• Sep 25, 2006
Mercedes-Benz announced today that 2008 models of the M-, R- and GL-Class will be offered with BLUETEC diesel engines that meet the Environmental Protection Agency's tough BIN5 emissions standards in all 50 states. Astute Autoblog readers will remember that not long ago the 2007 Mercedes-Benz E320 BLUTEC failed to meet emissions standards in California and four other states. These 2008 models will use more advanced urea-injection technology to ensure that they earn the right to be sold nationwide. While Mercedes didn't mention which BLUTEC engine(s) will be available when these 2008 models go on sale, the likely candidate is the same 3.0-liter V6 turbodiesel used in the E320 BLUETEC that's been tweaked to pass muster in California and other states with stricter standards. There's also an option in Europe for a more powerful 4.0-liter V8 diesel engine, but Mercedes debuted a GL320 BLUETEC at the 2006 Detroit auto show, so our bet's on the diesel six.

[Source: Mercedes Benz]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 4 Comments
      • 8 Years Ago
      The EPA's BIN 5 standard holds no sway in CA. The engine needs to meet CARB's standards. Did they say it will also meet those?
      • 8 Years Ago
      Uh. The CARB standard *is* Bin5.
      • 8 Years Ago
      Screw Cali and their CARB emissions! More for us in the non-wacko states. Especially since they are sewing DaimlerChrysler (the parent of MB).
      • 8 Years Ago
      Innovative use of Diesel is the near and mid term answer to our automotive fuel problems. Using BioDiesel at about a B35 level requires no massive changes to infrastructure and it would not require planting all the agricultural land in America for fuel stock as would Ethanol (E85).

      The BioDiesels could be combined with "Full Plug-in Hybrids" or gas over hydraulic accumulator hybrids, or both, to achieve better that 80 MPG in full size sedans. In fact, the Big Three did achieve these MPGs in their demonstration cars in the mid to late 90s funded by a DOE project.

      Key points are: (1) No new infrastructure required, (2) Ultra High MPG, (3) low maintenance with diesels, (4) $$$ to American farmers instead of Middle East Oil sheiks, (5) low emissions, (6) people want to buy these environmentally friendly products, (7) very low green house gas emission and closed loop for the Bio component of CO2 (no net release), (8) positive effect on international trade and balance of payments, (9) develops new jobs in America, (10) uses proven and available technology.

      Also, auto makers should sell their 80 MPG cars under the 45 state standards. When the public in California and the other four states gets mad enough they will demand the same products as would be available in the Heartland and they would change their states dumb standards to something more reasonable.

      Go Diesel!!!

      It is fueling half the cars in Europe for a reason!