• May 20, 2006

In response to the post, NuRide redefines carpooling, reader Trenton writes:

In the San Francisco Bay Area, we have Casual Carpool, which is very similar. Riders wait near bus stops and subway stations and drivers swing by. The carpool lanes are 3 in a car, so the driver picks up 2 people, and off they go. I've done it for years, as have many of my friends. No one has ever experienced a problem. Maybe it's safer here than where you guys live.

Trenton provides a link.  The simple rules, developed over 25 years, include no-line jumping while waiting for a vehicle, no payment, and silence unless the driver starts a conversation. Drivers waiting for passengers are advised to not block driveways or side streets. Note that two people can use certain car pool lanes if their vehicle is specifically built for two people (i.e., roadsters like the MX-5 or Solstice).

Have you ever used a carpooling service? Would you ever carpool? Have your say in 'Comments.'

[Source: Ridenow.org]



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 9 Comments
      • 8 Years Ago
      In the SF Bay Area, there's only one drop-off location, so it's not an issue. All cars go to the same spot. For the evening commute, the pickup area has signs which indicate were the riders are going. This commute isn't nearly as popular, though, since the Bay Bridge toll is only coming into the city, so carpool drivers have less of an incentive to pickup riders.

      As for buying a hybrid, you still have to park the thing. In San Francisco, that ranges from $12-$25 per day with monthly spots starting at about $250. You save a bundle if you don't need to drive.
      • 8 Years Ago
      There are actually two drop off points in the Bay Area - downtown and city center. Each has a separate line and the drivers and passengers just sort of know where to go and line up. I commuted from Berkeley to the city last summer and took casual carpool plenty of days. The riders don't chip in for gas but the driver doesn't have to pay the $3 toll so everyone benefits. I've also met some pretty cool people in strange cars.
      • 8 Years Ago
      How do you know where the car is going? Do they bring you wherever you want to go, or just where they're going? Sounds cool if it works, but I would expect the carpoolers to kick in some cash for gas every now and then, and I'd hope they wanted to go to the same place as me.
      • 8 Years Ago
      Carpooling is massively inconvenient. I would buy a hybrid.
      • 8 Years Ago
      I wonder if anyone met their spouse this way!! lol
      • 8 Years Ago
      "How do you know where the car is going? Do they bring you wherever you want to go, or just where they're going? Sounds cool if it works, but I would expect the carpoolers to kick in some cash for gas every now and then, and I'd hope they wanted to go to the same place as me."

      Scott,
      In the DC area, in the AM slugs line up at the Park-n-ride lots. The car needing one or more riders pulls up and shouts out their destination (ie Pentagon, L'Enfant Station, etc...) and in the order of the line, slugs going to said destination will get in. In the PM there are a few locations with slug lines (near Metro stops). Only difference is that there are signs for the different Park-n-ride lots. Simply get in line for the lot your car is parked in. Slugging works but you do have to allow a little extra time because you don't know how long it may take to get picked up.
      Also, the driver gets no gas money. Their compensation is the speed of getting to drive in the HOV. In Northern Virginia/DC that can literally cut your commute time in half.
      My father-in-law is seriously tight with his money so he slugs religiously. I ride a vanpool but when schedules don't mesh (or I oversleep) then it is nice to have the slug line at a backup.
      • 8 Years Ago
      In the Washington DC area (primarily Northern Virgina along I-95/395) this has existed for many years and is called "slugging".

      http://www.slug-lines.com/

      The most popular routes are between various points south, to Downtown DC and the Pentagon, or to points where sluggers can transfer to the Metro rail system.
      • 8 Years Ago
      here is what my carpool looks like in so cal.

      http://www.webwombat.com.au/entertainment/humour/images/carpool.jpg
      • 8 Years Ago
      standing on the side of the road, hoping someone picks you up - isn't that called hitchhiking????