• May 10, 2006
Volkswagen's innovative marriage of a supercharger and a turbocharger on the same 1.4-liter engine gained the automaker two prizes (one for each induction system?) at the "International Engine of the Year Awards 2006" - "Best Engine, 1-liter to 1.4-liter category", and "Best New Engine of 2006."

VW's "maximum power - minimum consumption" strategy for the TSI powerplant led to designers using a supercharger for low-range power, and a turbocharger for efficiency at higher rpm. The twincharger system is shown in the drawing at right.

The TSI is currently available in the Golf GT and the Touran.

[Source: Volkswagen]


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  • 23 Comments
      gbh
      • 8 Years Ago
      Jay, I would tend to agree with you about potential issues (even ignoring some of VW's quality issues of late).

      "Simplicate, and add lightness.."

      It is also hard to rationalize with cousin Porsche bringing back Variable Vane Turbos to automotive apps -garnering most (if not all) of the benefits without the added technical degree of difficulty. (In a rather sad publicity move, Porsche is claiming first use of Variable Vane on a production auto. Sad, because it was actually used on one of the huffed Shelbys of the mid 80's.)

      Subaru and Porsche have gotten away from two-stage, or sequential turbocharging and returned to single turbos for most but race apps. Like most other hardware, computers have allowed the turbocharger to be a far more efficient instrument than it was 10 years ago. Trying to tune sequentials to work smoothly on a street app is a PITA.
      • 8 Years Ago
      Jon,

      I think you are referring to a 2 stage turbo setup as opposed to a twin turbo setup.
      • 8 Years Ago
      The supercharger primes the engine/turbocharger before the high efficiency-high latency turbo comes up to speed.

      1.4 twincharger 168hp@6000, 177ft-lbs from 1750-4500, runs on 90AKI fuel, can hit 7000rpm, goes 137mph in Golf GT

      1.5 Honda Fit 109hp@5800, 105ft-lbs@4800, VTEC transition ~3400, can hit 6500rpm, hits 110mph with auto (4th gear), 114mph with manual (C&D comparison) questionable as to whether full power is made with 87AKI fuel
      • 8 Years Ago
      Peter,

      Are we talking about:

      The "coil class action" Already addressed extended warranty

      The front spoiler, I ran over a curb (my fault) but it's VW's fault because the car is too low since I boght it and I can't drive worth a shit class action?

      The, engine is sludged and I don't have any oil change invoices classaction, already addressed. Already addressed extended warranty

      The, my window fell down class action, already addressed extended warranty

      The, my aribag went off all by itself class action, where it has been proven the car hit something?

      The, car will not pass smog, class action already addressed extended warranty?

      The, "I don't know how to drive DMF clutch problems, class action lawsuits?

      Or this one "I don't like my dealer" class action lawsuit.

      If you paid for any of those you're really out of the loop. Because, you didn't have to.

      I travel a lot, I've used a pretty large number of VW dealers for normal service work while on the road and have yet to meet the SOL dealers. And I didn't have any 1,000 dollar repairs right out of warranty. You really need to get over the VW "cheap car syndrome too" they have not been cheap for a long time and folks also need to get over the VW "peoples car" thing as meaning, small and cheap.

      And in case you have not noticed, "cheap" does not sell all that well here and makes damn little in profit for the makers, why do you think everbody is moving upscale, even the Koreans?
      • 8 Years Ago
      In other news VW issued a premptive recall on all cars using this engine to fix reliability issues with supercharge seals, turbocharger bearings, faulty coil packs and bugs in the firmware.

      I'm kidding... if you don't follow VWs that wouldn't be as funny of a comment as it should have been... shame on you.


      --Noah
      • 8 Years Ago
      "Little wonder why MyVWLemon.com has such a vibrant community."

      Oh pleaseeeeeeeeeee, myvwlemon.com a "vibrant" community? Fully 1/4 of the comments are by one person a screen name of, up-the-river who thinks he's an engineer and and an oil expert, most of his repair suggestions are bullshit. There are about 10 posters who hog the site on a regular basis and a webmaster who censors tons of posts of any pro VW comments.

