• May 2, 2006

We thought that the Trackpedia "wiki" was a great idea when it originally launched, but now Billy Newport and his crew have an even better reason to visit the racetrack database - in-vehicle telemetry data and analysis.

Looking at GPS data - and getting some assistance with interpreting it - is certainly a good way to understand where better drivers are going faster, and beats the heck out of trying to ask better drivers how fast they're going at different areas of the track (there's a lot of things we're looking at while on the track, but the speedometer isn't one of them). Good drivers may certainly understand the art of going fast, but explaining how is often a different matter all together. Being able to put numbers to someone's performance is arguably the best way to understand the subtleties that go into piecing together a quick lap.

Currently, Trackpedia has data available for Brainerd International Speedway, and we definitely hope to see more of this for other tracks.

[Source: Trackpedia



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 3 Comments
      • 8 Years Ago
      SWEET!
      gbh
      • 8 Years Ago
      Ain't technology grand?

      To my mind, this is going to turn out to be one of the 'killer apps' of auto racing.

      Just think how much better you can plan EXACTLY where you want to be at any given point, to hit your lap target. Interface with an on board comp and GPS - so much less seat-of-pants BS.

      Those multi-million dollar Bosch telemetry trucks do a lot more for the teams that can afford such tech than most people know - or can comprehend. The big boys (F1 and the ilk) already know this stuff. This is part of the reason they are so fast.
      • 8 Years Ago
      Very very interesting