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We've seen snipets of the growing diesel movement, but Robert Schoenberger of the Louisville Courier-Journal puts most of the subject into perspective with his lengthy analysis. He covers the improved quality, the impressive sales numbers, stricter emissions regulations and the automakers' strategy of offering more vehicles with diesel power. As a result of the renewed interest, factories are hiring more workers to assemble diesel engines.

The story quotes an industry analyst who says Honda can use its diesel technology to steal away hybrid customers from Toyota, noting that long commutes favor diesels. The only problem is getting the vehicles to market in a timely manner. The terrible image diesels still have in the minds of many consumers is a closing thought on the challenge facing the automakers to promote more diesel sales.

[Source: Louisville Courier-Journal]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 3 Comments
      • 8 Years Ago
      Bingo both of you!

      Journalists repeat "conventional wisdom" so often that they somehow believe it is truth.

      I've been driving Diesel cars since 1980, and yes, they were smoky and slow OVER 20 YEARS AGO. But Since the advent of turbocharging Diesels in the late 80s they have improved dramatically over the past twenty years. Every year they get better and better, while our choices as consumers have been narrower and narrower... all due to this false stigma being perpetuated at EVERY SINGLE mention of Diesel in the press.

      All they do is lose credibility when they repeat out of date facts.

      --chuck

      • 8 Years Ago
      I'm not sure I get this talk about the "terrible image" of diesels in the minds of consumers. When was that, in the 1970s? I'm 40 years old, and that was really before my time -- before I knew or cared much about cars anyhow. I'm sure it's been long enough that the public is ready to take another look at diesels.
      • 8 Years Ago
      Tony, I think you're absolutely right. As far as I can tell, this "terrible" image only seems to be a self perpetuating thing in the minds of reporters who aren't original enough to make up their own minds about diesels. Just about everyone that I know wish that there was a decent diesel option on the market, and personally, I can't wait for some to start appearing.