Dodge is the last of the full-size truck producers to indicate its plan of attack concerning the conversion of its diesel engine used in heavy-duty Ram pickups to meet new federal diesel emissions standards that take effect January 1st. Frank Klegon of the Chrysler Group says that heavy-duty diesel Rams sold after January 1st will feature expensive diesel particulate filters and oxides of nitrogen absorber. The two components will reduce the amount of oxides of nitrogen, but will also reduce the engine's performance as it further restricts the flow of exhaust through the exhaust system. The modified engine will be able to run on new Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel fuel that began being produced on June 1st and will available nationwide beginning January 1st.

GM has announced similar modifications for its Duramax diesels that include a new variable geometry turbo and exhaust gas recirculation system. Ford, meanwhile, will be dumping its troubled 6.0L Powerstroke diesel in favor of a new, cleaner 6.4L unit with equally expensive Piezo injectors.

AutoWeek indicates that both Dodge and GM may release new diesel powerplants in the near future since their current units will likely see a performance loss from these modifications.

[Source: AutoWeek]