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The US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia has upheld policy guidelines allowing the use of "regional recalls", which are campaigns limited to a particular geographical area. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration issued a letter in 1998 that established some guidelines for automakers to conduct recalls on selected vehicles based upon an assessment of the local driving environment. Consumer advocacy groups such as Public Citizen issued a legal challenge to this, claiming that such policy constituted "de facto regulation", and violated the Motor Vehicle Safety Act by not informing all owners of a pending safety investigation.

Such a regional campaign raised the ire of Wisconsin's attorney general late last year, when GM elected to recall trucks in 14 selected states due to a brake corrosion problem, but left out America's Dairyland out of the fun.

[Source: AP via Yahoo!]



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  • 3 Comments
      • 9 Years Ago
      Certainly makes sense to recall vehicles FIRST in areas where a safety problem is more likely (corosion issues in states where roads are salted in Winter).

      But cars do find their way to places other than where registered, so I think all should be recalled if a safety problem could occur.
      • 9 Years Ago
      I can understand that something like a recall for corrosion issues may not apply to owners in all states. But you have to wonder how Wis. got left out of the GM brake corrision recall.
      • 9 Years Ago
      "Such a regional campaign raised the ire of Wisconsin's attorney general late last year, when GM elected to recall trucks in 14 selected states due to a brake corrosion problem, but left out America's Dairyland out of the fun."
      It is a tough issue and it is a big dilemma. On the one hand, the issue of safety standard is a veyr important matter in USA while on the other side of the coin, US companies are losing to their asian rivals.
      Now, TATA in India is going to a car within $2,000 (http://www.indianraj.com/2006/06/2000_car_coming_within_2_years.html) by 2008. I wonder how it will fit into US safety standard.