• Feb 27, 2006


The European New Car Assessment Program (E-NCAP), which is sort of the EU equivalent to our own NHTSA or IIHS, recently tested the European version of the Chevy Aveo and found it to be severely lacking in occupant protection during 64 kmh (40 mph) frontal impacts. The risk is especially great to the driver, as the E-NCAP tests showed the Aveo’s steering wheel may cause severe chest injury.

The Aveo received two stars and a strike through in the category of Adult Occupant Protection, the strike through indicating there is a high risk for life-threatening injury. It should be noted that crash testing in Europe is done a bit differently than here in the U.S., despite E-NCAP sharing a star rating system with the NHTSA. The differences are too deep to delve into here, but you can check out a full explanation of the E-NCAP test procedures here.

The 2006 Chevy Aveo received an exemplary frontal impact rating of 5 stars from the NHTSA, so we’ll be very interested to see if the North American version of the 2007 Chevy Aveo fares as poorly in our own crash tests as it did in the E-NCAP test..

[Thanks to Sergio Sanchez for the tip]

[warning: link leads to pdf]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 25 Comments
      • 8 Years Ago
      Re: #10

      While they may not deserve to get maimed in an accident there's truth in that there is no free ride. You wanna save a couple bucks on your Korean ride? Fine but that'll cost you in less dependability and more injuries when/if you crash, not to mention the bad karma you generate.
      • 8 Years Ago
      The Aveo folded up like a beer can? Wow.
      • 8 Years Ago
      I take the IIHS's crash tests much more seriously than NHTSA's. Especially when it comes to side impacts.
      • 8 Years Ago
      It's amazing that a POS car like this one,that failed the Euro crash test is allowed here in NA.But other vehicles like the smaller micro cars from Peugeot,VW,Fiat,Scoda,,aren't...
      • 8 Years Ago
      Finished law school should take note of the history of automotive design before making obstreperous statements that are based on his own ignorance.

      http://www.automotiblesdeluxe.blogspot.com
      • 8 Years Ago
      Small cars of today are much safer than they were and most modern small cars are safer than large cars of 20 or more years ago.

      But for a small car to be as safe as a large car--ALL ELSE EQUAL--you'd have to repeal the laws of physics.

      That crumpled Aveo is scary in part because the vehicle population in the U.S. has changed in the last 15 years from mostly cars to mostly trucks and SUVs.

      That's the main reason I upgraded from a compact to a mid-sized car (with head curtain airbags included) a couple of years ago. Small cars don't have much of a chance against the monsters out there.
      • 8 Years Ago
      Have we ever seen anything but a 'poor' rating of any daewooo in a crash test
      • 8 Years Ago
      I think producers are develop electronic safety systems like air bag.
      • 8 Years Ago
      #1 -That's actually sort of misleading. A mid 1990s Merc or Volvo were engineered in the 1908s. These were the pre-CAD days where a car took 12 years on average to engineer. The Volvo 850 still did suprisingly well for a car introduced in 1991; that started it's inception in 1979! (http://www.euroncap.com/content/safety_ratings/details.php?id1=4&id2=54)

      The Mercs and Volvos did extremely well for it's time compared to cars of its time...and the Volvo did well for even now!

      You compare that to a modern car like this 2007 aveo, which was CAD-designed, and it's not comperable, because the Aveo is compared to other 2006 cars...not cars designed in the 1980s
      • 8 Years Ago
      • 8 Years Ago
      I hate to be overly-callous, but anyone dumb enough to risk their safety (and that of their families) to save a few bucks in a bottom-rung Daewoo gets what they deserve in an accident.
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