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The water molecules are flying after the executive producer of "Who Killed the Electric Car" responded to a test of the Chevy Sequel fuel cell vehicle by Joel Makower. A blogger on worldchanging.com, Makower said he found a "small beacon of hope" after driving the Sequel at the same GM event that I attended last week. Makower, who acknowledged he is a consultant to a strategy firm that has GM as a client, found the Sequel to drive much like a "normal car." Makower also reviewed the aspects of the hydrogen economy that have slowed or are slowly gaining momentum. He admits companies with a hydrogen future still have "long roads to travel" and encourages GM to push other eco-technologies. In the end, Makower sees some hope in the hydrogen economy.

In the comments section, the first to respond to Makower's post was Richard Titus, executive producer of "Who Killed the Electric Car?". Titus revived the myths about hydrogen. He closed by saying "We need to stop smoking the hydrogen pipe dream and get real with our addiction to oil."

Following Titus are at least 20 others with strong opinions for and against hydrogen. It all makes for interesting reading with plenty of links to support many of the views.

[Source: worldchanging.com]



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    • 1 Second Ago
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      • 6 Months Ago
      The Exec. Producer makes all very valid points but he's forgetting there is one way to make hydrogen without using natural gas, coal, or nuclear energy and that's biological.

      Research has already shown certain types of bacteria produce massive amounts of hydrogen as waste. In time, we can create a economy powered by a biological source - one the recycles wastes into usable energy. Our future is clear. Nature has had a blueprint on how to make different forms of energy as long as you stay within the bounds of "recycled biological energy" and yet we have ignored it, satisfied with draining our resources without putting anything valuable back.

      The Exec. Producer needs to do more research.
      puuchy
      • 6 Months Ago
      I for one agree. As a matter of fact algae is now taking on attention as a means of producing fuel. why not it grows fast so long as there is water and sun and it can produce between 5000-15000 gall. of biodiesel per acre in a year. check it out for yourselves, very interesting.