gallardo" ...and apparently Australians too.

      That song drives me crazy every single time...
      • 8 Years Ago
      Man, Kim is just ignorant. She's giving Australians a bad name.
      • 8 Years Ago
      BTW "Gallardo" is not italian but Spaniard.

      Lamborghini take their names for cars on later times from Spanish famous fighting bulls breeds, Gallardo (like Murcielago) was one of them, so it's pronounced in spanish, and the correct way to say "Gallardo" in spanish is not like an italian 'LL' (like in the english word "large" or like the journalist do in the video) but with a soft "y" like in "yard").

      • 8 Years Ago
      I mean, come on, how tough is it for actual journalists to learn how to correctly pronounce words?

      Morons!
      • 8 Years Ago
      Gah - Lard - Oh.
      • 8 Years Ago
      awesome! I kinda wish our black and white's could get the funding for the same kind of on board computer system the Italians have. live up date to HQ??? AWESOME! It's too bad our local and state cops dont get the funding to buy systems like that.

      As far as the car is concerned, it's really cool of lambo to do the kind of things they are to work with the Polizia. If Ford or GM could find it in their heats to give away a few Mustang Shelby GT's or Corvette ZO6's, I'm sure a lot less people would be going 80mph or more (like I do) on the inter-state. Not like the good ol' black and white vickies dont do a good enough job, it's just nice to give the people who protect and serve us a little gift now and then.
      • 8 Years Ago
      It's awesome to see the police actually using a Lamborghini as one of their patrol cars. But referring back to what that police guy said in the video, this super police car is probably prone to cause more accidents rather than preventing them. I was wondering why he said that but as the Austrailian reporter points out, drivers will undoubtedly take their eyes off the road in order to catch a glimpse of this rare once-in-a-lifetime sight. I mean, it's not everyday where you get to see a Lamborghini being used as a police car; so you'd probably stare at it as long as possible until it goes out of sight. But this is exactly why the car probably causes more accidents; because of how it distracts drivers from driving with their eyes on the road. Hmm. . looks like using a super police car won't change anything in terms of making the roads safer. In fact, it might just make things worse...
      • 8 Years Ago
      Your comments: Noah, over the top to use "butchering" to describe pronouncing the name of an Italian car the Italian or English way. Most of the comments are about the pronunciation, not a fine car used in a very Italian manner.
      The corrections in the comments are wrong. The car is
      named after SPANISH bulls, therefore the LL is said as Y. How do I know this? I looked it up, lol. (If the same sound were wanted in Italian, it would be spelled GAIARDO.)