      Then take a real hard look at the problem years 2000-2002 mostly and that mirrors the coil and window problems, all addressed by VW. Then read the posts, the majority now are talking about "used" VW's, sorry I have no pity for them, if you're dumb enough to purchase something with no clue as to it's history and have problems, look in the mirror.

      And memory is short, look at VW's increases with the 2005-2006 models. VW had a pretty hard lapse for about 2 1/2 years and struggled with suppliers to get production up for the affected parts.

      They are no different than anyother maker, let's see Toyota sludge ring any bells? While it's been a while 77-79 Honda's head gasket and A-pipe failures, What's the name of that other car? Excel, no problems there.

      Manufacturers have problems, cars, appliances, you name it. Get over it.

      For what it's worth I still have a VW Jetta built during this period, no problems at all, my son and daughter have a 2002 and a 2003 the 2002 had coils, once replaced, just fine, the 2003 no problems, I had a 2001 had coils and 1 window problem that's it, sold outright at 90,000 miles with no other problems. The dealer was great, the repairs were quick and that was the end of it.

      • 8 Years Ago
      This set up is made for smaller engines. It is a great engine, 170 hp and about 35 m.p.g. Hopefully it can make it over here some time soon. The only problem is costs. It is probably an expensive engine, and will require premium. This is why the Jetta got the 2.5 liter engine instead of the 2.0 FSI in the first place.
      • 8 Years Ago
      #6 and #10, by your standard, almost nothing is actually "innovative" in the automotive industry because it's all been done before in some other form. New twists on old themes does qualify as innovative if it is done in a better way.

      I've come to accept that Autoblog is full of VW bashers who don't seem to realize that VW isn't a niche producer but is Europe's largest (and thus a mass-producer), but what I don't understand is that QC issues plagued all European manufacturers earlier this decade (DC actually being hit the hardest), but for some reason only VW's reputation took a hit.
      • 8 Years Ago
      This is innovative? We've all known about twincharging for years.

      The problem is making it work well together.

      And that is NOT something I trust to VW. They can't even make a plain naturally-aspirated car reliable. Forced induction makes any car less reliable... a complex dual-forced system coming from a low-quality manufacturer is truly a marriage made in hell.
      • 8 Years Ago
      #16

      I guess you can count me as one of the bashers..and my feelings are based on personal experience as well as what I've read about the experience of other VW owners. The bashing is not unjustified.

      The ADAC report cannot be considered an unbiased report. It is a German Automotive Association report. Regardless, it will take more than one model year to erase many years of poor quality vehicles, and that isn't just my opinion. There is a reason VW is a second tier brand in the US. It's not because of design - the cars look great, and it's not because of engineering talent - the DSG and this engine are unique in the industry. It's because they've built a reputation for making nice looking, seemingly well-engineered cars that spent a disproportionate amount of time being repaired. Even a top level VW official has made a target of a 50% reduction in warranty claims. They recognize they're cars are breaking far too often.

      I hope you are right that VW has turned the corner and I'll be first in line to buy their cars. But it's way too early for me to spend my cash on a new VW product. I'll stay on the sidelines until they've established a *longer-term* reputation for reliability. I think many other informed buyers will do the same.

      In many ways this mirrors the problems facing the US manufacturers. Many years of sub-standard cars have created a large pool of alienated car buyers. Cars are a lot of money for most people and if you burn them, it takes a looong time to get them back.
      • 8 Years Ago
      #12 #7

      You really go out of your way to rant about VW, don't you? I wonder why they are the only car maker with this type of engine? If it is so common how come nobody else does it? Because that combination of power and fuel economy sure looks good and this is a product that is on the road living up to its claims.

      And check out ADAC reliability report for 2006. Turns out VW's 2005 models (Golf, Polo, Passat, New Beetle) beat the Japanese models. So you should get prepared to complain about somebody else the years to come!
      • 8 Years Ago
      This concept should be implemented across the board on engines. A 3.0 with a twincharger implementation would improve torque, hp and economy by leaps.
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