Much of the review is organized around the CGT's clutch, a comparatively small carbon fiber disc that comes straight out of Porsche's high-speed endurance racing heritage. The way the clutch handles the V10's staggering 605-hp is integral to the driving experience, with the car's all-around extreme sensitivity being embodied in the travel of the left pedal, which seems to amplify even the slightest driver input. That is to say, it's hard to take off smoothly and without seeming like an ostentatious jackass who needlessly revs to draw attention to himself. But once you're moving and the engine is operating in the upper RPM register required to get the CGT up to cruising speed, watch out. The reviewer compares the acceleration to that of a modern superbike, and provides handling and braking response that no non-professional driver could ever use to its full potential. That being said, I'm sure there are plenty of non-professionals who'd love to try, myself included. Unfortunately, unless your name begins with a Jerry and ends with a Seinfeld, it's not easy to get seat time. However, worth a read and a chuckle are the 30-odd "Consumer Reviews" by users who claim to own CGTs and yet cannot spell "bought" correctly.



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