• Nov 3, 2005

Nissan North America is about to announce its decision to move headquarters to Cool Springs, Tennessee, a suburb of Nashville. Sources close to the company's decision making process have told The Tennessean that the choice as already been made, despite public comments to the contrary from Nissan. Nissan already employs 8,000 people in the state and the headquarter move would bring an additional 1300 jobs. Nissan is currently unhappy with the business climate in California and is looking to cut costs by the move. We've posted before that many of Nissan's employees in California are looking at their employment options as this move was first brought to light. Thanks to James for the tip.



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  • 38 Comments
      • 9 Years Ago
      >Nissan does risk losing a lot of talented >marketing and product development people, >however. This is true, but it's not like there aren't any talented people in Tennessee. It's not like all those talented people in the California offices were originally from California. I'm sure a good portion of them were educated elsewhere and moved to California seeking jobs because that's where those kinds of jobs are. And it's not like every single person in Tennessee wears bib overalls and walks around with a pitchfork and three teeth in their head. I see it as an opportunity to establish something good in a location where talented people that may not have the means or desire to get out to California can have an opportunity to show off their skills. I hope it works well for Nissan.
      • 9 Years Ago
      Here's somemore anecdotal-meaningless-bull. I've been to LA thrice. The first time, well it was the first time I'd seen smog... the second I touched down at LAX, looked out the window, bleh. The second time their was less smog... lots of traffic, mobs of people that left me loving the song "Why you'd want to live here?" by Death Cab (but I did enjoy getting away from the city and up in the mountains... but having hiked over AZ, CO, NM, TX I didn't see anything great). The third time no smog, but get this...now I've spent my entire life in Dallas, I went to school with Robert Tilton's children (kid you not), I frequent relatives in Arkansas, Tennessee and Missiouri and the only time I've ever been accosted by a 'Christian' happened walking out of some Indie movie theatre in Santa Monica... So there.. My meaningless crap stories totally trumps all of ya'lls!!..... Anyway, it is so much cheaper to live in the midwest then LA it's just plain silly. $300k around here buys something tantamount to a mansion. In CA it buys a standard house with a 2 hr commute. Nissan might loose some people, but they aren't the people responsible for the tech. (they'd be in Japan) or the designs (they aren't moving). It would be everyday cube monkeys and middle management (and heaven forbid... marketeers...). Nothing that will change the face of Nissan.
      • 9 Years Ago
      No offense to Tenn.....We should all be grateful we have a choice all about where to live. We have it pretty good in this country, no matter where you live..........let's not forget that while we talk trash. Thank GOD we all dont like the same things. It would be really crowded.............and boring.
      • 9 Years Ago
      I understand that inexpensive living isn't the end all be all for many people. However, in articles I have read regarding this topic it irratates me what some of the employees think. Bascially what NB Adam was commenting to. Many of my friends and co-workers are from other parts of the country (3 from Palos Verdes(sp?) and they love it. They have relatives that have come to visit and decided to move to Nashville. I'm just saying don't knock it 'til you've tried it.
      • 9 Years Ago
      I am sure Nissan can survive in Tennessee with or without the people who designed the beautiful, exciting, and non-bland 2000 Altima.
      • 9 Years Ago
      I'm surprised that so few people have commented on what seems to me to be obvious: > First, this is an attempt by Nissan to reduce its headcount without going through a voluntary or involuntary severance program. NNA is widely believed to be terribly overstaffed. Management knows that only a certain percentage of staffers will make the move to Tennessee. Paying a relocation package is a lot cheaper than paying a severance package. > How many people are employed at NNA's headquarters in Carson now? The Tennessee papers are reporting that Nissan will employ 1,200 or 1,300 people there; I bet that's a reduction of 600 employees or so. > I'm not sure whether NNA senior management believes that talented replacements can be found in Tennessee, or that the people at its headquarters staff aren't all that talented, or that its staff is simply inbred. (Honda and Toyota are a stone's throw away; the Koreans are a few miles south, along with Mazda, Suzuki, etc. Everyone at Nissan used to work at a competitor -- just as everyone at Honda and Toyota and all the rest did.) Maybe they are looking for fresh blood or maybe they think positions in marketing, P.R., service, parts, etc., don't require the kind of talent you find in L.A. Regardless, I don't think they think the move will be at all disadvantageous. I used to work for Nissan and now work for another import car company in Southern California.
      • 9 Years Ago
      1) Others have said it and I'll repeat it: Nissan's design studios for the US are in San Deigo and Detroit and aren't likely to move as part of this deal (though that's not 100% guaranteed). They are part of a separate reporting structure with their bosses in Japan, not Gardena. 2) Car companies do research in all major metro areas, not only in their backyards. Nissan will incur some additional costs because they probably won't be able to use their new backyard for 25-30% of research anymore, but the cost is minimal. Bottom line is that the research results that influence their decisions won't change because of the move. With these two facts, it's hard to see how moving from LA will result in boring cars. Heck, people in a culture known for lederhosen have made some of the best and most beautiful cars!
