• Oct 25, 2005

With gas prices as high as they are nowadays, more and more Americans are starting to consider hybrids as an option for their next car purchase. And if you want a Prius, better get your order in now and be prepared for the wait — according to ToMoCo, the waiting list in the U.S. has gone from two months in September to three to four months in October. Rest assured, the debate over the validity of hybrids will be raging all the while you wait for yours.



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  • 34 Comments
      • 9 Years Ago
      Even though battery life will likely exceed the length of time the first buyer of a Prius will own the car, won't the expectation of having to replace the battery pack ultimately have a negative effect on resale compared with non-hybrids? All old cars are expected to cost more to maintain as they age; however, hybrids add yet another cost that can be expected to drag resale values below values of simpler cars as hybrids age beyond 5 or 6 years. I don't know how that can be quantified this early in the frenzy for hybrids but it's worth some thought.
      • 9 Years Ago
      Okay you guys, lets take a stand and not get sucked into this debate again. I can't belive it this is virtually the same damn post as Monday. Must be in need of traffic.
      • 9 Years Ago
      Gas is at a reasonable price level. God Bless America. Let's all load up our Suburbans and drive to Disneyworld. And no, I'm not some political hack. Why would you think that?
      • 9 Years Ago
      "Makes my new purchase of a Suburban seem very timely now that gas has retreated to a realistic level." You speak as though you are sure it's going to stay 'reasonable' (hint: it's not).
      • 9 Years Ago
      " really - this persecution complex on the part of hybrid haters is comical. No one is out to force you to drive a Prius, but if you're going to come to threads and start spouting off on the topic, don't just expect people to roll over and accept whatever you say as gospel. " Agreed JW. Ditto for the other side of the fence as well. ESPECIALLY when there seem to be hybrid proponents who don't even own or drive one.
      • 9 Years Ago
      Joseph, that website you cited about gas prices in DC is in no way representative of gas prices in other towns across the river (probably not MD either). the lowest price gas station I passed on the way home was 2.64, there were two others at 2.75 and 2.84, well within the highest price list in the DC gas price website. There is no gas for under 2.50 here in alexandria which is within spitting distance of DC. http://www.virginiagasprices.com/index.aspx?s=Y&fuel=A&area=Alexandria&tme_limit=24
      • 9 Years Ago
      whofan, Toyota recently made two other JDM cars which were broadly similar to the new generation Prius. (JDM = Japanese Domestic Market). see www.autoindex.org and look at Toyota - Japan. The Toyota Nadia - 1998-2003. 2 litre engine, automatic, 2wd. 7.0 litres per 100 km of gasoline. The Toyota Opa - 2000-2005. 1.8 litre engine, automatic, 2wd. 6.7 litres per 100 km of gasoline. The Toyota Prius - 2004-2006. 1.5 litre engine and hybrid system, 2wd. 4.3 litres per 100 km of gasoline. So fuel use for the Prius is about 61% of a similar conventional 2.0 litre displacement 5 seat car, while it uses about 64% of a similar conventional 1.8 litre displacement 5 seat car. Stop being a skeptic, everybody. Go rent one. Be ready for an epiphany. You'll be surprised at the amount real, useable room - even compared to a GM Tahoe SUV. Here's a tip. Drive it just like you do your daily use, conventional car for awhile. Check your mileage (computer AND measured). Now try driving sensibly - stay back from others so you have room to maneuver, anticipate lights a little if possible, slow down gradually a little bit sooner for red lights, step up to speed (3-4 mph above where you want to be) then back off the go-pedal, then touch the go-pedal to retain your speed. Drive like that for awhile. Then check your MPG. You'll see a vast improvement as well as being more relaxed while driving. You'll be hooked....
      • 9 Years Ago
      "So the answer is that, hybrid owners in defense of THEIR purchase are trying to make an environmental and economic case for THEIR purchase." Horseshit. It's people like you who bring it up, so people like me take it up and shoot your b.s. down. If I were in the market for a new vehicle, I wouldn't think twice about buying a hybrid -- even if gas were free. But if you want to bring up the economics angle, people like me are more than happy to comply. And when we do (and the numbers work out), guys like you just retreat into emotional arguments about size, power, "not meeting EPA", and other lies. You lost the economic argument long ago.
      • 9 Years Ago
      Straight up arguning like bitches in here is going on, you guys have more in common with a Prius owner than you think, apparently.
      • 9 Years Ago
      # 6, Econ, Make no mistakes, I am not trying to compare my Suburban with the Prius, a Prius is a small car, used mostly by commuters here in NoVA.....but comparing a Chevy Cobalt or Aveo to a Prius at $2 a gallon seems pretty fair right? I bet the Cobalt is a much better value right now, vs the Prius then a month ago, perhaps even a Impala or Avalon with more room make more sense at $2 a gallon. My Suburban serves a different purpose, mainly moving my 5 person family and dog, plus large amount of baby crap on frequent trips to NYC and Florida.
      • 9 Years Ago
      "How much more than other low emissions vehicles? At highway speed the difference is not much greater, say a Civic Hybrid vs. a regular Civic?" (BF #18) The flaw in your thinking is that it matters about emissions being broadly similar on the highway. Most pollution from IC cars comes at start-up. The Prius II is extremely clean because Toyota use something "like" a thermos bottle (and an electri pump) to place hot anti-freeze/water from the cooling system into the bottle to stay hot, then before the IC engine lights up, the warm to hot water (apparently it stays hot for 72 hours or more) is is pumped into the alloy head of the IC engine to warm it - thus virtually no pollution as the engine head is warm, so the fuel does not quench and combusts better - plus the catalyst can "light up" quickly. Anyway, that's the short version of how it (apparently) works. Suffice to say, I've said it before, the Prius puts out something on the order of 11% of the pollution compared to the legal requirements for California - or so I understand. I read on the Toyota New Zealand website that a Prius will pollute less in 25,000 miles than a careless person dropping one measuring cup of gasoline onto the ground (say, from trying to fill up a lawnmower). Pretty awesome.
      • 9 Years Ago
      #29, Joe, "OK - I appreciate your honesty on that. So your objections to solo drivers in diamond lanes really isn't genuine." I really don't have a huge problem with the hybrid exemption, I just want to make sure that the HOV lanes don't get as jammed as the regular lanes....right now hybrids make up maybe 10% of the cars in HOV in my unscientific observation. So it is not yet a problem.
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