• Apr 9, 2006

Autoblog reader Phez turned us on to this 1951 Studebaker Champion... and boy, does it look like it could prove the old adage that restoring a car is a labor of love. The odometer reads a repectable 56,600 and the engine is an inline 6-cylinder, so if the mechanical stuff runs right it could be a great find. It evidently served as a working model for a tech school, so interpret that how you will (it's either in great shape or was a mad scientist experiement).  Cosmetically, the vehicle looks like it needs some mad TLC... the ripped headliner, "tired" upholstery and rusty innards (and outards) will all need some attention, but as Phez says, "Damnit, its a Studebaker."



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      Gerald Morris
      • 2 Years Ago
      I owned a 1947 ,,,1951 and several 1953's all of which were good cars, plus a 1953 pickup which i used as a parts runner in 1969--73, I would like to find another of any one of now, looking for a good one resonably priced
      • 8 Years Ago
      I can think of a couple of ways to cure the oil burning problem. I suspect a small-block Chevy engine could fit into that engine compartment!
      • 8 Years Ago
      The 1950 and '51 were the 2 years of Studebaker's bullet nose design.

      For history buffs, Studebaker was founded in 1852 (same year as Wells Fargo Bank) so that '51 was just one year before the company's 100th anniversary.
      The first Studebakers were Conestoga wagons that hauled people out West to find gold in California.

      The 1 millionth Studebaker was produced in 1950, I think.

      When the pictured car is finally running, be sure to buy a case of thick oil--those Studebakers had soft blocks and almost all were followed by a trail of blue, oil smoke. Also, the rear main bearing seals leaked oil onto the clutch disk causing lots of chatter.

      It'll be a fun ride, indeed!
      • 8 Years Ago
      You cannot beat the good old days where classics are classics, all the new cars coming out today seem to be getting poor but classics have affection. The car shown in the pic above would look absolutly stunning once restored.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I owned an old Studebaker while stationed at Homestead AFB south of Miami, drove it till it died, a good ol' car for sure!
      • 8 Years Ago
      You haven't lived till you've driven a studebaker...
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      ----------------------
      View 28 albums from the drop down window at moes garage
      http://spaces.msn.com/MOES-GARAGE/
      And don't forget to link to the garage....

      • 8 Years Ago
      Mine is better! It is a 1950 Commander. For you who don't know, the Commander and the champion are almost the same, but the Commander is longer and has a higher trim level. Mine has a big block 454 and it fits with room to spare.

      http://www.angelfire.com/super/1950bulletnose/BMayerle2.jpg

      http://www.angelfire.com/super/1950bulletnose/BMayerle3.jpg

      http://www.angelfire.com/super/1950bulletnose/BMayerle4.jpg

      I just LOVE my car!

      blake
      • 8 Years Ago
      The bulletnose Studes are definitely my favorites. I hope you enjoy it!
      • 8 Years Ago
      I love Studes. But, Ron, A 502 CRATE MOTOR WILL FIT. Why think small. Properly rodded, this car could be a 40k or more ride. "Foosed", it could be a 150k ride. If those reading this don't know what I'm saying, you aren't rodders.
      • 8 Years Ago
      The design of the car is nice. If it drives well then it can have good demand in the movie industry.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I owned an old Studebaker while stationed at Homestead AFB south of Miami, drove it till it died, a good ol' car for sure!