      • 9 Years Ago
      "Nashville is actually high up on places I would like to settle down." I think that's the point that some people are trying to make (with a reverse argument). Quiet cities where not much goes on could be exteremly nice if you're looking to "settle down" or are an oudoors enthusiast, but if you want an active life, (Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, Boston, etc.) are probably more to your liking since you can go out and have an active social life. There's just so much more to do and choose from even if you don't like some of it. With California being such a large market in the U.S. and with Art Center here, I hope they're keeping their U.S. design studio here. If the creative/artistic people I know are any indication, it would be tough to convince them to move from CA to TN. Midsized cities are rough if you like to go out with friends a lot. Southern smaller cities seem to be a slightly different special case. I spent 5 years in Atlanta...not fun at all. Has the same feel a lot of southern cities I've visited do... * Very dense "forresty" scenery (making you constantly feel like you're on the edge of nowhere) * No beach * Mostly black and white...or white and black * Fewer/rarer concerts and performances (especially international acts) * Tons of "band parties" (college) * Women calling you "hon" * Polos and khakis everywhere (I won't use the actual slang term for that, but it's pretty funny) * Lots of religion everywhere (you'll discover many bizarre reasons why you're "going to hell" or "unsaved")...my Jewish friend had fun with some of them * Quite a few of the people that are actually from the areas seem a little odd in a subtle, but genuinely creepy way The one awesome thing about Atlanta was Road Atlanta (of course), but since I was in school, I never had any chances to go (of course). The best thing going for smaller cities is the uber-cheap cost of living/operation. Of course I'm in San Diego right now which is both expensive and still fairly boring/plain...military city. Hanging out at a bar is about the best you can do unless you surf, mountain bike, or rock climb (the prevalent local hobbies). Speaking of those hobbies, I'm beginning to think the true lesson is that smaller cities are good places to move if you want to die "naturally" in a quietly comfortable setting.
      • 9 Years Ago
      Wow, I love how all of these people who have probably never been to Nashville all of a sudden jump to conclusions about the bible-belt and "country living". If any of you morons had ever been to Nashville, you'd know there is quite a lot to do around there, and as anyone who actually lives in the South will tell you, there is very little difference between a mid-sized southern city and a mid-sized northern/western city as far as "bible-thumping" and "country living" are concerned. Having spent a lot of time in Nashville, Atlanta, San Diego, Los Angeles, Phoenix, Dallas, and DC, I can tell you that Nashville is actually high up on places I would like to settle down. Its not like there are street preachers on every corner and big buck hunters running around. And it is a hell of a lot better than sitting in LA traffic, breathing LA smog, and worrying about LA crime. In short, get your heads out of your asses Steve S, Johnny Joker, and s. You obviously have no experience in the South and are only regurgitating the mass media stereotypes that are shoved down your throats. And to Scott, Amen, from someone who has seen first hand how crazy Cali can be.
      • 9 Years Ago
      I am a native of Los Angeles, and just relocated to Nashville about 3 months ago. Gee, I sure miss the graffiti, the dirt, the rudeness, the punishing taxes, loud rice-rockets, car alarms at all hours of the night, the crowding. Dear me, but I SOOO miss it. And I want my 600 sq ft apartment at 1200 a month back so bad I can TASTE it. Please, please, please, take me away from this greenery, cleanliness, the nice people. I SO hate this solid, brick house on over half an acre. And, my GOD! Did you know almost ALL the store clerks and fast food help speak English? As for the bible-thump types, I have not encountred any. I DO hear people using phrases like "...the Lord", etc. alot more here. But it just does not bother me. I'd rather hear that, than the words of California youth where every third word out of their mouth is an excratory or reproductive adjective. Welcome, Nissan folks. Just, please: LEAVE California, like I did. Don't pack it in your luggage and bring it with you.
      • 9 Years Ago
      You guys are missing the point of a stimulating envirenment. LA sucks from the living/commute/be a daddy point of view, but it kicks ass as far as stupid things to do, movies, screening shows, clubs, beaches, and just plain having a zillion people to interact with daily to breed ideas. Look at GM or Ford with their staid design or overblown concept-straight-to-street niche vehicles. Alot of help for Nissan came from their fresh designs in SoCal. You create perfect weather and the promise of hot chicks and you'll get happy designers who live in a 700k shack to surf in the mornings. Take the same guy and put him in a suit behind a white picket fence, and watch the creative molasses.
      • 9 Years Ago
      You know what? If LA residents think so low of the southern life, then let the elitist pricks stay in California. We hillbillies kin rUhn yur fochin fiddy cumpney. For those who do decide to make their way here to Nashvegas, enjoy the hell out of your 10 minute drive to work.
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