• Sep 26, 2005

Foreign automakers have made attempts to infiltrate the compact and light-duty pickup truck markets, but those of us looking for 8-lug wheels and a 3000-lb payload (the "3/4-ton" name is a misnomer) were limited to the vehicles offered by the Big 3. Toyota might be looking to change that after they launch their all-new half-ton Tundra. Japanese truck makers have not had much success taking market share away from the domestics, but perhaps such a model could change things. Provide room in the wheelwells for 35s, and they'd have at least one convert. Some might say that Toyota lacks the experience to build such a vehicle, but that shows an ignorance of their Hino commercial-truck lineup, which builds the rather fierce-looking vehicle pictured to the right.



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  • 23 Comments
      • 9 Years Ago
      Your patriotic silverodo is made in Mexico and your ram is designed in Germany. While the Nissan Titan is designed, developed, and manufactured in the US. Hmmm... something to think about what's really domestic and what's foreign.
      • 9 Years Ago
      THEY'RE GONNA TEK OUR JERBS! Larry, it's time for you to get back in the pile.
      • 9 Years Ago
      Wow, and people call out GM for concentrating on trucks when Toyota is doing the same thing. I believe they should really get the Tundra up to scratch before trying to compete in the much smaller heavy duty pickup segment. They have yet to prove they are committed to building a full size pickups as well as the big three and even Nissan. Its is not as if they can't build good full size trucks, the land cruiser was a great truck in its prime, they just let them get old and dated.
      • 9 Years Ago
      MD is right. Had this been GM, we would have all the haters out talking about how GM is out of touch with the market, and how GM doesn't get it when it come to fuel economy and how the mighty Toyota can do no wrong. Looks like GM isn't the only one who sees a market in trucks. I am fine with Toyota getting into the HD pick-ups. That said I would still buy a 2007 Silverado first.
      • 9 Years Ago
      Thanks Larry, The next time that you want to support America, you might want to take a little more time to construct coherent sentences. I don't want to be one of those pricks who correct grammar in Internet posts, but it is really hard to take someone seriously when they come off as an uneducated redneck (this is coming from a self-confessed redneck, albeit a fairly educated one). Back to the truck, I think this is nothing but good news for the American Truck industry. Anyone who has seen how much better trucks have gotten in the last 10 years will agree that the market has benefitted from increased competition. Do you think that the interiors of the new F-150 or 2006 Silverado would look as good as they do if the Tundra hadn't come along and risen the bar? While I still think that American trucks are all around better trucks than their Japanese counterparts, the Tundra and Titan are still damn nice trucks, and if their heavy duty versions are as good, it can mean nothing but improvements for all truck buyers.
      • 9 Years Ago
      Ford has a small plant in Mexico making a small portion of the F-Series trucks (and that plant is closing in 2006). Meanwhile Ford also makes F-Series trucks in FOUR U.S. plants - Dearborn, Kansas City, Louisville, and Norfolk!
      • 9 Years Ago
      #5. Do you not believe in capitalizing the beginning of your sentences, and ending them with some sort of punctuation? You don't seem to be very educated as well.
      • 9 Years Ago
      #12, Durka, Durka!
      • 9 Years Ago
      #14 - I don't think you can compare Toyota and GM. Toyota is developing their heavy duty truck line while also leading the development of hybrid vehicles and producing a large variety of cars that get decent mileage already. GM, on the other hand, has been banking the company on their big SUVs and Pickups while allowing the emerging market for hybrids to completely pass them by. GM is out of touch with parts of the market, Toyota is doing their best to cover all of it.
      • 9 Years Ago
      This debate can become very complicated very quickly. But the fact of the matter is, Toyota--especially with new plants planned for Texas--is providing many, many jobs for Americans. And yes, almost all parts used to assemble the 2007 Tundra WILL NOT BE IMPORTED. To the same effect, GM has many Mexican workers under it's rooves, working against our economy. And of course there are four plants manufacturing the 1/2 ton F-150. It remains, with a wide margin, the most successful 1/2 ton in America. But if Toyota does gain sales, it will only mean a better outlook for the American economy. In any event, Toyota's contributions mean that whichever automaker you choose for your next pickup, effects on America's success as a country will be minimal as to be trivial. Just buy what you think is the best truck; whether it be GM, Ford, Toyota, Dodge, or Nissan (Although, am not a Titan advocate). Thank you for your time, and keep in mind, I realize that many of you have much more experience as truck owners, since I am only sixteen. E-mail me, if you like, at jared@animeclyc.com with comments.
      • 9 Years Ago
      I am opposed to protectionism for the reasons cited above: It weakens our ability to remain competitive in the world market. Look at the inferior products built by state-subsidized Fiat. Even the Italians won't buy them... At the same time the Asian auto industry does not have a century worth of retirement and health benefits built into the cost of each vehicle they build. The US auto industry cannot hope to compete within this environment, and the only solution is to tarrif or limit imports to LEVEL THE PLAYING FIELD. I am not fooled by Japanese assembly plants located in the US. The few thousand jobs created are a token donation to quiet the critics. Components are largely imported, meaning lost US jobs, and at the end of the day our dollars go overseas. Today the focus is on Japan. Korea is now a worthy competitor in the entry-level market, and benefits from even cheaper labor than Japan. Wait until the Chinese begin importing cars. we have it good right now. These issues are not unique to the auto industry. Look at electronics. We invented most of the technology, and were leaders in the industry. Can you buy a US engineered-and-built TV today? I am a believer in Industrial Darwinism: Survival of the Fittest Company. But the unfair advantage enjoyed by our competitors amounts to widescale slaughter of US industry as a whole.
      • 9 Years Ago
      I just wish that Toyota would hurry up and update the Sequioa so I can get one...
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