• Mar 1, 2006

Spanish Autoblogger Alberto Ballestín Gil caught these photos of the much-anticipated 2007 Porsche 911 GT3 at the Geneva Motor Show. The basis for Porsche's 911 GT3 RSR racecar puts out 415-horsepower from its 3.6-liter flat-six engine for a specific output of 115.3 horsepower-per-liter, "among the highest of any naturally aspirated production car," according to the automaker. The high-revving beaut also claims improved airflow in the form of a throttle valve enlarged from 76 to 82 millimeters, optimized cylinder heads, and a low-backpressure exhaust.

One thing that may be a slight annoyance to some is that the tachometer signals the optimum time to shift gears -- most Porsche guys we know don't need any help from the instrumentation, though some might find it a welcome addition. 

(Ten more pics and the full release after the jump).

 ATLANTA, Feb. 24 — Porsche's new 2007 911 GT3 will make its public debut at the Geneva Motor Show on February 28, 2006. The latest race- bred 911 sports coupe features a 415-horsepower naturally aspirated engine with an 8,400 rpm redline, an active suspension setup tuned for the track, and a mechanical limited-slip differential.


Serving as the homologation basis for Porsche's 911 GT3 RSR racecar, the 911 GT3 provides enthusiasts with an uncompromising road car that can easily transition to weekend track-day outings. The 415-horsepower, 3.6-liter flat- Six engine produces a specific output of 115.3 horsepower-per-liter, among the highest of any naturally aspirated production car. The Boxer engine's power peak is reached at 7,600 rpm, on the way to an 8,400 rpm redline -- 200 rpm beyond the previous GT3 model.


In addition to its high-revving characteristics, the GT3 engine's performance has been fortified by careful attention to airflow rates. Changes to the variable intake system include a throttle valve enlarged from 76 to 82 millimeters, optimized cylinder heads, and a low-backpressure exhaust system.


To take advantage of the extended-rev characteristics of the engine, the 2007 911 GT3 features a revised six-speed manual transmission, with lower gear ratios for 2nd through 6th, as well as shortened shift-lever throws. A new change-up display, which illuminates the tachometer shortly before the relevant engine speed is reached, provides GT3 pilots with an additional signal to optimize shift timing.

The combination of a more powerful, higher-revving engine and shortened gear ratios produces impressive acceleration figures, allowing the 2007 911 GT3 to reach 60 mph from a standstill in 4.1 seconds (0-100 km/h, 4.3 sec.), and 100 mph (160 km/h) from a standing start in 8.7 seconds. The top test- track speed of the new 911 GT3 is 193 mph (310 km/h).



For the first time, the 911 GT3 boasts an active suspension. The standard Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) system offers two chassis in one: the default configuration is similar to that of the previous model and is suitable for driving on alternating road surfaces. In Sport mode, the system provides even firmer damping, enabling more focused dynamics for the racetrack.



For the best possible transmission of engine power to the road, the GT3 is equipped with a comprehensive traction package, including new electronic Traction Control adapted from the Carrera(R) GT, standard-equipment 19-inch sports tires, and a mechanical limited-slip differential. The new Traction Control setup features traction-slip and drag-torque control functions, allows the safe application of power under any driving conditions, and can be completely disabled if desired.



The 2007 Porsche 911 GT3 will be available in North America beginning in August 2006. U.S. pricing for the new model is $106,000.



Porsche Cars North America, Inc. (PCNA), based in Atlanta, GA, and its subsidiary, Porsche Cars Canada, Ltd., are the exclusive importers of Porsche sports cars and Cayenne(R) sport utility vehicles for the United States and Canada. A wholly owned, indirect subsidiary of Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG, PCNA employs approximately 300 people who provide Porsche vehicles, parts, service, marketing and training for its 211 U.S. and Canadian dealers. They, in turn, provide Porsche owners with best-in-class service.

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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 13 Comments
      • 8 Years Ago
      I like everything about the car, except the front air Dam?
      Looks out of place.
      • 8 Years Ago
      The wing is a mandate from Sir Isaac Newton.
      • 8 Years Ago
      Somebody who is looking at GT3 would probably be very UNHAPPY with a GT2 or Turbo S as the GT3 is a normally aspirated car and the others are turbos.

      The line makes a lot of sense when you break it down. You have the entry level Carrera which is a great sports car all on its own. The S model adds some more power, better brakes and a stiffer suspension. The Carrera 4/4s offer four wheel drive for those who want a sports car to drive in most conditions. The Turbo and Turbo S offer exotic car performance at lower prices and give the buyer two options. The GT2/3 are pure exotic sports cars which are really meant for the few people that desire a car with a really hard edge.
      • 8 Years Ago
      The big wing is to counter the Japanese and their big wing. It's not just about HP or 0 to 60 any more, you need something to separate yourself in the marketplace.
      • 8 Years Ago
      "Are they inherently prone to rear end lift because of their shape?"
      Yes, and inherently unstable due to the rearward weight bias. My favorite quote about the 911 from a journalist who's name I can't recall is, "its like a dart thrown feathers first." :)
      Don't get me wrong though, I am a 911 owner, and I love the inherent instability.

      On the new GT3, too "stylized" for my taste. The 1st and 2nd iterations had a very much more purposeful approach to the styling. Porsche, leave the all the unnecessary bumps, ribs, and vents for the Turbo.
      • 8 Years Ago
      I don't like the weird front lower spoiler/grill treatment. It has too many odd intersecting lines that make it very busy looking. Also i'm not crazy about the "lip" that goes through the lower rear portion of the car. It gives it a look like something was glued onto the bottom rear bumper much like a bad body kit.

      Otherwise it's a nice looking car. I've always been a huge fan of these.
      • 8 Years Ago
      My question is why does porsche need a carrera, carrera 4, carrera 4s, 911 turbo, 911 turbo s, gt2, and gt3 which all essentially look the same. Someone please tell me anopther company that has this much variety in the high end sports car market. Im sure someone looking into a gt3 would be very happy with a turbo s or a gt2...
      • 8 Years Ago
      This thing will smoke a ZO6 on any track that involves using the steering wheel. Not that you would know anything about handling and balance.
      • 8 Years Ago
      My question is why does porsche need a carrera, carrera 4, carrera 4s, 911 turbo, 911 turbo s, gt2, and gt3 which all essentially look the same. Someone please tell me anopther company that has this much variety in the high end marker. Im sure someone looking into a gt3 would be very happy with a turbo s or a gt2...
      • 8 Years Ago
      im one happy-faced wannabe Porsche GT3 owner!!
      • 8 Years Ago
      Perfect! Except for the color...nah...forget that...it's perfect!
      • 8 Years Ago
      Justin,

      Who are you talking to?
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