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Maximum Motorsports <a class=Mustang Suspension" src="http://www.weblogsinc.com/common/images/3060000000052076.JPG?0.2650234524002578" align="top" border="0" height="319" hspace="0" vspace="4" width="425" />
Our prayers have been answered! Maximum Motorsports, a company that specializes in performance suspension components for Ford Mustangs, is showing two new suspension systems for the 2005+ Ford Mustang. The front suspension system is a double A-arm independent setup to replace the stock strut configuration. The big news is in the rear, where Maximum has created an independent rear suspension system to replace the stock Mustang's solid rear axle. The vehicle concept also includes Bilstein coil-overs with Eibach springs at all four corners. We've been waiting for the aftermarket to respond to the new Mustang in this way, with competition quality aftermarket suspension components. Thanks to Eric Bryant for snatching up these pics in his coverage of the SEMA show in Las Vegas.

Maximum Motorsports Mustang Suspension
Maximum Motorsports Mustang Suspension
Maximum Motorsports Mustang Suspension
Maximum Motorsports Mustang Suspension




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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 17 Comments
      • 9 Years Ago
      jim, i wouldnt consider a solid rear a major drawback, you should at least drive a new mustang before you deside that the rear axle is crap. i drive a 01 mustang with the older design rear axle, (4 link, no panhard bar, soft rubber bushings), the "hop" you hear about is only during hard turns on bumpy curves, it does not hop sideways driving straight or during minor turns. now the 05 has a panhard bar which greatly reduces the "hop" by keeping the axle squarely in its place side to side. as far as unsprung weight and comfort, yes irs is nicer. but i would strongly recommend you at least drive a 05+ mustang, this is not the same rear end as the boats of yesteryear were equipped with. all the reviews i have read dont mention anything about the solid axle becoming a drawback.
      • 9 Years Ago
      Its more likely that a Lincoln LS independent rear susp. would bolt to an '05 or newer Mustang, but i don't know how durable that would be. The Lincoln LS, Jaguar S-Type and Mustang share the basic platform.
      • 9 Years Ago
      An IRS would break under drag conditions. Drag racer people have been waiting for the new mustang and would be very dissapointed if it had IRS. I dont think drag rules even allow IRS. Check the Mustang magasines and it will be obvious where these cars are going
      • 9 Years Ago
      Holy crap. I didn't even realise that the new Mustang even had a solid rear. Drag racers aside (because surely they must only be a small group), I guess they really are just giving in to the clueless "hardcore" fans. I mean, when was the last time you saw a high-performance car with a solid rear axle?
      • 9 Years Ago
      I would have expected the SVT/CS version at least offer an IRS. Make it possible for the drag wanna-be to go with the live axle. One selling point of the new Mustang was the live rear end worked well. But I wonder if an IRS was at least 'looked at' by Ford and was deemed too weak?
      • 9 Years Ago
      Do we have a time or price for the release of these products? I would love to see a comparison review between the performance numbers between a stock 2005 Mustang before and after the installation of these products. Hey, I would even volunteer my own 2005 Mustang GT.
      • 9 Years Ago
      As the prior owner of a '00 GT and now an '03 Cobra, I prefer the IRS over the solid axle for every day driving situations. The ride quality is 100% better and turning on an uneven surface is much more controlled. I looked into buying a Roush Stage 3 before I purchased the Cobra, but the IRS swayed me to buy the factory Ford. I had been planning to make the GT500 my next car, but changed my mind due to the plans for a solid axle and heavy iron 5.4L block. I decided to look back into the Roush Stage 3 again, but with this IRS soon to hit the market I think I'll build the Cobra that SVT couldn't build. I want an aluminum 4.6L block with a twin-screw at 450+ bhp, and an IRS. Since Ford refuses to build a proper SVT Cobra, it's good to see someone stepping up and designing an IRS for those of us that believe it's a necessary requirement for a well rounded Mustang.
      • 9 Years Ago
      There has been lots of talk about IRS vs. solid. The drag racers tend to prefer the solid, those that like lateral "g's" like IRS. Most reading this forum know the arguments. One point I do not normally see in these discussions is the benefits of IRS is day in, day out driving; unsprung weight, comfort, and the lack of the tendency to "hop" sideways when a pot hole or bump is encountered, particularly in a curve. I consider the lack of IRS on the new model Mustang - at least as an option - to be a major drawback. Yes, I understand the price point thng. Anyone know what this aftermarket unit is going to cost?
      • 9 Years Ago
      I have an '06 Mustang GT and the solid rear axle is no problem for anything I will do with it. I have no desire to take it into competition or anything but for the people that do should have no problem pay a little extra to swap out the solid axle.
      • 9 Years Ago
      This is great news. I may even sell my 2003 Cobra to get a newer Stang with this MM setup. Many believe the FR500C in Grand Am Cup is proof-positive that a solid axle is all that's needed. I don't agree for two reasons. First, the FR500C was a superstar this season due to horsepower/torque superiority and not handling superiority. Two, the FR500C is a track car, and is not on the more "unprepared" roads of America where this MM IRS setup is needed. Sure, the solid axle is a cost-saving measure. It sure isn't used because it's better. If that were the case, then we'd see a lot more solid axles out there on true sports cars; fact is, we don't. Way to go MM!!!
      • 9 Years Ago
      I thought Ford gave the Mustang and old-school solid truck-like rear axle for the hard core types, and let the majority of the buying public deal with it becuase it's a Mustang. Why would a hard-core racer type with a Mustang want an independant rear suspension then, if Mustang already decided they didn't want it?
      • 9 Years Ago
      I love how Roadracers only see themselves and no one else. Small crowed of drag racers? Go to a test and tune night which happens once or twice every week and the attentance will blow away an auto x race. And Justin Bell : I mean, when was the last time you saw a high-performance car with a solid rear axle? I hope you were kidding otherwise you are clueless.
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